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Full text of "Hatfield Annual Town Report"

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Annual Reports 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN. 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN" OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year ending 



MARCH 12th, 1860. 



NORTHAMPTON : 

PRINTED BY JXLEYTCAXuW &c COMPANY. 

1860. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/hatfieldannua18601890hatf 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield: — 

In compliance with the vote of the- town at the last 
annual meeting, we herewith present to you an account of 
the Keceipts and Expenditures of the town for the past year. 

Our highways and bridges at the commencement of the 
year were in a bad condition, owing to the great freshet 
which occurred last spring ; consequently it required consid- 
erable expenditure of labor and money to render them safe 
and convenient ; — the surveyors have been faithful and we 
believe have expended their labor and money with good judg- 
ment : some of the bills are not fully expended and as nearly 
or quite a month will probably elapse before the new survey- 
ors will be chosen and qualified to take charge of the roads, 
we have left such bills still in the hands of the present sur- 
veyors to expend wherever the same shall be needed. 

The highway over the culvert at Dewy's Hole needs some 
special repair, other than what is expected of a highway 
surveyor in the ordinary discharge of the duties of his office ; 
it seems to us that some way should be devised to carry the 
water over the sides of the embankments, so as to prevent it 
from cutting out the road, and making deep and dangerous 
gullies in it, as is now the case after every great rain. 

The care and oversight of the bridges of the town, were 
placed in the hands of a special Committee at the last annual 
meeting ; on many of them extensive repairs were necessary 
for the safety of the public travel and to protect the town 
from liabilities for damage ; the Committee have been prompt 
and efficient in the discharge of their duty, and we think it 
will be for the interest of the town, to place the care of the 
bridges annually under a special committee raised for the 
purpose. 



There has been some change as to the paupers of the town 
the past year. Amos Newport who for nearly seven years 
has been partially supported by the town has died within the 
year. Two of the sons of the late Asa "Wells have recently 
become chargeable to the town and we are now having them 
kept for about one dollar per week each ; — with these excep- 
tions our paupers are the same as the previous year. 

Many of the guide boards of the town are down, and some 
of them are either broken or lost — we have erected one new 
one near the house of Lewis Dickinson, and thought it best 
to refer the subject to the annual meeting of the replacement 
of the others. 

Israel Gr. Dickinson was re-appointed Liquor Agent for the 
year commencing the 4th day of May last ; we believe he has 
discharged the duties of his office with faithfulness ; the con- 
dition of the Agency will be reported at the Annual meeting. 

The suit of James L. Sykes against the town has been ter- 
minated within the year in favor of the town ; and although 
the defense of the town was committed to an Agent specially 
chosen for the purpose, yet as there has been considerable 
expense incurred by the town in their defense, and there has 
been manifested by many of the inhabitants a desire to know 
the grounds of the decision in which we in common with the 
other towns of the Commonwealth have so great an interest, 
we thought it proper to embody a short history of the suit 
together with the decision of the Court in this report. 

The suit was commenced in January, 1858 ; the Agent of 
the town employed Messrs. Forbes & Spaulding as counsel ; 
the action came to a partial trial in October following, when 
the presiding judge took it from the jury, and sent it to an 
Auditor to hear and report the case, to a future term of the 
Court : the Auditor's report which was adverse to the town 
in the main, was made to the June term of the Court of 
Common Pleas, 1859, and was accepted by the Court ; the 
counsel for the town took exceptions to the report of the 
Auditor and, the ruling of the Court, and carried the case to 



the Supreme Judicial Court for argument ; the Supreme Court 
reversed the decision of the lower Court, and remanded the 
case back to that Court for a new trial ; and as the counsel 
for the Plaintiff decided not to bring the case back into the 
lower Court for a new trial, the Agent of the town in order 
to bring the matter to a final end, brought the case back again 
into the lower Court, and judgment was entered against the 
Plaintiff for the costs amounting to one hundred dollars. 

It will be readily perceived that the town have been com- 
pelled in their defense to labor at a disadvantage, as they were 
obliged to be at all the expense in carrying the case up to the 
higher Court, and also, all the expense in bringing it back 
into the lower Court for judgment ; and as the Plaintiff has 
no property, of course these expenses with the other legal 
taxable costs of the town, have to be borne by them without 
hope of remuneration. The following brief reasons for the 
decision of the Court have recently been sent to the Agent 
of the town. 

" The plaintiff's claim for compensation for his services 
must rest upon one of two grounds ; either that by virtue of 
his office he is the agent of the town, and in their employ- 
ment, and therefore entitled to a reasonable compensation for 
services rendered ; or that there was a contract by the town 
to pay him. 

1. A surveyor of highways is not entitled to compensation 
for his official services, and has no right by virtue of his office, 
to do work for the town beyond the amount of his own tax 
bill, where the highway tax is raised to be expended in labor 
and materials. 

2. The facts found in this case are not sufficient to prove 
a contract between him and the town to do this labor for 
which he claims compensation." 

At the meeting in November last, the Selectmen were 
instructed' "to investigate the rights of the town in and to 
any land or lands near the mills of Harvey Moore ; to take 
counsel and such further action in the premises as they shall 
deem expedient to guard and protect the interests of the 
town." 



6 

In pursuance of these instructions we examined the records 
of the town and county in regard to the original laying out 
and location of the highway commencing near the north end 
of the Mill bridge and running west towards Pantry and the 
Deerfield road so called, and also had a survey of the same 
made to authenticate the records ; we found that a portion of 
the Deerfield road lying contiguous to the west end of the 
north abutment of said bridge was fenced up, and that James 
Morton, the adjoining land owner, claimed that his land 
extended to the abutment ; and another strip beginning at 
the elm tree standing near the north-west corner of said bridge 
and running west to the north-east corner of the Allis house, 
so called, has been enclosed within 40 years ; also another 
parcel of land lying on the northerly and westerly side of said 
road leading to Pantry beginning near a blacksmith's shop 
and running in a westerly and southerly direction to a point 
opposite the land of Henry Wilkee. 

Acting under the advice of counsel we entered a complaint 
to the grand jury of the county at their session in December 
last against James Morton for enclosing these lands — this body, 
for reasons best known only to themselves, refused to find a 
bill of indictment against him. 

The town at the last annual meeting made no appropriation 
to defray the expenses growing out of the suit of James L. 
Sykes, but we have been enabled to pay them from the con- 
tingent fund of the town. As one of the schools has not yet 
closed, the money for it has not been drawn from the Treas- 
ury, but will be before the annual meeting. 

There will also be a small bill due for printing this and the 
school report. 

We have canceled all the other bills against the town that 
have come to our knowledge. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance in the Treasury April 2, 1859, 


$225 98 


Amount of taxes assessed, 


3986 91 


Received from State School Fund, 


40 00 


" rent of Town Hall, 


31 50 


" for Dog licenses, 


17 00 


" A. M. Peck, highway surveyor, 


3 72 


" for grass in burial ground, 


5 00 


" " sale of lots in burial ground, 


5 50 




$4315 61 


EXPENDITURES. 





OLD BILLS. 
Paid outstanding orders drawn by former Board of 
Selectmen, 
" C. D. Bartlett, wood furnished District No. 5, 
" J. R. Abbott, labor and timber furnished, 
" Sylvanus Crafts, do. 

" Z. W. Bartlett, do. 

fi D. D. Gardner, do. 

" M. B.Dickinson, provisions, &c. furnished A. Newport, 2 88 



166 


44 


14 00 


3 


46 


2 


00 


3 


50 


1 


00 



for support of Lydia Potter, 

James Porter, for cash paid for printing School 

Report and making out the same, 
James Porter, for services as School Committee 

in 1858-59, 
F. D. Billings, do. 1858-59, 

A. Newport, for his support, 
Philetus Averill, measuring plank, 
Admin'r of J. H. Knight's Estate, for services 

as School Committee in 1858-59, 
James Porter, board of school teachers in winter 

of 1858-59, 



12 38 

4 75 

12 00 
18 00 

7 

1 



00 
25 



8 50 



6 17 



$263 33 



SCHOOL 


s. 

Leber 


in Dist. 




C. M. Anderson, for services as tea 


No. 4, 45 00 


Jennie Warner, 


do. 






< 2, 48 00 


H. L. Russell, 


do. 






' 5, 3 34 00 


Emily Wheeler, 


do. 






' 1, 70 00 


Jane M. Billings, 


do. 






< 3, 66 00 


Mary C. Billings, 


do. 






< 2, 166 00 


Martha D. Billings, 


do. 






' 2, 52 00 


Cynthia Langdon, 


do. 






' 4, 24 75 


Mary F. Pomeroy, 


do. 






< 3, 35 90 


A. C. S. Hardy, 


do. 






' 3, 7 52 


Abia C. Baker, 


do. 






1 1, 51 75 


Sam'l Harrington, 


do. 






< 2, 85 09 


D. P. Morton, for boarding 


school teacher 12 


weeks, 27 00 


0. D. Hastings, 


do. 


20 weeks, 


40 00 


J. W. Warner, 


do. 


20 


(t 


40 00 


A. S. Jones, 


do. 


22 


a 


55 50 


S. D. Bartlett, 


do. 


11 


a 


27 50 


H. S. Porter, 


do. 


114 


it 


28 75 


H. Wait, 


do. 


11 


u 


22 00 


E. L. Hastings, 


do. 


16 


it 


32 00 


D. W. Allis, 


do. 


12 


a 


36 40 


H. R. Graves, for wood furnished School Dis 


:.No.4, 12 16 


F. D. Billings, 


do. 






11 2, 12 00 


E. Marsh, 


do. 






" 3, 22 00 


J. W. Warner, 


do. 






" 1, 13 75 


E. L. Hastings, 


do. 






" 5, 16 50 


Philos Doan, for sawing v 


/ood, 






4 00 




$1175 57 



POOR. 



Paid A. Newport, for his support, 
" Dr. Smith, attendance upon A. Newport, 
" H. Wait, keeping Sarah Green, 
'.* H. Anderson, " Calvin Morton, 
" Cutter Smith, " Theo. Wells, 
* Dr. Harwood, attendance on H. Wheeler's child 

and Sarah Green, 
" 0. Marsh, keeping transient paupers, 
" H. P. Billings, for boots furnished Wm. Wells, 
" P. Chapin, keeping A. Wells, 
" Silas Bard well, for support of 0. Bard well, 
" S. H. Dickinson, " Asa Wells, 



19 


00 


11 


50 


137 


92 


50 


00 


34 

i 


46 


I 

10 


50 


5 


25 


3 


00 


19 


33 


75 


00 


12 


00 



CONTINGENCIES. 



Paid Z. W. Bartlett, for work on bridges, 
" H. Moore, for lumber, 
'..' W. H. Dickinson, for plank, 
" H. S. Porter, mowing old burial ground and 

repairing foot walk, 
" W. D. Billings, for services as Clerk, 
" E. Graves, " surveying, 

" E. A. Dickinson, " as Assessor, 

" D. Allis, 
" J. T. Fitch, 
2 



$377 96 



64 


79 


12 


75 


29 


59 


4 


50 


27 


42 


5 


00 


26 


75 


27 


75 


30 


28 



10 



Paid D. Allis, for work and lumber on Hill and Mill 
bridges, 

44 Geo. Wait, for services as Com. on bridges, 

44 E. F. Cooley, for overwork on highway, 

44 CD. Squires, care of Hall, 

44 H. P. Billings, for services as Treasurer, 

44 E. N. Sampson, 44 Collector and 

serving town warrants, 

44 E. Hubbard, for services as Selectman, 

44 J. Scott, do. 

44 Geo. W. Hubbard, for services in the Sykes 

suit and cash paid, 21 66 

44 Geo. W. Hubbard, balance due for time spent 
about highways near Moore's Mill and Hotel 
expenses, 14 93 

44 Geo. W. Hubbard, for attendance on Board of 
Electors, Cash paid for legal advice, and ser- 
vices as Selectman, 26 41 

44 Forbes & Spaulding, for legal services, 211 05 

$718 66 



18 


37 


2 


50 


10 


00 


4 


50 


15 


00 


41 


00 


10 25 


14 


16 



Abatement of taxes, 18 17 

Paid County Tax, 1047 71 

44 State 44 357 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



Keceipts into the Treasury, $4315 61 

PAYMENTS BY THE TOWN. 

For Old bills, 263 33 

44 Schools, 1175 57 

44 Poor, 377 96 



11 



Paid Contingencies, 
" Abatement of taxes, 
" County tax, 
" State " 



Amount in hands of Treasurer March 12, 1860, 

to new account, $357 21 



718 


66 


18 


17 


1047 


71 


357 


00 


$3958 40 



GEO. W. HUBBARD, ) Selectmen 
JAMES SCOTT, > of 

ELISHA HUBBARD, ) Hatfield. 

H. P. BILLINGS, Treasurer. 
March 12, 1860. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Of the Town of Hatfield, 1859-60. 



Your Committee have attended to the duties devolving 
upon them, and do in conformity to the Law of this Common- 
wealth, present to the town, their annual report on the state 
of the Public Schools. 

In making our Report, we enter upon this duty feeling in 
a greater degree than ever, the responsibility that has rested 
upon us, in view of the extra duties which have been placed 
upon us by law, viz., that of procuring Teachers, at least a 
part of the year, for the several schools. 

We would say that the arrangement has brought with it 
increased anxiety, as well as labor. From the fact that this 
course has been advocated for so long a time by State as well 
as Town Committees, it may seem, to some persons, to be a 
matter of experiment, or in other words, a test as to the expe- 
diency of continuing the system, it being decided by the 
success of the schools for the time being. We would express 
ourselves, that while it cannot be denied that the Superin- 
tending committee have increased opportunities for ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of teachers, as well as, to their where- 
abouts, beyond that of Prudential Committees, whose term of 
office usually continues but one year ; still, in view of the 
many incidental and local questions which may arise in any 
district, we are quite willing that these responsibilities should 
be assumed by the Prudential Committee. 

In making our report, we would say that we believe cir- 
cumstances have much to do with a teacher's success. In the 
first place, the condition of the school, the nature of the dis- 
cipline to which it has been previously subjected, and the 
views of the district as to what constitutes a good school. 
3 



14 

We find that in one school a teacher may have good suc- 
cess, the scholars willingly rendering obedience, while the 
same teacher may take another school having been under 
different treatment, and encountering prejudices which are 
not easily overcome, which, if not a failure, very much im- 
pairs the reputation of the teacher. And in making our 
report, we would bear this in mind, lest we may convey the 
impression that those who have not met with such success as 
may have been desired, are unfit for the station of instructors 
in our schools. For the most part we have had teachers of 
experience and reputation, and in many districts have met 
with decidedly good success. 

Your committee have attended to the examination of teach- 
ers and we are happy to say that most of them have shown, 
by their knowledge of those branches prescribed by law, that 
they have had an idea of what a teacher's literary qualifica-' 
tions should be. 

We have attended to the duty of visiting the schools in the 
several districts, and we think that each school has been vis- 
ited, at least, three times during a term. We have endeav- 
ored to point out to teachers and scholars wherein they might 
improve, and have had no other object in so doing than the 
good of the school. 

In some instances when in our judgment the school deserved 
commendation, and a little of this would increase the stimulus 
already created, we have felt it a pleasure to express it, and 
when we have found occasion to point out where improve- 
ment could be made, we have not wished to have been under- 
stood as noticing nothing commendable ; and we believe that 
where suggestions have been made to teachers, or scholars, 
that these have been received with willingness of mind, and 
in many instances have improved thereby. 



15 

DISTRICT NO. 1.— Summer Term. 

This school had been previously under the tuition of a very 
successful teacher. And it is often observed by your commit- 
tee that where a teacher has had the entire confidence of 
parents and children, it requires more labor as well as for- 
bearance on the part of the one who follows. And we would 
say, that with this state of things, it is a more difficult task, for 
a new teacher with different ways to accomplish the same 
thing, to give satisfaction. The teacher was one of experi- 
ence and reputation. She succeeded in controling the school, 
and a good degree of proficiency was attained. 

Winter Term. — This school was commenced by a new 
teacher, whose success in other places gave assurance to your 
committee, that nothing short of a good school would be the 
.result of her effort. 

Here we would resort to the principle expressed in the 
statement made in the opening of this report, which was 
" that a teacher may give entire satisfaction in one school, 
and not in another." She was evidently a person of sufficient 
literary attainment to accomplish all that could be required 
of her, but did not succeed in maintaining that discipline in 
school, which is necessary that the scholars may be restrained 
from perverting the object for which money is expended on 
their behalf, and that they may bestow on their teacher that 
respect which. is her due. She voluntarily left the school, 
staying eleven and one-half weeks. The same school is now 
under the care of a gentleman, who, although encountering 
obstacles which are more generally coincident to a situation 
like this, is giving evidence that the school may be a prosper- 
ous one. 



DISTRICT NO. 2, Upper Department.— Summer Term. 

This school was commenced by one who has been emi- 
nently successful in another district, and consequently the 
expectations of your committee were considerably excited 
with the prospect of having a good school. In the opinion of 



16 

i 

the committee, this school was in a good degree a prosperous 
one, the teacher endeavoring to sustain a reputation already- 
acquired. We find here also that a teacher may have undis- 
turbed success in one district, while in another, circumstances 
may present themselves which will somewhat impair such 
teacher's reputation. This school continued three months, 
circumstances rendering it impracticable for her to continue 
the length of term for which she was engaged. Her place 
was rilled by one who had been formerly a teacher in the 
same school, and we would say that the same success followed 
her efforts, which has given your committee pleasure to speak 
of, in previous reports. 

Winter Term. — Your committee would frankly acknowledge 
that a mistake was made in not making more ample provision 
for the winter school, by the expenditure of too great a pro- 
portion of the money in the summer and fall terms, hence 
not giving to the older scholars that length of school, which 
justly belongs to them. 

This school was entered upon by a person who readily 
gained the respect of his pupils. Many of the scholars started 
with the intention of doing something, and hence it did not 
require compulsion on the part of the teacher to keep them 
at work. The school closed with a review of a part of the 
studies pursued, and in commenting on these recitations, we 
would say, that most of the pupils exhibited themselves to a 
good advantage. 



DISTRICT NO. 2.-— Primary Department. 
This school was under the care of the same teacher during 
the year. We would say that it made good proficiency in the 
first steps of acquiring an education, and as the old maxim 
expresses our sentiments, " like teacher, like scholars," so we 
would say that as there was on the part of the teacher a good 
degree of energy displayed, so we might expect on the part of 
the scholars something of the same spirit. 



17 

DISTRICT NO. 3.— Summer Term. 

Your committee feel themselves unable to give a definite 
report of this school, it having been under the care of the 
other member of the committee. We would make a general 
statement, reporting that we consider the school to have been 
a satisfactory one. We think that there is such a thing as a 
school continuing too long ; the scholars becoming weary lose 
their ambition, and by inconstancy lessen the average attend- 
ance, making it hard work for a teacher to keep up that inter- 
est which is necessary to good progress. We think that if 
the school had closed sooner, giving more money to have been 
expended during the winter, the arrangement would have 
given better satisfaction. 

Winter Term. — We would say that this school was visited 
by the present committee, and we are able to say, that in our 
opinion the school made good progress, the teacher laboring 
to press the scholars forward no faster, than they could well 
understand. We would say of this, in connection with other 
schools of the same character, that there were introduced by 
the teacher exercises of a rhetorical nature which tends to 
create activity, and drive off the monotony, which may hover 
around some of our school rooms. 

It gives your committee pleasure to speak of the school 
containing most of the older scholars of the district, and sup- 
ported mostly by individual subscriptions. We feel that we 
can commend the course the district has pursued in sustaining 
such a school, as also the success which has crowned the 
efforts of him who has had the charge of it. One of the prin- 
cipal features of this school was that the scholars were kept 
hard at work. It needs no argument on our part to convince 
others that here is one great secret of a teacher's success in 
governing a school, and also that a school of eleven weeks 
under these circumstances is worth more than sixteen weeks 
with moderate labor. 

The summer schoool in District No. 4, was under the care 
of a former teacher, and the pupils made good progress in the 
different branches pursued. 



IS 

The winter school was taught by a lady of limited experi- 
ence, and as some of the older scholars took advantage of this, 
before the term closed the want of discipline was severely felt. 
We notice on the Register that but one parent visited this 
school during the entire year. We do not think that any 
school can prosper as it should, unless the parents are suffi- 
ciently interested to visit it at least twice during each term. 

The school in District No. 5, was under the care of a former 
successful teacher and a graduate of the Normal school, both 
summer and winter. And as teacher and scholars were mutu- 
ally acquainted, no time was lost by the teacher in ascertain- 
ing the capacity of the pupils, but all went to work in ear- 
nest, and the progress which the school has made the past 
year should be an argument against changing teachers any 
oftener than is absolutely necessary for the good of the schools. 
Other things being equal, we think that the school which 
enjoys the labors of a successful teacher who understands 
thoroughly the mental capacities of each scholar, will have 
an advantage fully equal to twenty-five per cent, over that 
school which has a new teacher every term. 

In closing our report, we wish to speak of the interest mani- 
fested on the part of our inhabitants in the prosperity of our 
schools. We believe that our people are willing to make such 
sacrifices as are necessary to afford their children opportunities 
for gaining a good common school education. This is manifested 
in various ways ; in raising such sums of money as are neces- 
sary to meet the expenditures incident to the continuing of 
the schools a sufficient length of time. This interest is also 
expressed in visiting the schools, on the part of the districts. 
While we would not convey the impression that our citizens 
attend to this duty as much as might be profitable, (we would 
rather incite them to greater faithfulness in this respect,) still, 
by the perusal of our Registers, and the presence of so many 
persons at some of our examinations, we believe that most of 
our people do as well in this respect as in other places. 
Whether our success in the procuring of teachers has or has 
not been equal to that of previous years, we would notwith- 



19 

standing convey the impression, that we cannot place too high 
an estimate on the importance of securing the best of teach- 
ers. To say that we want persons of literary attainments, 
would not wholly meet our demands. While we must have 
this, with refinement, still we feel that the capacity to govern ; 
as also the faculty to look at obstacles which may exist as the 
child looks at them ; the power of drawing the affections ; 
the aptness to impart instruction, are of no less consequence. 
We would have our teachers carry about with them the 
impression that their pupils are looking upon them as models, 
and that wherever they may come in contact with them 
either in school or abroad, their impress is written upon 
the mind of the pupil. We would have them feel that their 
station is one of trust, of responsibility, a public station ; and 
one which will necessarily call out public expression, and 
while we would not wish to see an unbending rigidity on the 
part of the teacher, we would say that we* do like to see a 
proper dignity united with freedom, as also an ability, both in 
precept and practice, to impart that moral instruction, which 
is so necessary to a healthy moral influence. 

We cannot close this report without calling to mind the 
memory of one of our number who has for several years been 
a member, as well as chairman, of the board of this committee. 
We feel that we have been deprived of the counsel of one, 
whose judgment we have been wont to rely on; whose ability 
in those things which go to make an efficient committee, has 
called out not only our respect, but we are confident that his 
friendly advice, his cheering words to both teacher and schol- 
ar, and the generous impulse of his nature, will cause the 
memory of Joseph H. Knight to exist in the minds of a greater 
part of this community for a long time to come. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JAMES POKTER, ) School Committee 
E. L. HASTINGS, J of Hatfield. 



20 





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Annual ^Reports 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year ending 



MARCH 12, 1861 



NORTHAMPTON : 

PRINTED BY METCALF & COMPANY. 
1861. 



w. 



( I 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield : — 

In presenting to you the annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the town for the past year, we are happy 
to be able to do so with a balance in favor of the town in the 
Treasury, and, consequently, not having been obliged to avail 
ourselves of the vote of the town at the meeting in November 
last, to borrow a sufficient sum of money to meet any defi- 
ciencies of the Treasury which it was feared might occur by 
reason of the unusual number of poor persons that had been 
thrown upon the town for relief since the last annual meeting 
and for whom no appropriations had been made. 

The system which has so long been adopted by this town, 
in their corporate capacity, of " paying as they go" and avoid- 
ing all debts or obligations for future years or generations to 
cancel, is one that commends itself to every sound business 
man as the safest and wisest course to be pursued. 

The large amount of snow that has fallen during the past 
winter has rendered necessary the expenditure of more money 
than usual at that season of the year, to render the roads safe 
and convenient ; although some of the roads were temporarily 
obstructed, as must always be the case during a winter of 
deep and heavy snow, yet our surveyors have ever held them- 
selves in readiness to use all the means at their command for 
the removal of this and every other impediment of free and 
unobstructed travel, thereby protecting the town from com- 
plaint and prosecution, and the traveller from delays and 
injury. 

The bridges of the town have been under the care of the 
same Committee for the past two years, who have discharged 
their duties to the general acceptance. 

Israel G. Dickinson has performed his duties as Liquor 
Agent, with the faithfulness which he has exhibited in that 
office in former years ; he will report the condition of the 
Agency, at the annual meeting. 



We have caused guide boards to be prepared for the most 
important roads of the town, which will be erected as soon as 
the ground and weather will permit. 

In conformity to the vote of the town at the last annual 
meeting, we have procured an insurance upon the town hall, 
in the Farmers & Merchants Mutual Insurance Company of 
Worcester, for five years from the first day of May last, for 
fifteen hundred dollars. 

The town are now supporting, wholly or in part, seven 
individuals whose legal settlement is in this town : these are 
Sarah Green, Calvin Morton, Theodore Wells, Asa Wells, Anna 
Dickinson, Sophronia Vining and Oliver Bardwell. There is 
also a person, by the name of Lydia Potter, who resides in 
Boston, for whom we are obliged to pay about ten or twelve 
dollars per year, to provide her w T ith fuel. Besides these, the 
family of James Billings, whose legal settlement is in Shrews- 
bury, have been relieved, and are now at no farther expense 
to this town. Bathsheba Shumway, whose legal settlement 
is in Belchertown, is now supported by this town : the Over- 
seers of the Poor of Belchertown having been legally notified, 
have agreed to assume the expense of her support. 

Phileta P. Partridge, in June last, made application to us 
for relief, being sick and nearly helpless ; this individual is a 
native of the State of Vermont, as is also her father ; the 
town, at the last November meeting, instructed us to make 
an investigation to ascertain whether she had a legal settle- 
ment in any town of this Commonwealth ; in pursuance of 
these instructions, we have searched the records of Worcester 
county, and found that Jasper Partridge, the great grandfather 
of Phileta P., was a native of Medway, Mass., born in the 
year 1732, and that his father's name was Jonathan ; that in 
1758, Jonathan Partridge, then an inhabitant of Rutland Dis- 
trict, now called Barre, conveyed a tract of land containing 
52 acres and 88 rods, to Jasper Partridge, who is also des- 
cribed as of Rutland District. In 1762, Jasper Partridge 
conveyed a tract of land containing 52 acres, (supposed to be 
the same he received from his father,) to one Robert Patrick 
of Rutland ; also another tract, described as lying across 
Ware river, of 6 acres; in the deed of conveyance to Patrick, 



a dwelling house is mentioned as standing on the 52 acres. 
From these facts, it would seem that there could be no mis- 
take, but that the legal settlement of Phileta P. Partridge is 
in the town of Barre ; the early records of Rutland District 
having been burnt, we are unable to prove any thing from 
that source : the facts hereinstated have been placed before 
the Overseers of the Poor of Barre, who requested time to 
examine the facts in the case, and then they would inform us 
of their determination ; this pauper is the most expensive of 
any now supported by the town, her board alone costing two 
dollars and fifty cents per week. We suppose there are other 
facts that can be ascertained in reference to the case, if it 
should be thought advisable by the town to enforce by law 
their claim for remuneration for the expense incurred for her 
support against the town of her settlement ; but we thought 
it not best to be at any more expense in the search for evi- 
dence until the determination of the town of Barre was 
known. 

A second complaint was entered by us, as Selectmen, to 
the Grand Jury of the county, at their session last June, 
against James Morton, for enclosing certain portions of high- 
ways near the mills of Harvey Moore : a bill of indictment 
was found against him, for fencing up a portion of the Deer- 
field road adjoining the north abutment of the mill bridge. 
The case was continued to the December term of the Supe- 
rior Court : at that time, the District Attorney desired to 
have the trial of the indictment delayed, in order that he 
might obtain the decision of the Supreme Court in the case of 
James Morton against Harvey Moore, in which it is alleged 
by the counsel for the Defendant, that it* has been decided 
that Morton's fence for which he was indicted, is the bound 
of the highway. The case now stands continued to the crim- 
inal term of the Superior Court for next June. In order to 
ascertaiu as nearly as possible the true boundary of the high- 
way at the point in controversy, we have procured from two 
competent surveyors a survey of the road beginning at the 
terminus of the Deerfield road near the dwelling house of the 
late John Hubbard, and running northerly to a point near 
the house of Lewis Covill. From this survey, it scarcely 



6 

admits of a doubt, that the individual complained of, has 
enclosed a portion of the highway which, so far as the town 
is concerned, is of considerable value for the purpose of build- 
ing and repairing the mill bridge, which is the most expensive 
structure of the kind in the town. For any agricultural pur- 
pose whatever, this smalj piece of land is but of nominal 
value — we think that the interests of the town imperatively 
demand that their rights to the locality in question should be 
rigidly enforced, for if the claim of the defendant, as we 
understand it, is admitted, then it is only at great incon- 
venience and difficulty, that access can be had to and from 
the foundations of this bridge, without trespassing upon his 
land ; and although it has been suggested by some persons 
that James Morton is willing to give the town a right to pass 
over this land for the purpose above mentioned, yet we appre- 
hend that the town will never consent to part with a right 
which is as old as the road itself, and which no adjoining 
owner before the present one ever presumed to question, and 
accept in its stead a simple permit to pass over this piece of 
ground, which may be at any time abrogated or made the 
foundation of future controversy and litigation. 

We have paid all the bills against the town now due, that 
have come to our knowledge. The school in district No. 5 
not having closed, the money due that district has not been 
drawn from the treasury. There will also be due in the 
month of April, about one hundred dollars for the support of 
the poor; besides these, there will also be bills for printing, and 
for guide boards ; and also the Selectmen's bills for services, 
which will be presented to the annual meeting. The bill 
against the town of Belchertown for the support of Bathsheba 
Shumway, will probably be paid soon after the first of April. 
The claim of the town against the town of Barre now amounts 
to nearly one hundred and twenty dollars, which we hope 
will be paid without litigation. 

GEO. W. HUBBARD, ) Selectmen 
JAMES SCOTT, > of 

ELISHA HUBBARD, ) Hatfield. 

Hatfield, March 12, 1861. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance in the Treasury March 12, 1860, 
Amount of taxes assessed, 
Eeceived from State School Fund, 
for rent of Town Hall, 
" Dog licenses, 
" grass in cemetery, 
" sale of lots in cemetery, 
from Overseers of the Poor of Greenfield 
" " " " Shrewsbury 

C. D. Bartlett's order, included accidentally in last 
Keport, 

Amount, ' 



$357 21 


3971 


69 


49 


82 


29 


00 


7 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


7, 10 


00 


14 


00 


$4455 


72 



EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BILLS. 

Paid amount of old bills for 1859, not included in 

last Report, 9 60 

" Daniel A Vining, overwork on highways, 4 58 

" Metcalf & Co., for printing, 20 00 

" J. Lewis, for services as teacher in District No. 1, 35 00 

■& J. S. Graves, for boarding teacher, 14 00 

$83 18 



SCHOOLS. 






H. L. Russell, for services as teacher in '. 


Dist.No.l, $70 00 


J. Lewis, 


do. 




a 


1, 96 00 


A. F. Cook, 


do. 




a 


2, 75 00 


Mary E. Lyon, 


do. 




a 


2, 75 00 


J. A. Leach, 


do. 




a 


2, 91 50 


Mary F. Pomeroy, 


do. 




a 


3, 50 80 


A. S. Hardy, 


do. 




u 


3, 60 53 


Laura E. Bartlett, 


do. 




a 


3, 36 00 


A. A. Crafts, 


do. 




a 


4, 18 IS 


L. H. Whitman, 


do. 




a 


4, 33 00 


Helen M, Shepard, 


do. 




(t 


5, 63 00 


Jona. S. Graves, for boarding 


school teacher, 


81 00 


Temperance Morton, 




a 




53 25 


Moses C. Porter, 




a 




90 00 


Sam'l D. Bartlett, 




a 




56 00 


Foster C. Anderson, 




a 




39 75 


Henry D wight, 




(< 




47 25 


L. G. Curtis, for wood and cash 


paidforDist.No.l, 19 31 


Moses C. Porter, for 




ci 


a 


2, 22 11 


C. M. Billings, " 




u 


a 


2, 7 66 


Sam'l D. Bartlett," 




a 


u 


3, 19 50 


Foster C. Anderson, 




u 


a 


4, 1 46 


Caleb Dickinson, 




U 


a 


2, 3 97 




$1110 27 




POOR. 







Paid Horace "Wait, for keeping Sarah Green, $ 137 66 

" H. Anderson, " Calvin Morton, 22 50 

" H. Anderson, " Anna Dickinson, 37 50 

" F. C. Anderson, " Theo. Wells, 19 00 

" O. S. Vining, " Sophronia Vining, 31 50 

" P. Chapin, " Asa Wells, 20 00 



Paid RodolphusGraves,forkeepingPhileta P. Partridge, 80 00 

ft Silas Bardwell, " Oliver Bardwell, 75 00 

" 0. Marsh, " transient paupers, 4 75 

" James Morton, " James Billings and family, 15 00 

" Helen Shumway, for nursing B. Shumway, 7 50 

" Roswell Hubbard, " wood furnished B. Shumway, 9 00 

" D. F. Wells, " merchandise " " 16 65 

" H. P. & W. D. Billings, for boots furnished W. Wells,3 00 

" Overseers of the Poor of Greenfield, funeral 

expenses of Lewis Harris, 12 17 

" Dr. D. Thompson, medical advice for P. P. Partridge,5 00 

" Dr. C. N. Chamberlain, " " " 21 75 

" Dr. S. A. Fiske, " " B. Shumway, 2 00 



$519 98 



CONTINGENCIES. 



Paid Harvey Kirkland, for Insurance on Hall, $38 50 

" Densmore & Field, " repairing Hall, 1 75 

" J.T.&G. C.Fitch," plank, 75 00 

" Geo. Wait, for services as Assessor, 54 13 

" Leander Cooley, " " 57 30 

" John T. Fitch, " " 54 50 

" J. T. Tower, for labor on Hall, 42 93 

" Edwin Graves," " and cash paid, 38 02 

" A. M. Peck, overwork on highways, 25 17 

" A. M. Peck, labor on cemetery fence, &c. and 

cash paid, 2 03 

" Edwin Graves, for services in surveying, 29 25 

" Lemuel Cooley, " labor on Hall, and cash paid, 35 16 

" Z. W. Bartlett, for building West Brook bridge, 75 00 

" Dexter Allis, for services as committee on bridges, 3 50 

" Geo. Wait, " « " " 4 00 

" E. F. Cooley, overwork on highways, and lumber, 12 00 

" H. P. Billings, for services as Treasurer, 15 00 

" Wm. D. Billings, " Clerk, and cash paid, 24 95 

" H. S. Porter, for mowing old cemetery, 1 50 
2 



10 



Paid J.Porter, for services as School Com. in 1859-60, 30 00 

" E. L. Hastings, " " " 

" Adm'r of J. H. Knight, dec'd, " 1859, 

" A. E. Strong, for overwork on highways, 

" Win. P. Allis, " 

" E. Turner, " services in surveying, 

" Forbes & Spaulding, legal advice, 

" S. G. Hubbard, services surveying, 

" E. N. Sampson, collecting taxes, &c, 



Abatement of taxes, 
Paid County Tax, 
" State 



RECAPITULATION. 



Receipts into the Treasury, 

PAYMENTS BY THE TOWN. 
For Old Bills, 

" Schools, 

" Poor, 

" Contingencies, 

" County Tax, 

" State 

" Abatement of taxes, 



Amount in hands of Treasurer March 12, 1861, 
to new account, 



1.7 


25 


14 


50 


15 


51 


11 


38 


9 


50 


8 


00 


2 


00 


43 


88 


$741 71 


$23 27 


997 


82 


297 


50 



$4455 72 

$83 18 

1110 27 

519 98 

741 71 

997 82 

297 50 

23 27 

$3773 73 

$681 99 



GEO. W. HUBBARD, ) Selectmen 
JAMES SCOTT, > of 

ELISHA HUBBARD, ) Hatfield. 



H. P. BILLINGS, Treasurer. 
March 12, 1861. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Of the Town of Hatfield, 1860-61. 



Your Committee, in reviewing the year that is past, take 
pleasure in reporting, that the Schools in this town have made 
in many material respects, marked advances. 

Good order, with a mild system of discipline, under thor- 
ough teachers, has enabled all the schools to exhibit a credit- 
able degree of progress, in the various studies pursued. At 
the same time, unavoidable causes have operated to produce 
a marked difference in the degree of progress. Some schools 
have been under the instruction of the same teacher through- 
out the year, while others have changed teachers every 
term — some have had too many scholars, some too few 
— some schools have been graded in such manner as to 
add to the interest of teacher and pupil, while in others, the 
teacher was expected to turn his attention, at any moment, 
from the a-b, ab, of an infant scholar, to abstruse questions in 
the higher mathematics. Your Committee feel confident that 
part at least of these evils can be remedied in the future. 

A teacher, in the course of a term, becomes acquainted 
with, not only the face, but the mind and disposition of each 
pupil, so that at the commencement of a second term both 
are prepared to commence, and go forward from the point 
where the end of the previous term left them ; whereas, a 
new teacher has much ground to go over, much time to spend, 
before he can fairly become an instructor. The progress made 
by the schools under female teachers in the Centre District, 
was undoubtedly owing in part to the fact that the same 
teachers have been employed through the year. It cannot be 
too strongly urged that teachers who have given good satis- 
faction should certainly be retained for the ensuing term ; to 



12 

enable the Prudential Committee to do this, it may be neces- 
sary, in some districts, to change the time for choosing that 
officer. 

We are aware that in most cases the evils arising from the 
want of a sufficient number of scholars, and also those arising 
from too great a number, are incident to our scattered popu- 
lation, and the distance apart of the several districts. Thus 
District No. 4 has so few scholars that schools cannot be 
maintained as long as they should, without a burdensome tax 
upon the inhabitants of the district ; at the same time, so 
remote are they from other districts, that no benefit can be 
derived from a union with others. 

The schools in Pantry district have suffered from a state of 
things differing somewhat from those in West Brook, there 
not being scholars enough for two schools, yet so many are 
crowded into their one small inconvenient room, that it is 
only through the excellent management of superior teachers, 
that any thing can be accomplished. We hope that when 
the new school house, now talked of in that district, shall be 
decided upon, that a commodious house will be erected, with 
two rooms, — then if the district cannot support two schools, 
the teacher seeking assistance from the older pupils, will be 
able to do better justice to the whole school — a plan similar 
to the one adopted with such eminent success in the State 
Normal schools. 

The evils resulting from the " mixed" system have been 
fully exemplified by the Winter school in the Hill district, 
where, notwithstanding the earnest labors of an excellent 
teacher, the school has been only partially successful. It is 
simply impossible for a teacher to give his time and attention 
to explanations needed by the older scholars, while he is sur- 
rounded by a room full of small children, who can only be 
kept in order, (such is the experience of all teachers,) by 
being continually interested ; equally impossible is it for a 
teacher to interest and keep in order a school of young schol- 
ars, and at the same time give advanced classes the attention 
and assistance necessary. 



13 

The Hill district, by uniting with the Centre, might secure 
the advantages of a High school for their more advanced 
scholars, thereby, during the Winter term, relieving their now 
crowded school room, and rendering unnecessary the employ- 
ment of a teacher of the eminent literary qualifications of the 
one employed the past Winter, and, while a female teacher 
would be amply qualified to take charge of the smaller schol- 
ars, the saving in teachers' wages might be applied to the 
union school : the advantages of a plan similar to this, are so 
apparent, they need not here be enumerated. 

The North Centre and Farms Districts have given to 
their scholars additional schooling, by a liberal private sub- 
scription ; this, with the adoption of the " grade system" for 
the Upper department, and the employment of superior teach- 
ers, has enabled the schools in those districts to make rapid 
advance. 

The average of attendance in our schools has not been as 
high as we could have wished ; this has been owing to the 
prevalence of disease, that by the dispensation of an overruling 
Providence has prevented many from punctual attendance, 
while some have been removed by death. 

In our haste to advance in school education, there seems to 
be a tendency to neglect the primary branches ; the import- 
ance of a thorough education in reading and spelling cannot 
be too highly appreciated ; especially would we call attention 
to reading, which we find is more apt to be neglected, per- 
haps because so very few of public instructors are themselves 
good readers. Beading is an art, in which, unless a teacher 
can instruct by example, he can never hope to make profi- 
cients of his pupils. This is a point in the qualifications of 
teachers that we trust will not be neglected by those who 
employ them. 

We cannot close this report without urging upon parents 
the importance of frequently visiting the school room ; a good 
school cannot be maintained, without a hearty co-operation 
of teacher and parent ; and you can in no way understand so 
well what your school is doing, what its requirements are, as by 



14 

frequently visiting it ; it is a duty that you owe to yourselves 
and your children, that you should see, and judge for your- 
selves, how and in what manner that person employed by you 
for a limited time, and for a specific purpose, discharges the 
obligations resting upon him. Visit the school, and you can 
then appreciate, as you can in no other way, the effects of a 
crowded room ; the actual loss of time in a mixed school ; the 
almost utter impossibility of a large school making progress, 
without the maintainance of good order. Visit the school 
room, and your presence will always have a good influence 
upon teacher and pupil, and if you would have that influence 
lasting, let your visits be neither few nor far between. 

From the peculiar circumstances of Districts 1 and 5, the 
amount liable to be drawn from the Treasury by those dis- 
tricts, has not all been expended. We would recommend 
that a part, or the whole of such unexpended portion be 
donated to, District No. 4, to be used for school purposes the 
ensuing year. 

With the exception of District No. 4, the length of schools 
has been satisfactory, and as there is no reason to expect 
increased expense, we would recommend that the same 
amount as last year be raised for the year to come. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

E. L. HASTINGS, {School Committee 
EDWIN GRAVES, ) 0j ±ia ^ ieUi ' 

Hatfield, March 15, 1861. 



15 



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132,00 

63,00 65,00 

60,00 68,25 

126,00 

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f 130,00 
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57,00 
113,25 

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02 


School taught by 


Harriett L. Russell. 
James Lewis. 
Mary E. Lyoa. 
Angela F. Cook. 
Joseph A. Leach. 
Mary F. Pomeroy. 
Laura E. Bartlett. 
Asa S. Hardy. 
Annette A. Crafts. 
Lucretia H. Whitman. 
Helen M. Shepherd. 
Elvira A. Elwell. 


Districts. 


No. 1, Hill, 

No. 1, Hill, 

No. 2, S. Centre, 
*No. 2, N. Centre, 

No. 2, UpperDep't, 

No, 3, Farms, 

No. 3, Farms, 
tNo. 3, UpperDep't, 

No. 4, W. Brook, 

No. 4, W. Brook, 

No. 5, Pantry, 

No. 5, Pantry, 



REPORTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen and School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR 1861-62. 



NORTHAMPTON! 

TRUMBULL &, GERE, PRINTERS. 

1862. 



Report of the Selectmen. 



At the close of another financial year we submit the follow- 
ing Report of the Receipts and Disbursements of the town 
for the past year. In settlement with the Treasurer we find in 
his hands $61.14, and due on the tax-bills uncollected, $159.30. 
There are bills due and not presented for schools and paupers, 
probably to the amount of something over $300. We have 
changed the former practice of the town in relation to the 
support of paupers. We thought it would be more economi- 
cal and less trouble to the Overseers of the Poor, to have 
them congregated together. "We accordingly made an 
arrangement with Herrick Anderson, to keep all the perma- 
nent ones at a stipulated price per year, and transient ones 
for a reasonable compensation. Two of the most expensive, 
viz : Mrs. Yining and Phileta Partridge, we have removed 
from the list. 

The bill against the town of Belchertown, mentioned in 
last report, has been paid. The claim of the town against 
the town of Barre has been settled in our favor by process of 
law ; the agent, Gr. W. Hubbard, will report at the proper 
time. 

In addition to the sums above named, there will be the 
Selectmen's bills for services and the printing of this report. 



On the 15th of April, on the breaking out of the great 
rebellion, the President ealled on the country for volunteers 
to defend the Capital from invasion by the rebels. Massachu- 
setts in accordance with her previous history, was first in the 
field, and on the 19th of April, her sons fell in the streets of 
Baltimore. Our people in the fervor of their patriotism, 
called a town meeting and appropriated the sum of $5000 for 
the benefit of those who should enlist and their families, and 
chose a Committee of seven to dispense it according to their 
discretion. In accordance with the above vote, the Committee 
borrowed the sum of $800 and appropriated it for the purposes 
above named, aside from a sum in the hands of the Commit- 
tee sufficient to pay interest and necessary expenses. We have 
in the field under the flag of our country, twenty-eight recruits, 
who we are confident will render good service to their 
country. There is now due to families of volunteers, $184.98, 
after deducting twelve dollars, having paid Mrs. Puffer up to 
January 1, 1862. There will be due to families, $56 per 
month, so long as they continue in service. They have not 
been paid, with the exception of $12 to Mrs. Puffer, for the 
reason that there has been no money appropriated by the 
town. 

The sums paid to volunteers will eventually be reimbursed 
by the State ; the town will judge respecting the proper way 
to raise it. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in Treasury March 12, 1861, #681 99 

Amount of Taxes assessed, 4804 52 

Received from State School Fund, 44 85 

" " Dog Licenses, 2 00 

»" " Overseers Poor, Belchertown, 186 55 

" " Guardian Sarah Horton, 53 51 



$5773 48 



EXPENDITURES. 

OLD BILLS. 
Paid Old Bills for I860, 
" Foster C. Anderson, for keeping Paupers, 
" H. W. Field, land damages, 
44 Oliver S. Vining, Paupers, 

" Dr. N. Gilman, medical advice for Mrs. Shumway, 
44 Herrick Anderson, for keeping Paupers, 
" O. Marsh, for keeping transient Paupers, 
44 D. F. Wells, 

44 G. W. Hubbard, bal. due for keeping Asa Wells, 
44 O. M. Billings, wood for District No. 2, 



19 


00 


50 


00 


5 


50 


20 


00 


25 


00 


7 25 


5 


95 


3 


51 


7 


66 



8470 19 



POOR. 
Paid Rodolphus Graves, for keeping Phileta P. Partridge, 

(t (< t( a a a ■ a 

44 Overseers Poor, Boston, for keeping Lydia Potter 

44 O. Marsh, for keeping transient Paupers, 

44 Dr. R. Spaulding, medical advice for Harriet Wheeler 

44 44 44 44 44 u Mrs. Shumway, 

44 Dr. A. Montville, 44 " 44 Jack Wheeler, 

44 Roswell Hubbard, cash paid for Mrs. Shumway, 

44 44 44 pants for Wm. Wells, 

44 . C. Colton, coffin for Mrs. J. Peck, 

i( Horace Wait, for keeping Sarah Green, 

44 Silas Bardwell, for keeping Oliver Bardwell, 

44 Insane Hospital, Northampton, for Mrs. Justus Morton 

44 44 " 44 " Francis Abbott, 

44 Herrick Anderson, support of Poor, 



$604 00 

The following named paupers are being kept for the sums annexed 
to their names, per annum : — Sarah Green, 8100 ; Calvin Morton, 
52 ; Anna Dickinson, 65 ; Theodore Wells, 52 ; Asa Wells, 52. 



SCHOOLS. 

PaidE. L. Mann, for services as teacher in District No. 1, $134 00 

44 Mary C. Billings, 44 44 44 44 1, 47 25 

44 H. L. Russell, 44 " " 44 2, 39 00 



830 00 


55 


72 


12 


87 


11 


55 


, 9 


00 


26 


75 


20 


00 


84 


47 


1 


50 


5 


00 


18 


00 


75 


00 


n, 53 


57 


50 


57 


150 


00 



Carried forward, 



8220 25 



SCHOOLS— CONTINUED. 

Amount brought forward, 
Paid A. F. Cook, for services as teacher in District No. 

44 P. A. Williams, 4t 4k " 

44 J. A. Leach, " " 

44 Hattie S. Belden, " 44 

44 Sarah M. Smith, 44 

44 John Avery, 44 " 

44 L. H. Whitman, 44 " 

44 E. A. Elwell, 

44 E. N. Sampson, for boarding teacher, 

14 Mary S. Billings, 4t 44 

44 S. G. Hubbard, 

44 Laura Bliss, 

44 Temperance Morton, 44 44 

44 D. F. Wells, 

44 Sanford Belden, 

44 R. H. Belden, 

44 D. A. Vining, 4t 

44 C. P. Bardwell, 

44 E. N. Sampson, for wood for schools, 

44 D. F. Wells, 

44 Wm. H. Dickinson, 

44 J. E. Wight, 

44 D. A. Vining, 





$220 25 


s T o. 2, 


74 50 


44 2, 


36 00 


44 2, 


90 00 


44 3, 


42 00 


44 3, 


30 00 


" 3, 


35 00 


44 4, 


27 00 


" 5, 


70 00 




63 50 




31 50 




27 00 




24 00 




26 67 




59 20 




28 00 




24 00 




21 00 




52 25 




27 25 




10 00 




20 00 




31 33 




6 00 




$1076 45 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Paid E. L. Hastings, services as School Committee, $21 00 

44 Edwin Graves, 4i 4 < 44 29 50 

44 Roswell Hubbard, bounty paid for crows, 3 50 

44 Moses Kingsley, mowing burial ground, 1 50 

44 Geo. W. Hubbard, cash paid A. 11. Field, for surveying, 12 00 

44 Horace Waite, bounty for 3 crows, 37 

44 Dwight Morton, bounty for 7 crows, 87 

44 Henry S. Porter, for plank, 59 92 

44 Horace Waite, for repairing bridges, 14 04 

44 C. L. Coleman, " 44 45 39 

44 C. L. Coleman, 44 44 49 00 

44 W. B. & C. L. Coleman, rep. 44 12 00 

44 George Waite, services as Committee on bridges, 8 00 

44 Dexter Allis, " " 44 12 12 



Carried forward, 



$269 21 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES— continued. 
Amount brought forward, 
Paid Calvin B. Marsh, for lan.d damages, 
W. H. Dickinson, 
Arnold M. Peck, for hearse, 
R. Hubbard, cash paid damages assessed to Mrs. Loud 

West Farms, 
Lemuel Cooley, 

Lemuel Cooley, removal of Phileta P. Partridge, 
I. R. Jones, painting Town Hall, 
Edwin M. Eaton, for services as Assessor, 
J. T. Fitch, 

Edwin Graves, " " M 

J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for lumber, 

it t< (t a u 

" " " " building School House, Dis 

trict No. 5, 
E. N. Sampson, costs of suit, S. P. Billings, 

D. F. Wells, for sealing weights and measures, 
" " " services as Treasurer, 

E. N. Sampson, services as Collector, 
W. D. Billings, services as Town Clerk, 
John Child, for stone for bridge, 
Mrs. Puffer, wife of T. Puffer, in the army, 
R. H. Belden, services as School Committee, 
Calvin Marsh, over-work on highway, 



$269 21 

31 00 
26 00 

206 00 

32 00 
2 50 

15 50 
4 50 
38 25 
40 40 
29 17 
63 07 
31 82 



450 00 
4 28 



8 


00 


15 


00 


42 


63 


26 


15 


15 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


32 



$1386 80 



Abatement of Taxes, 
Discount " 

Paid County Tax, 
" State 



$26 11 

387 36 

1245 13 

357 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Receipts into the Treasury, $5773 48 



PAYMENTS BY THE TOWN. 



Old Bills, 
Poor, 
Schools, 
Contingencies, 
County Tax, 
State Tax, 

Abatement of Taxes, 
Discount " 



$5553 04 
Amount in hands of Treasurer, March 12, 

1862, to new account, 61 14 

Amount uncollected by E. N. Sampson, 159 30 

$5,773 48 



$470 


19 


604 


00 


1076 


45 


1386 


80 


1245 


13 


357 


00 


26 


11 


387 


36 



MOSES MOKTON, ) Selectmen 

LEMUEL COOLEY, [ of 
KOSWELL HUBBAKD, ) Hatfield. 

D. F. WELLS, Treasurer. 



Hatfield, March 12, 1862. 



Report of the School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

1861-62. 



The Board of School Committee was organized April 15, 
1861, by the choice of E. L. Hastings, Chairman ; Edwin 
Graves, Secretary. 

In accordance with the law of this Commonwealth, we 
submit the following report. 

No. 1, Hill District. — Summer Term. — This school was 
kept by a person who claimed to have had considerable expe- 
rience in teaching. She readily gained the good will of her 
scholars, and as they were all young, she had fair success. 
The examination passed off tolerably well. 

Winter Term — Upper Department. — This school was under 
the care of the same teacher. With less than half the num- 
ber of scholars in the summer school, and many of them 
more advanced. Your Committee think that not as much pro- 
gress was made as should have been, or as the District had 
reason to expect. True, the scholars went over ground 
enough, but there was not that thoroughness, either of 
instruction or discipline, that marks the successful teacher. 



2 

Lower Department. — This school was taught by one who 
has been very successful in teaching the younger scholars, and 
as usual, her school made good progress. 

No. 2, South Center.-— The Summer term was under the 
care of a person who enjoys the reputation of being a thor- 
ough teacher; and the visits of the Committee, and the 
examination of the school, fully sustained that reputation. 

The Winter term opened with a new teacher. The number 
of scholars was not large. The examination passed off very 
well, though the scholars seemed to have been specially 
prepared. 

North Center. — This school has been under the charge of 
the same teacher for the last two years. She, in discipline, 
mild but firm, with the love of the pupils and the respect of 
their parents, made this school one of the best. 

Center. — -Winter term.— This school was taught by the 
same gentleman that had the charge of it one year ago. He 
gave good satisfaction then, and he has again proved himself a 
most thorough and successful teacher. 

No. 3, West Farms.— The Summer term was taught by a 
resident of the district and a graduate of the Normal school. 
She succeeded in infusing her own energy into the minds of 
her pupils, and we think that we express the minds of all who 
visited the school, by saying that it was a success. 

Winter Term — Lower Department. — This school opened 
under favorable prospects with a new teacher, but by the time 
the school was fairly started, sickness and death in her father's 
family interrupted the school for a few days and the continued 
illness of another member of the family caused constant 
anxiety. But notwithstanding this, the examination showed 
that good progress had been made. 

The Upper Department was under the charge of a graduate 
of Amherst College, and one who has the reputation of being 
a thorough scholar. We believe he gave good satisfaction ; 



but as he closed his school suddenly and without an examina- 
tion, we have no means of comparing the progress of this 
with the school of the previous year. 

No. 4, West Brook.- — The Summer term was taught by the 
teacher of the previous Winter term. Her success was fair, 
but the examination proved that the pupils had not been as 
thoroughly drilled as was desirable. 

For the Winter term, the district secured a Normal teacher 
of some experience. Perfectly at home in the school-room, 
she has secured the affections of her pupils, and we think that 
this school has made good progress in all its studies. 

No. 5, Pantry. — Summer term. — This school, under the 
care of a former teacher, opened in the old, small and incon- 
venient school-room, but toward the close of the term 
removed into the new house. Good discipline and thorough 
instruction were marked features of this school, and it appear- 
ed well at all times when visited by the Committee. 

The 'Winter term opened with a new and experienced 
teacher, and by far the largest school in town. Under good 
discipline and thorough instruction, this school has made as 
good progress in the various studies as other schools with half 
the number of scholars. 

In conclusion, although retrenchment seems to be a neces- 
sary virtue at the present time, we trust that the voters of 
this town will see that the cause of education does not suffer 
by neglecting to provide for its support. And we recommend 
that the same amount as • last year be raised for the year to 
come. 

E. L. HASTINGS, ) 

EDWIN GKAVES, \ School Committee. 

JOHN M. GEEENE, ) 

Hatfield, March 21, 1862. 



J25 



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$96 00 $98 00 
78 25 
66 00 

63 00 62 17 
70 00 

54 00 

48 00 

72 00 
117 50 

96 00 


•stunora 
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JO* I£»3U91 


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73 


^CO CO CO CO <M <M «* -*t< 

th eo co co co io 


School taught by 


Emma L. Mann. 
Mary C. Billings. 
Harriet L. Russell. 
Phila A. Williams. 
Joseph A. Leach. 
Angela F. Cook. 
Hattie S. Belden. 
Sarah M. Smith. 
John Avery. 
Lucretia H. Whitman. 
Emeline E. Rose. 
Elvira A. Elwell. 
Sarah M. Bryant. 


Districts. 




No. 1, Hill. 
No. 1, Hill. 
No. 2, So. Center. 
No. 2, " <« 
No. 2, Upper Dep. 
No. 2, No. Center. 
No. 3, Farms. 
No. 3, " 
No. 3, Up'r Dep't. 
No. 4, W. Brook. 
No. 4, " 
No. 5, Pantry. 
No. 5, " 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



SELECTMEN 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year ending March 20, 1863. 



nor thampton: 

TRUMBULL <fc, GERE, PRINTERS. 

1863. 



i 



REPORT. 



It becomes our duty at the close of another financial year, to re- 
port the transactions of the town for the past year. 

The war for the suppression of the rebellion has been continued 
through the year ; and it is well to review the past, and record the 
part which the town has taken to sustain the government. From the 
commencement of the war to the present time, our town has been 
earnest in the cause of the Union, and has nobly responded to the 
calls of the government for volunteers, and our citizens have come 
forward, to do their whole duty to their country in the existing cri- 
sis, and have enlisted to the number of eighty-one in the military 
service of the country. We will not attempt to find words, to ex- 
press the praise that is due to those who have left their homes and 
friends, to expose themselves to the dangers of the battle-field, and to 
the hardships of the camp. Those who have died from wounds re- 
ceived in battle, or from sickness, will long be remembered ; and 
their good name, and brave deeds, will be their best eulogy. 

At the commencement of the year it was supposed that the rebell- 
ion would soon be subdued, and that there would not be any neces- 
sity for a further call for soldiers ; but subsequent events proved 
that the strength, and resources of the rebellious states had been 
underrated. Early in July, the President of the United States issued 
an order, calling for three hundred thousand volunteers, to serve 
three years, or during the war. The proportion assigned to Massa- 
chusetts was fifteen thousand men. On the 7th of July an order was 
issued by the Governor of the Commonwealth, giving the proportion 
of each city and town, based upon the men enrolled in the state lia- 
ble to do military duty, as shown by the annual returns made by the 
assessors. 

On the eighteenth day of July, a town meeting was called, to con- 
sider the subject of raising volunteers, and the expediency of offer- 
ing a bounty to those who should enlist from the town. At a 
very full meeting it was voted that the committee chosen May 
6, 1861, consisting of Moses Morton, George Wait, Elijah Bard well, 



Erastus Cowles, J. D. Billings, George W. Hubbard and Wm. H. 
Dickinson, be authorized to borrow a sufficient sum of money to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of those who should enlist 
to make out the town's proportion, (sixteen men.) An enlistment 
roll was presented, and sixteen of our citizens came* forward and sub- 
scribed their names to the roll before the close of the meeting. 

On the 4th of August, a call was made by the President for three 
hundred thousand additional men to serve for nine months, who 
were to be drafted in accordance with orders from the war depart- 
ment, and the laws of the several states. The number of men which 
Massachusetts was called upon to furnish, was nineteen thousand 
and eighty. By an additional order from the war department, the 
several cities and towns were to have an allowance for all volunteers 
previously furnished, and mustered into service, whose stipulated term 
of service should not have expired. A new enrollment of the militia 
was ordered, and drafting commissioners were appointed to revise the 
rolls. After a hearing upon applications for exemptions, and the 
rolls revised, the apportionment was made of the whole quota re- 
quired of each town from the commencement of the war, and credits 
were given for those who had been previously mustered into the ser« 
vice. In this town the subject- of exemptions being unpopular, those 
who were really unfit for military duty were left on the militia roll, 
while in many towns, more attention was given to the business, and 
certificates of exemption were procured, thus increasing our quota to 
twenty-four men, in addition to those already in the service, which 
was supposed to be more than our proportion. 

At a meeting of the town held on the 25th of August, the same 
bounty was offered as on the previous call, and the same committee 
authorized to borrow money, and pay the bounties. Our quota was 
promptly filled by the young men of the town, thus obviating the 
necessity of a draft, and sustaining the reputation of the town for 
being one of the first to fill its quota. 

Another draft was ordered on the 17th of Nov. to make up a defi- 
ciency of two thousand men in the state. A final revision of the 
militia roll was ordered previous to the apportionment of the quotas, 
and further efforts were made to have our roll corrected, thus making 
our whole quota seventy-four (seven less than the town had fur- 
nished.) 

At the last annual meeting the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
such sums of money as might be necessary to pay the state aid 
granted to families of volunteers. In conformity with said vote the 
treasurer has borrowed two thousand dollars, and such aid has been 
paid to twenty-three families during the year. The whole amount 
disbursed is eighteen hundred thirty-six dollars and twenty cents, 
which includes the sums due at the commencement of the year. 
Twenty-one families are now receiving aid at an expense of about 
one hundred and ninety dollars a month. The sums paid to families 
of volunteers will be reimbursed by the state. The notes given by 



the war committee, for bounties and other expenses, previous to the 
18th of July, have been paid. There is still due forty-one hundred 
dollars, and interest, for which the committee have given their notes. 
An act to legalize the doings of towns in aid of the war, has passed 
both branches of the Legislature, and was approved by the governor 
Feb. 27, 1863. 

In consequence of the great freshet in the spring of the year, the 
Highways and Bridges were left in a very bad condition, and it re- 
quired a large expenditure to render them safe for public travel. The 
culvert at Dewey's Hole was entirely washed away, and we thought 
that it would be good economy for the town, to have it rebuilt in a 
more durable manner. Proposals were received for building the cul- 
vert and grading the road, and the contract was given to Robert R. 
Mayers, for two hundred and fifty dollars. Hill Bridge was consider- 
ably injured by the freshet, and one of the abutments was under- 
mined, so as to make it necessary to relay a part of it. The timbers 
of the old bridge were in such a decayed condition, that it was 
thought unsafe for the public travel, and a new bridge was built as 
soon as possible, so as not to obstruct the travel longer than neces- 
sary. Brook Hollow Bridge fell while a team was crossing, but for- 
tunately no one was very much injured. The other bridges of the 
town were repaired under the direction of the highway surveyors, 
without any additional expense to the town, except for timber and 
plank. The damage to the highway at the south end of Main street 
was repaired under the superintendence of the surveyor, O. Shum- 
way, at a cost of eighty-four dollars and thirty-six cents, above what 
was expended from his tax bill. 

The expenditures for paupers have been some less than they were 
last year Calvin Morton died on the 25th of May. By the death 
of Silas Bardwell, his contract with the town for the support of Oli- 
ver Bardwell for seventy-five dollars per year, terminated. Conse- 
quently we have paid the bill of one hundred dollars, to the Insane 
Asylum at Brattleboro, but the town will eventually receive about 
seventy-five dollars from the estate of Mr. Bardwell. There will be 
due on the 1st of April, a bill for the support of Sarah Morton, 
which will be paid by her guardian, G. W. Hubbard. There will 
be a bill from Dr. Harwood for attendance on Calvin Morton, and 
also one for wood for District No. 1 ; besides these there will be a 
bill for printing this Report, and also the selectmen's bills for servi- 
ces, which will be presented to the town at the annual meeting. All 
the other bills against the town, that have come to our knowledge 
have been paid. 



EXPENDITURES. 

OLD BILLS. 

Paid John T. & Geo. C. Fitch for lumber, $14 99 

Elijah N. Sampson, taking F. Abbott to hospital, 1 50 

Elijah Bard well, repairing town hall, 17 00 

A. M. Peck, services rendered, 3 00 

Maria Conkey, abatement of taxes, 85 

Herrick Anderson, keeeping paupers, 189 63 

Geo. W. Hubbard, defending suit in Barre case, 128 74 

" Moore's mill case, 5 60 

Dr. Myron Harwood, attendance on paupers, 9 65 

John E. Doane, services as constable, 2 25 

D. A. Vining, for School Dist. No. 4, 82 25 
C. P. Bardwell, for School Dist. No. 5, 129 81 
Moses Morton, services as selectman, 40 50 
Roswell Hubbard, services as selectman and money paid, 34 63 
Lemuel Cooley, services as selectman, 13 25 
Insane Asylum, support of Sarah Morton, 74 98 

" F. Abbott, 49 96 

C. P. Bardwell, overwork on highways, 10 00 

Delano & Turner, council fee in Barre case, 30 00 

Forbes & Spaulding, " 165 43 
Dr. G. N. Chamberlain, medical attendance on Phileta 

Partridge, 24 68 
Lemuel A. Wait, overwork on highways, 16 93 
Edwin Graves, services as school committee, 25 00 
" cash paid for charts, 4 56 
Rev. J. M. Green, services as school committee, 21 00 
Dr. A. Montville, medical attendance for Norman Pot- 
ter and Selah Wheeler, 45 00 
School committee for books, 19 40 
O. Marsh, keeping transient paupers, 2 25 
H. S. Porter, for services as elector, 15 00 

E. L. Hastings, for services as school committee, 24 00 
Trumbull & Gere, for printing selectmen's report, 8 00 
Roswell Hubbard, for Jack Wheeler, 78 00 
Elisha Wells, bounty for crows, 25 





$1,288 09 


PAUPERS. 




Paid H Anderson for support of Calvin Morton, 

Theodore Wells, 
" ** Sarah Green, 
" " Ann Dickinson, 


$11 88 

65 38 

101 50 

74 24 



Amount carried forward, 



8253 00 



Amount brought forward, 
Paid H. Anderson for extra care of paupers when sick, 
R. H. Belden, funeral expenses of C. Morton, 
Insane Asylum for support of F. Abbott, 

" " Sarah Morton, 

O. Marsh, keeping transient paupers, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, clothing for Wm. Wells, 
Dr. A. Montville, medical attendance for Selah Wheeler, 26 
Insane Asylum, Brattleboro, for Oliver Bard well, 
D. F. Wells, clothing for Wm. Wells, 



&253 


00 


10 


00 


7 


00 


147 


37 


78 


15 


2 


25 


8 


37 


', 26 


50 


100 


00 


4 


05 



8636 69 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 
Paid R. R. Mayers, building culvert at Dewey's Hole, 
Bradford Smith, for laying abutments at Hill Bridge, 
Patrick Mallony, for labor " " 

J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch for lumber and stone " 

" for lumber for bridges, ' 

W. Herrick, for bolts and washers, 
L. B. Field for labor on Hill Bridge, 

Brook Hollow Bridge, 
James Ryan, for earth, 
O. Shumway, for cash paid repairing road at south end 

of Main street, 
R. H. Belden, services as bridge committee & cash paid 
W. H. Dickinson, 
John T. Fitch, 
N. Abells, for drawing bolts, 
D. F. Wells, for nails 

S. P. Billings, for lumber and drawing stone, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, plank and lumber, 



Special appropriation. 
Paid Harvey Moore, as per vote of town, 



$250 00 


25 


25 


14 


00 


110 


63 


33 


00 


24 


59 


33 


50 


8 


67 


10 


00 


84 


36 


I 12 


00 


14 


17 


6 


50 




75 




45 


23 


79 


30 


73 


$682 39 


50 


00 



SCHOOLS. 
District No. 1. 
Paid Emma Rose for services as Teacher, 
Martha Gardner " 
Lucy S. Cooley " 

Solomon Graves for boarding teacher, 
H. S. Porter for boarding teachers, 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch for wood, 



$59 99 


48 


00 


40 


00 


32 


00 


80 


00 


16 


00 



$275 99 



8 



District No. 2. 
Paid Fanny Graves for services as teacher and board, 
Mary A. Cooley, for services as teacher, 
Sarah M. Smith, « " 

Walter M. Howland, " " 

David F. Wells, for boarding teacher, 
Mrs. Laura Bliss, " 

L. S. Bliss, " 

" for money paid for sawing wood, 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for wood, 



District No. 3. 
Paid Sarah M. Smith, for services as teacher, 
Sarah M.Hall, 
DeWittS. Clark, 

R. H. Belden, for boarding teacher, 
H. W. Field, for boarding teachers, 
John W. Field, for wood, 



District No. 4. 
Paid Annetta Crafts, for services as teacher, 
Emma Rose, " 

E. C. Anderson, for boarding teacher, 
Jerome W. King, " 

H. Anderson, for wood, 



District No. 5. 
Paid Fidelia A. Bryant, for services as teacher, 
E. N. Billings, « 

Ellen M. Frary, 

P. L. Strong, for boarding teachers, 
" wood, 



$135 


00 


33 


00 


41 


75 


75 


00 


36 


00 


27 


00 


33 


75 


9 


75 


36 


00 


$426 75 


$30 00 


30 


00 


13 


86 


24 


00 


54 


00 


27 


29 


$179 


15 


24 


00 


56 


00 


18 


00 


24 


50 


6 


07 


128 


57 


$17 50 


42 


00 


51 


25 


82 


94 


20 


00 



$213 69 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 
Paid G. W. Hubbard, committee on Allis case, 
" services in Barre case, 

J. E. Doane for services as constable, 
C. S. Jones for repairs on Town Hall, 
Metcalf & Co. for printing military notices, 

Amount carried forward, $21 53 



$9 


00 


3 


00 


2 


25 


4 


78 


2 


50 



Amount brought forward, 
Paid H. S. Porter for services as elector, 
S. G. Hubbard for services as assessor, 
H. W. Field 

Caleb Dickinson " 

Wm. D.Billings for services as town clerk, 
E. N. Sampson for services as collector and constable, 
David F Wells for services as treasurer, 
For burying ground fence, 



$21 


53 


12 


00 


35 


50 


23 


07 


34 


50 


24 


45 


48 


13 


15 


00 


22 


96 



$237 14 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 

Paid Holyoke Bank note, 503 37 

Savings Bank note, 309 00 

interest, 30 00 

D. F. Wells for cash paid for interest, 5 65 



$848 02 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 
Paid P. L. Strong, 
Patrick Boyle, 
Volunteers, as per vote of the town, 



$2 00 

97 

89 36 



$92 33 



STATE AID ADVANCED TO FAMILIES OF VOLUNTEERS. 

Paid Mrs. Thomas Puffer, 

Lorenzo L. Hawkins, 
Alpheus Hathaway, 
Henry Hitchcock, 
Anthony Bolack, 
Edwin Graves, 
Lysander Chaffin, 
Charles P. Wait, 
John W. Field, 
Emerson L. Covill, 
Calvin N. Covill, 
J. E. King, 
John H. Vining, 
Oliver S. Vining, 
David B. Curtis, 
Lorenz Seitz, 

Amount carried forward, $1,437 35 

2 



$210 


40 


205 


34 


124 


39 


20 


42 


183 


20 


78 


00 


27 


99 


51 


69 


55 


98 


78 


00 


78 


00 


55 


98 


55 


98 


78 


00 


55 


98 


78 


00 



10 



Amount brought forward, 
Paid Mrs. Oliver Warner, 

Ebenezer C. Anderson, 
F. B. Bennet, 
Alonzo Dennis, 
Lewis Covill, 
John Beck's son, 
L. J. Bristol's son, 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 
1862 I. G. Dickinson, Agent, 

March 24 For balance due, 

stock on hand, 

cash paid for stock and freight, 

" license, 

salary, 

1863. Contra, Cr. 

March 20 By cash received for sales, 

stock on hand, 

cash received to balance account, 



$1,437 35 


78 


00 


55 


60 


24 


22 


164 


60 


27 


99 


24 


22 


24 


22 


$1,836 20 



$3 90 


33 


41 


, 57 


53 


20 


00 


31 


00 


8110 77 


3 


00 


32 


07 



8145 84 



$145 84 



RECAPITULATION. 



RECEIPTS. 
Amount of taxes assessed, 
Balance in hands of treasurer, March 12, 1862, 
Treasurer's note to Savings Bank, 
Collector of Taxes for 1861, 
School Fund, 

State Treasurer, reimbursement of State Aid for 1861, 
Town ofBarre, expense of pauper, 
Geo. W. Hubbard, guardian of Sarah Morton, 
A. M Peck, for old hearse, 
H. P. Billings, error in settlement with treasurer 1861, 



Outstanding orders, 



$7,968 


63 


61 


14 


2,000 


00 


158 


50 


49 


33 


154 


55 


334 


49 


153 


13 


6 


25 


7 


66 


810,893 


68 


75 


00 


$10,968 


68 



11 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Old Bills, $1,288 09 

Paupers, 636 69 

Roads and Bridges, 682 39 

Special Appropriation, 50 00 

Schools, 1,224 15 

Incidental Expenses, 237 14 

Notes and Interest, 863 52 

Abatement of Taxes, 92 33 

Liquor Agency 32 07 

State Tax, 2,142 00 

County Tax, 1,245 13 

State Aid, 1,836 20 



Cash in treasurer's hands to new account, 
Amount uncollected by E. N. Sampson, 



810,968 68 

WM. H. DICKINSON, \ Selectmen 
R. H. BELDEN, } of 

D. F. WELLS, Treasurer. J. T. FITCH, j Hatfield. 

March 20, 1863. 



275 78 
363 19 


$10,329 71 
638 97 





■rfMfcAAArtfrrti iftrfKli dirt <fh Art * + fifl AMrftAAAA 



VOLUNTEERS FROM HATFIELD. 

SECOND REGIMENT. 
Edward G. Hoyt. 

TENTH REGIMENT. 
Jonathan D. Warner, Judson H. Harris, 

James H. Abbott, Charles L. Bardwell, discharged, 

D wight Morton, discharged, 

FIFTEENTH REGIMENT, 

Peter Cartier, discharged. 

TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT, 

Michael Hennesy, Thomas Puffer, discharged, 

Elbridge G. Clifford, died from Lorenzo L. Hawkins, 
wounds received in battle, Davis, 

TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 

Joseph Billings, discharged, Edward C. Cowles. 

Henry Bardwell, 



12 



TWENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT. 

Richard Abbott, Cordeno Sweet, discharged, 

Lyman Abbott, Dwight Strong, discharged, 

Henry Hitchcock, Thomas Frary, Jr., 

Fred Klistner, Alden T. Moore, 

James C. Halloran, John Richards. 

THIRTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

Alonzo Dennis, died, Obadiah H. Smith, discharged, 

Anthony Bolack, Alpheus Hathaway. 

Wells Clark, 

THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 
Dwight D. Graves, Wm. R. Waite, 

THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT. 
Lysander Chaffin, John H. Vining, 

Edwin Graves, David B. Curtis, 

Charles P. Waite, died, Oliver S. Vining, 

John W. Field, Oliver Warner, 

Emerson L. Covill, Wm. H. Fuller, 

Calvin N. Covill, Lorenz Seitz, 

Elihu Covill, Fred. A. Farley, 

J. E. King, Henry Field, 

Charles E. Hubbard, Henry Doane, 

FIFTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 
H. P. Billings, Fernando B. Bennet, 

John E. Doane, John Beck, 

Jerry Brown, George Chandler, 

Charles K. Morton, Ebenezer C. Anderson, 

Lucius Field, Josiah L. Morton, 

Daniel W. Wells, Augustus D. Cowles, 

Alvin L. Strong, Caleb D. Bardwell, 

John E. Wait, Dwight G. Abells, 

Whitney Cooley, Myron D. Cooley, 

Henry A. Dickinson, Henry Anderson, 

Alvin D. Dinsmore, Geo. D. Marsh, 

Lambert J. Bristol, Seth Kingsley, 

Alonzo Hallett, 

REGULAR ARMY. 
George W. Bliss, discharged. 

FIRST REGT. MASS. CAVALRY. 
Wm. Baldwin. 

VERMONT REGIMENT. 
Philetus Averill, Ebenezer White, 

FIRST CONN. BATTERY. 

Lewis Sikes. 

Charles L. Babcock, regiment not known. 



Report of the School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD. 

186 2-63. 



The Board of School Committee was organized April 15, 1862, 
by the choice of Edwin Graves, Chairman ; and Oscar Beldeit, 
Secretary. In the fall Mr. Graves' absence from town caused a va- 
cancy in the board, and as the law directs, the boards of Select- 
men and School Committee met Nov. 25, 1862, and elected R. H. 
Belden to fill the vacancy. 

By statute law, " the School Committee shall annually make a 
detailed report of the condition of the several public schools, which 
report shall contain such statements, and suggestions in relation to 
the schools as the Committee deem necessary or proper to promote 
the interests thereof." 

The condition of the schools in town the past year, as compared 
with former years, has been favorable. They have generally been 
prosperous, some have given satisfaction in all respects, others have 
done tolerably well. 

There are many causes which prevent our schools from attaining 
that degree of excellence which is desired ; among which, perhaps, the 
most prominent is the lack of hearty co-operation on the part of the 
parents and guardians with the teachers. Teachers should be en- 
couraged and supported in a proper yet thorough discipline of the 
schools. Parents and guardians should visit the schools. They 
should make an effort to prevent absence and tardiness on the part 
of the scholars. The habits of punctuality and regularity are as in- 
dispensable to our success in life as the knowledge obtained from 
school books. 



Most of the winter schools have been interrupted by diseases 
which have been prevalent in town. On this account Pantry, West 
Brook, and the North Center schools, had no examinations. There- 
fore we cannot judge so well of their final success. 

By vote of the town, one hundred dollars of the school money 
raised, was put into the hands of the School Committee, to be used 
at their discretion for equalizing the length of the schools. This 
with forty-one dollars of state money, has been distributed as follows : 
West Brook received thirty one dollars and thirty-three cents. The 
rest was divided equally among the five winter schools in the street 
and farms ; all of which were short of money to carry them out the 
common length of a twelve weeks term. In making out this division 
we found the amount which each district would have to expend on one 
term of school (each scholar drawing four dollars and twenty-two 
cents and seven mills). Pantry would have $118 35 to spend on 
each one of its schools, Hill $100 03, Center $76 86, West Brook, 
$48 61, West Farms $45 08. 

It will be seen at once that Pantry and the Hill had an abundance 
of money for their schools, while the other districts were short. 

We recommend that the same amount of school money be raised 
this year as last. . The number of scholars in town this year is 
two hundred and seventy-two, last year two hundred and forty-three, 
the year before two hundred and thirty. The following is a report 
of the condition of the several public schools : — 

Hill District — Summer Term — This school was in charge of 
Miss Emeiine E. Rose, a teacher of experience and good qualifica- 
tions. Her school always appeared well and made good progress. 
Winter term, upper department. — This school was taught by Miss 
Martha Gardner. It always appeared well when visited by the Com- 
mittee. Lower department was in charge of Miss Lucy S. Cooley. 
The school in many of its features was commendable. The scholars 
seemed to be enthusiastic and had their lessons well learned. 

South Centek — Both terms of this school have been in charge 
of Miss Fanny Graves, a teacher of experience and good qualifica- 
tions. She has met with her usual good success. 

North Center. — Summer term— -This school opened with a new 
teacher, Miss Mary A. Cooley. It being her first term, she had not 
the experience needed to make her school a perfect success. Winter 
Term — Miss Sarah M. Smith had charge of this school. The good 
order maintained, the energy of the teacher, and ambition of the 
scholars can but meet the approval of all. 



Center — Winter term — This school, under the instruction of 
Mr. W. M. Howland, made good progress. The teacher labored 
earnestly and judiciously for its success. 

West Farms — Summer Term — Miss Sarah M. Smith taught this 
school. Her whole heart was in the work — she gained the affection 
of her scholars and inspired them with enthusiasm in their studies. 
Winter term, upper department. — This school, in charge of Mr.De- 
Witt S. Clark, was well managed and prosperous. Lower depart- 
ment. — This school, a few years ago one of the largest in town, but 
now the smallest except one, was in charge of Miss Sarah M. Hall. 
It was hardly up to the standard of excellence desired. 

West Brook. — The summer term was taught by Miss Annette A. 
Crafts. The school was small and the teacher did not seem to awak- 
en in the scholars that interest and enthusiasm which we like to see. 
Winter term — This school, in care of Miss Emeline E. Rose, has 
been thoroughly and practically drilled, and the district are under 
great obligations to the teacher for her earnest and faithful labors. 

Pantry. — Summer term — This school was under the instruction 
of two teachers, Miss Fidelia A. Bryant and Miss Nettie E. Billings. 
Miss Bryant taught but four weeks. She had the reputation of being 
a good teacher. But when she began this school she had not recover- 
ed from the weariness and exhaustion of previous teaching. Her 
success not being what the Committee had hoped, it seemed best 
that she should not continue the school. Miss Nettie E. Billings 
then took charge of it. She showed herself to be a teacher of supe- 
rior qualifications. Winter term — This school under the care of 
Miss Ellen M. Frary in some respects has done well. 



J. M. GREENE, ) School Committee 
R. H. BELDEN, V of 

OSCAR BELDEN, j Hatfield. 



Hatfield, March 14, 1863. 



£ 





55 H 


a 

3 
ID 

C 

S 

3 

OQ 

3 

a 

a 
-r. 

a 

a 

= 

3 

£ 
5 


c© 00 im «s eo « 

CO <N ~* 




n 


« 15 R F^ 




o 

I * 

£ 02 


« CO <?1 CO CO «« <M«5 

co co "* 00 O ■* 

W5 CO «<*< <M CSJ "«*i 




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Ph 





a 


«o«5h r-i -*-* 

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^ CO 10 "**< 08 




■— ■- 
J3 — ^ 
S ° O 

02 


-* -* co co •«* coco eo co 
^ co co eo co -* 




u 

c8 



■g 

02 


Emelinc E. Rose, 
Martha Gardner, 
Lucy S. Coolcy, 
Fanny Graves, 
W. M. llowland, 
Mary A. Cooley, 
Sarah M Smith, 
Sarah M. Smith, 
Sarah M. Hall, 
DcWitt S. Clark, 
Annette A. Crafts, 
Emelinc E. Rose, 
Ellen M. Frary, 
Fidelia A. Bryant, ) 
Nettie E. Billings, J 




S 




Hill, 

Hill, 

Hill, 

South Center, 

Center, 

North Center, 

North Center, 

West Farms, 

West Farms, 

West Farms, 

West Brook, 

West Brook, 

Pantry, 

Pantry, 

Pantry, 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen and School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OP HATFIELE 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 23,1864 



< ■^«~«»— » 



NORTHAMPTON : 
PRINTED BY TRUMBULL & GKEHE. 

1864. 



Keport of the Selectmen. 



The following shows the results of another financial year : — 

Although the war has continued, our peaceful vocations have been 
prosperous and undisturbed except by the frequent calls for more 
men for our country's service, which have caused some trembling of 
heart, and weakness of limbs ; but a supply of " Greenbacks " liber- 
ally furnished by our citizens, the kindness of substitute brokers, and 
the noble patriotism and unshaken faith in our Government and in 
the ultimate success of our arms, which have led some of our sold- 
iers to re-enlist, have brought relief so that we are now able to report 
all our assigned quotas filled, with a surplus of eleven men, to be 
credited on the call of the President, made the 14th instant. 

Although the disbursements of the town have been very much in- 
creased, there is still a balance in the treasury after paying the lia- 
bilities of the town. The system adopted by the town of raising a 
sufficient sum of money to pay the current expenses of the year, in- 
stead of creating a debt to be paid at some future time, is commenda- 
ble. All the notes of the town have been paid, with the exception 
of those given by the Treasurer, (amounting to three thousand dol- 
lars,) to pay the families of volunteers ; which sums will be reim- 
bursed by the state. 

Twenty-five families have received State Aid during the year, 
which has been paid to them monthly, amounting to twenty-three 
hundred and eighty nine dollars and forty cents. 

As most of the bridges of the town were in good repair, having 
been recently built, the expenses for rebuilding and for repairs have 
been less than previous years, — Cow Bridge being the only one we 
thought it necessary to rebuild. 



The expenditures for paupers have been increased, in consequence 
of Asa Wells, and the family of Almeron Smith becoming a charge 
to the town, and also by the advance in the price of board and 
clothing. 

Application was made to us on the 22d of Sept. last, by Mrs. Ann 
Smith, wife of Almeron Smith, for assistance for herself and family, 
which was granted. Mr. Smith having a legal settlement in the 
town of Whately, the Overseers of the Poor of that town were noti- 
fied, in accordance with law, to remove Mrs. Ann Smith and child, or 
otherwise provide for their support. In reply they denied their set- 
tlement, and refused to remove or provide for them. A town meet- 
ing was called to see what action the town would take in relation 
thereto, and it was voted unanimously to make the Selectmen a com- 
mittee to commence a suit against the town of Whately for their sup- 
port, and in accordance with that vote a writ has been served on 
that town, but a trial cannot be had earlier than the June term of 
the court. 

The Liquor Agent will make his report to the town at the annual 
meeting. 

There will be a bill for printing this report, and to the Selectmen 
for services, which will be presented to the town at the annual meet- 
ing. All the other bills against the town that have come to our 
knowledge have been paid. 



5 

EXPENDITURES. 



Old Bills. 

Paid H. S. Porter for wood for District No. 1, 13 87 

" A. M. Peck, overwork on highway, 10 26 

" C. D. Bartlett, " " " 4 92 

" Frederick Carl, labor on Hill Bridge, 1 50 

" Dr. Myron Harwood, med. attendance on paupers, 17 67 

" Rev. J. M. Green, services as school committee, 21 00 

" Edwin Graves, " " " 6 75 

" Oscar Belden, " " " 19 00 

" R. H. Belden, « " " 8 00 

" Trumbull & Gere, printing Selectmen's Report, 20 00 
" R. H. Belden, Cash paid by Selectmen for volunteers 

and exemptions, as by vote of town, 26 50 
" Wm. H. Dickinson, services as Selectman, and 

cash paid, 46 86 

11 R. H. Belden, services as Selectman, and cash paid, 24 00 

" John T. Fitch, " " " " 16 62 



[Paupers. 
Paid Insane Asylum for support of Sarah Morton, 
" " " " Francis Abbott, 

" " " Brattleboro, for support of Oliver 

Bardwell, 
" Dr. Alfred Montville, med. attendance on paupers, 
" Dr Myron Harwood " " " 

" Overseers of the poor of Boston for the support of 

Lydia Potter, 
" O. Marsh for keeping transient paupers, 
* D. F. Wells & Brother for goods furnished Ann Smith, 
" " " " clothing " paupers 

" S. G. Hubbard for wood furnished Ann Smith, 
" John T. '& George C. Fitch for wood furnished Hosea 

Wheeler, 
" Wm. H. Dickinson, clothing furnished Ann Smith, 

and Wm. Wells, 
" R. H. Belden expenses removing Asa Wells, and bill 

paid to town of Cheshire, 
" R. H. Belden, clothing for Theodore and Asa Wells, 
" H. Anderson for support of Ann Dickinson, 

" " Theodore Wells, 

" Asa Wells, 

" i( Sarah Green, 

" clothing for paupers, 

$940 21 



a 


tt 


t( 


ti 


it 


a 


a 


t« 



$236 95 


93 


97 


172 


57 


100 


00 


76 


50 


10 


50 


13 


00 


4 


50 


;h, 41 


50 


s, 14 


55 


11 


50 


i 

6 


63 


14 


15 


19 


37 


20 


35 


91 


00 


78 


00 


58 


71 


104 


00 


9 


41 



SCHOOLS. 

District No. 1. 
Paid Lydia Hitchcock for services as teacher, 
" Maria E. Ayers " " " 

" H. Augusta Cook, " " 

" Myra Warner, '• " 

" Charles S. Boynton, boarding teachers, 
" E. N. Sampson, " " 

" John T. & Geo. C. Fitch for wood, 



District No. 2. 
Paid Sarah M. Smith for services as teacher, 
" Sarah Clapp " " " 

" C. M. Billings, Jr. " « 

" L. S. Bliss for boarding teacher, 
" Dwight P. Morton for boarding teacher, 
" J. T. & G. C. Fitch for wood, 
" Joseph Richards for sawing wood, 



District No. 3. 

Paid Laura A. Field for services as teacher, 
" George C. Merrill " " 

" Franklin Field, for boarding teacher, 
" S. D. Bartlett 
" " " " for wood, 



District No. 4r. 
Paid Sarah Orcutt for services as teacher, 
" Emma E. Rose, 
" H. Anderson for boarding teacher, 14 00 

" " " " wood furnished, 7 71 

" Jerome W. King for boarding teacher, 26 00 



District No. 5. 
Paid Martha M. Lyman for teaching, 
" Mattie Gould, " " 

<4 Henry Dwight for boarding teacher, 
" Ziba Bolter for wood, 



45 


50 


74 


50 


54 


25 


47 


00 


111 


00 


15 


00 


16 


92 


8364 


17 


78 


00 


78 


00 


117 


50 


62 


00 


62 


00 


27 


00 


6 


50 


$431 


00 


61 


50 


37 


60 


28 


00 


24 


00 


21 


40 


8172 50 


16 


00 


58 


50 



8122 21 


109 


25 


9 


00 


77 


50 


19 


75 



$215 50 



State Aid. 



Paid Mrs. Lorenzo L. Hawkins, 
" Alpheus Hathaway, 
" Emerson L. Covill, 
" Calvin N. Covill, 
" Lewis Covill, 
" Oliver S. Vining, 
" John H. Vining, 
" David B. Curtis, 
" Lysander Chaffin, 
" J. E. King, 
" Edwin Graves, 
" John W. Field, 
" Lorenz Seitz, 
" Anthony Bolack, 
" Oliver Warner, 
Eddie Bristol, 
George Beck, 
Mrs. Ebenezer Anderson, 
" F. B. Bennett, 
" Henry Hitchcock, 
" Charles P. Wait, 
" Alonzo Dennis, 
Thomas Puffer, 
Thomas Dinsmore, 
Wm. J. Babcoek & Wife, 



Incidental Expenses. 

Paid Wm. B. Coleman for scraper furnished, 
" Wm. D. Billings for assessing taxes and cash paid, 
" *« " u for services as Town Clerk 

and cash paid, 
George Wait for services as Assessor and cash paid, 
Samuel P. Billings " " 

C. N. Coleman for labor on Cow Bridge, 
A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 
O. C. Shumway for overwork on highway, 
John T. & George C. Fitch for Timber and Plank, 
E. N. Sampson for services as Collector and Constable 
Charles D. Bartlett for overwork on highway, 
George W. Hubbard, going to Northampton twice, 
O. C. Shumway for Liquor furnished the town, 

D. F. Wells for services as Treasurer, 
Henry S. Porter for services as Elector, 



120 00 

104 54 

144 00 

144 00 

52 27 

144 00 

104 54 

104 54 

52 27 

104 54 

144 00 

104 54 

144 00 

144 00 

144 00 

23 86 

23 86 

144 00 

52 27 

43 72 

101 06 

140 00 

7 45 

45 98 

51 96 



$2389 40 


7 


00 


37 


71 


24 


03 


32 


50 


27 


00 


38 


50 


4 


40 


9 


78 


131 


98 


e, 61 


87 


33 


45 


3 


50 


43 


82 


25 


00 


12 


00 



$492 54 



8 



Notes and Interest. 

Paid Louisa Chenery War Committee's note, 1696 00 
" Edwin Morton, Town note, 1000 00 

" Sophia Smith, War Committee's note, 2811 17 
" D. F. Wells, cash paid for Interest, 164 25 



$5671 42 



EECAPITULATION. 



[Receipts. 

Amount of taxes assessed, 11,661 64 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, March 20, 1863, 275 78 

Collector of Taxes for 1862, 363 19 

School Fund, 55 76 

State Treasurer, reimbursement of State Aid for 1862, 1291 00 

Treasurer's note to Edwin Morton, 1000 00 

" " Nelson Clapp, 1000 00 

George W. Hubbard, guardian of Sarah Morton, 93 97 

Dog Tax, 4 00 

State Treasurer, reimbursement of bounties, 4100 00 









$19,845 34 


Disbursements. 






Old Bills, 






236 95 


Paupers, 
Schools, 






940 21 
1305 38 


Incidental Expenses, 
Notes and Interest, 






492 54 
5671 42 


Abatement of Taxes, 






93 14 


Outstanding order of last year, 
State Tax, 






75 00 
2856 00 


County Tax, 
State Aid, 






1131 94 
2389 40 


State Treasurer, tax for bounties, 






4068 18 


Cash in Treasurer's hands to new 


$19,260 16 


account, 


267 


70 




Amount uncollected by E. N. Sampson, 


317 


48 


585 18 



WM. H. DICKINSON, ) iSelec 
JOHN T. FITCH, } o 

REUBEN H. BELDEN, ) Hat} 



Selectmen 

>f 
Hatfield. 



D. F. WELLS, Treasurer. 



March 23, 1864. 



Report of the School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



Fop the Year I 8 63-- 6 4. 



In making a report of the condition of the schools of the 
town during the past year, your Committee are happy to be 
able to say that in no year of their acquaintance with the 
schools have the efforts of the scholars been crowned with so 
great success. There have been manifested an energy in the 
pupils and a thirst for knowledge, the absence of which has 
sometimes made the expenditures of the town almost useless. 
It is no small part of education to arouse the mind of the pu- 
pil. Once awakened, it will press on, almost alone, in the 
pursuit of the desired object. The mind asleep can do no 
more than the body asleep. Some of our scholars attend 
school only enough to be put upon the track of knowledge, 
and we have felt that they should be aroused to do for them- 
selves, what, under more favorable circumstances, the teacher 
would in part do for them. While the other branches 
of study have not been neglected, we have labored especially 
to improve the scholars in reading and spelling. To read 
well is a great accomplishment. It requires a perfect maste- 
ry of the organs of speech, a grasping of the thought, and a 
perception and realization of the various kinds of emotion or 
shades of feeling in the author. If one can do this in his read- 
ing lesson, he can in any other. And we have observed that 
the way in which a pupil reads is a pretty sure index of his gen- 
eral scholarship. So that we have felt that to make the schol- 



ars good readers, was the fastest and surest way to render them 
proficient in all their studies. We have had great satisfaction 
in noting the progress which the pupils in general have made 
the past year in this department. And we think that parents 
might do much in the education of their children. If they 
would accustom them to read often in the family some interes- 
ting and instructive passages, being sure that they get the 
sense of what they read and so express it as to convey it clear- 
ly to the minds of others. Be sure, too, that they read with 
energy. Not too fast nor too loud, but as if they were awake 
and their whole soul was in it. 

We feel it to be our duty to say to the town that we fear 
that we are not doing justice to the children in the facilities 
w T hich we afford them for education. We are not doing so 
much as the towns about us for the education of the young. 
We owe it to our children to fit them well to discharge the 
duties of citizens which will so soon come upon them. It would 
not require a great sum of money to keep a school for our lar- 
ger scholars in operation six months in the year. No new 
school-house would be needed. The one which we have is 
not beyond the reach of all the larger scholars in town. The 
effort of such a school upon the next generation would be good 
beyond estimation. Such a school would enable our children 
to get an earlier start in their studies and be better qualified 
to go abroad to attend a higher school or seminary. And 
what is of the greatest importance, they would be under the 
parents' care during just those years when so many of the young 
away from home are tempted, led astray, and ruined. 

We would say a word about the number of scholars in the 
schools. The labor of the teacher is sometimes nearly thrown 
away by having more pupils under her charge than she can 
pervade with her presence and spirit. Small children, espec- 
ially, learn only as they come into personal contact with the 
teacher. The teacher is the lodestone, the pupils the steel. 
The teacher needs to know the ten^erament, the disposition, 
the habits of each pupil, in order to do them much good. The 
mechanic cannot file his saw by some general work on it, but 
he must take hold of each tooth repeatedly and shape and 
sharpen it. So it is not general instruction that developes and 
shapes the mind of the pupil, not individual instruction, that 
which is suited to the exact case of each pupil. But in order 
to do this the teacher needs a small number of pupils. In our 
best schools in the state, twenty is the number of scholars as- 



signed to one teacher. Some of our schools have suffered the 
past year because they were too large. It is our opinion that 
the Pantry District should have two schools, at least in the 
Winter. 

The one hundred dollars raised by the town and put into 
the hands of the Committee for equalizing the length of the 
schools, were appropriated in equal sums to five schools, one 
at "West Brook, two at West Farms, and two in the center. 

Hill District. The number of scholars in this district is 
so large that it has been necessary to have two schools, both 
Summer and Winter. The larger scholars during the Summer 
were under the instruction of Miss E. M. Ayers, and during 
the Winter, of Miss H. A. Cook. They were both good teach- 
ers. In addition to the Summer term of sixteen weeks, Miss 
Ayers taught an Autumn school in this district of seven weeks. 
The smaller scholars were under the instruction during the 
Summer of Miss Lydia Hitchcock, and during the Winter of 
Miss Myra Warner. We are unable to speak of the progress of 
this school in the Summer, as no one of the Committee visited it 
at or near the examination. But we are happy to say that in 
the Winter, though we had our fears at the beginning, yet, 
after the first few weeks it appeared remarkably well. We 
think no school in the town made greater progress' during 
the term, than this. 

South Center. This school has been during both terms 
under the instruction of Miss Sarah E. Clapp. There has not 
been that thoroughness in the instruction, nor that awaken- 
ing of interest in the scholars, which are necessary to a teach- 
er's success. 

North Center. Miss Sarah M. Smith has taught this 
school during both terms, with her usual good success. The 
scholars loved their school aud made much proficiency under 
the thorough, energetic, and kind hand of their teacher. 

Center. Charles M. Billings, A. B.,one of our own young 
men, has taught this school during its one term, the Winter. 
We have been happy to observe with what willingness of pur- 
pose and patient and persevering effort the teacher has sought 
the good of his pupils, and what interest the pupils on their 
part have manifested in their school. The only regret which we 
had at the close was, that, after a short vacation, the scholars 



could not commence at the point to which the teacher had 
brought them and proceed another term. 

"West Farms. Miss Laura A. Field taught this school en- 
tire in the Summer, and the division of the smaller scholars in 
the Winter, with eminent success. 

A few of the larger scholars were, during the "Winter term, 
under the instruction of Mr. George C. Merrill, of Amherst 
College. He lacked experience as a teacher, and some other 
qualifications which perhaps age may give him. 

"West Brook. The Summer school in this district was 
opened by Miss Sarah A. Orcutt. It continued but eight 
weeks, and that with some interruption, and was discontinued 
on account of sickness in the family of the teacher. ¥e are 
unable to express any opinion as to the success of the school 
this term, as it was visited only once by the Committee, and 
it closed without an examination. 

During the Winter, Miss Emeline E. Rose taught this school 
with great thoroughness and marked success. ¥e were much 
pleased with the examination by topics. The government 
of the school was unconstrained, yet perfect. The whole 
mind and heart of each scholar seemed to be engrossed with 
their studies. Miss Rose during the three terms that she has 
taught here, has done a great work for this district. 

Pantry. This school has been too large for any one teach- 
er to govern and instruct. Miss Mattie M. Lyman has taught 
it both summer and winter. She did more than we should sup- 
pose it possible with so many. She has rare qualifications as a 
teacher. During the last three weeks of the Winter term she 
was assisted by Miss Mattie Could. We have recommended 
in another place in this report that this school be divided, at 
least in the Winter. 

JOHN M. GREEN, ) 

REUBEN H. BELDEK [ Committee. 

OSCAR BELDEN, 



EEPO RTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen and School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD. 



For the Year 1864-65. 



< —■ ■ m > 



NORTHAMPTON : 

TRUMBULL & GERE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



Report of the Selectmen. 



In accordance with the duties devolving upon us, we submit our 
Report to the Town for the past year. 

The expenses of the town have been very large, in consequence of the 
continuance of the war, and the financial state of the country ; but 
we are happy to be able to report a balance in favor of the Treasury, 
of seventeen hundred and forty-three dollars and ninety-nine cents, 
from the appropriations made at the annual meeting. In addition to 
this there is six hundred and thirty-five dollars and sixty-four cents 
in the Treasurer's hands to pay State Aid. There are outstanding 
notes of the town, given by the Treasurer to pay State Aid to fami- 
lies of volunteers, to the amount of three thousand dollars, which 
will be reimbursed by the State. 

At a town meeting called for the purpose, the Treasurer was au- 
thorized to borrow money to pay bounties to volunteers, and in ac- 
cordance with that vote, he borrowed twenty-eight hundred and sev- 
enty-five dollars. Five hundred of said sum is still deposited with 
the State Treasurer to pay for recruits obtained by the State. By a 
recent vote of Congress, the states are not credited for men procured 
in the rebel states, consequently the money will not be used, and it 
can be drawn from the State Treasury and applied on the town notes, 
thus reducing the debts of the town, to twenty- three hundred and 
seventy-five dollars. This money with what has been contributed by 
individuals has enabled us to fill the quotas of the town. 

During the year, twenty-five families have received monthly pay- 
ments of State Aid, amounting to twenty hundred and ten dollars 
and ninety-seven cents. 



The expenditures for paupers have been about the same as for the 
previous year. The town has paid the bills to the Insane Asylum, 
for the support of Mrs. Orcutt, but there will probably be received 
from her estate, a sum sufficient to pay the expenses for the present 
year. 

The suit which was commenced against the town of Whately pre- 
vious to our last report, for the support of the family of Almeron 
Smith has been settled. The town of Whately paying the expenses 
incurred, and providing for them. 

On the eighth day of February application was made to the town 
for aid for John Mahar, and the expense for his support is now be- 
ing paid by the town. He is without settlement in the state, but 
the town will have to provide for him until he is able to be moved to 
the State Alms House. 

There will be bills due on the first of April for board of Philena 
A. Orcutt and Francis Abbott for the last six months ; also for print- 
ing this report, and to the Selectmen for services. 

The report of the Liquor Agent will be presented to the town at 
the annual meeting. 



EXPENDITURES. 

OLD BILLS. 

Paid Oscar Belden, for services as School Committee, $22 00 

Rev. John M. Greene, " " " 25 75 

John Hastings, obtaining deposition of Samuel 

Partridge, 
Charles D. Bartlett, overwork on highways, 
Trumbull & Gere, printing Selectmen's and 

School Committee's reports, 
John T. Fitch, for services as Selectman, 
K. H. Belden, 

Wm. H. Dickinson " " 

Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for town, 
It. H. Belden, for services as School Committee, 

$268 44 



5 


00 


3 


76 


20 


00 


26 


00 


33 


00 


89 


50 


19 


43 


24 


00 



PAUPERS. 

Paid Insane Asylum for support of Philena E. Orcutt. 
« " ' k Francis F. Abbott 

" " Brattleboro for support of Oliver 

Bardwell, 
O. Marsh for keeping transient paupers, 
H. Anderson for support of Ann Dickinson, 
" " Sarah Green, 

" " Theodore Wells, 

" " Asa Wells, 

Rolla Wells, 
Dr. Alfred Montville, Med. att'ce for Johanna Branikin, 
" " " Hosea Wheeler, 

Seelah Wheeler 
Wm. Allen, Jr., council in the case of Mrs. Ann Smith 
Patrick Russell, rent of house for " " 

David F. Wells & Brother for goods furnished Ann 

Smith, 
David F. Wells & Brother for goods furnished Wm. 

Wells, 
J. T. & G. C. Fitch for wood furnished John Mahar, 
R. H. Belden, for cash paid for paupers, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for paupers, 
Thomas Cutter, keeping pauper, 



$143 


96 


82 


93 


120 


00 


18 


00 


104 


00 


138 


86 


104 


00 


104 


00 


25 


00 


in, 6 


00 


14 


00 


42 


75 


a, 10 


00 


24 


00 


58 


00 


8 


38 


12 


00 


41 


49 


53 


30 


1 


50 


$1,112 


17 



SCHOOLS. 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 



Paid Lottie Graves, for services as teacher, $63 00 

Myra Warner, 8 « " 96 75 

Wm. Coleman, for boarding teacher, 90 00 

Lewis S. Dyer, for wood furnished, . . 32 00 

J. S. Graves, for boarding teachers, 80 50 

John T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for wood, 6 50 

$368 75 



DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Paid Laura A. Field, for services as teacher, 
Alice J. Hurd, " " 

C. M. Billings, jr., " 
Wm. Daugherty, for boarding teacher, 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for wood, 
Elijah Bard well, for boarding teacher, 
J. D. Brown, for wood, 
Philas Doane, for preparing wood, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, for wood furnished, 
Otis C. Wells, 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 



DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Paid Catherine T. Edson, for services as teacher, 
Martha A. Edson, 

Luman S. Crafts, for boarding teacher, 
Fannie S. Dickinson, for services as teacher, 



880 


00 


75 


00 


158 


25 


81 


50 


21 


75 


68 


00 


25 


75 


6 


50 


7 


00 


1 


19 



$524 94 



Paid Sarah M. Smith for services as teacher, $39 00 

Sarah M. Cook, " " 39 00 

Elihu Marsh, for wood, 45 48 

Foster C. Anderson, for boarding teacher, 32 50 

S. D. Bartlett " " 36 00 



$191 98 



$28 


00 


32 


00 


87 


00 


20 


00 



$167 00 



DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Paid Lucy A. Smith, for services, $112 00 

Maria T. Smith, " as teacher, 35 05 

I. G. Dickinson, for boarding teachers, 144 05 

" " preparing wood, 3 75 

$294 80 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Paid Horace Wait, for timber and labor, 

Dr. Myron Harwood, services as exam'ng surgeon, 

James O. Wait, for earth, 

A. M. Peck, expense repairing Hearse House, 

Geo. Wait, for services as assessor, 

Sam'l P. Billings, " 

Wm. D. Billings, for services as assessor and 

town clerk, 
Joseph S. Wells, for posting warrants, 
Silas G. Hubbard, administering oaths to aliens 

and others on the enrollment, 
Oscar Belden, services as collector, 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for plank and timber, 
D. F. Wells for stamps and paper, 

" " services as Treasurer, 

State Reform School for board of Edwin Jennie, 
A. M. Peck, for recording deaths, 
Henry Dwight, overwork on highways, 
Trumbull & Gere, for printing treasury orders, 
John E. Doane, services as constable, 



4 00 

30 00 

7 00 



34 


02 


47 


00 


43 


75 


95 


86 


3 


00 


5 


00 


88 


50 


65 


31 


1 


10 


25 


00 


9 


14 


4 


20 


88 


86 


3 


00 


3 


50 



$558 24 



STATE AID. 



Paid Mrs. Edwin Graves, 
Calvin N. Covill, 
Emerson L. Covill, 
Oliver Warner, 
Lorenz Seitz, 
Anthony Bolack, 
Ebenezer Anderson, 
Joseph Richards, 
Cordean Sweet, 
Alpheus Hathaway, 
David B. Curtis, 
John H. Vining, 
J. E. King, 
John W. Field, 
Lysander Chaffin, 
Lewis Covill, 
F. B. Bennet, 
Henry M. Hitchcock, 



Amount carried forward, 



$144 00 
144 00 
144 00 
144 00 
144 00 

60 00 

48 00 
148 30 
109 82 
106 30 
105 30 
105 30 
105 30 
105 30 

52 65 
8 75 
8 75 

50 70 

1,734 47 



8 

Amount brought forward, 1,734 47 

Paid Mrs.Alonzo Dennis, 4 00 

Charles P. Wait, 3 00 

Mary Shea, 55 60 

Oliver S. Vining, 12 00 

Joseph Brothers, 46 70 

Daniel Finn, 111. 20 

Wm. J. Babcock, 44 00 



$2,010 97 



BOUNTIES TO RE-ENLISTED VOLUNTEERS. 

Paid Francis E. Hartwell. 



Dwight D. Graves, 
Charles S. Babcock, 
Jonathan D. Warner, 
Edward Cowles, 
Henry Bardwell, 
John Richards, 
Henry M. Hitchcock, 
Joseph Billings, 
Charles W. Evans, 
George Warner, 



$50 00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


75 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


50 


00 


125 


00 



175 00 



PAYMENTS TO FAMILIES OF VOLUNTEERS AS PER 
VOTE OF THE TOWN. 

Paid Mrs Charles P. Wait, 
Edwin Graves, 
John W. Field, 
John H. Vining, 



Reimbursement to one hundred and twenty-five 
money paid for volunteers, 



$30 00 


53 


00 


23 


00 


20 


00 


$126 00 


individuals. 


, of 


$2,260 


70 



RECRUITING. 



Paid for volunteers , 

Deposited with State Treasurer for volunteers, 



$2,375 00 
500 00 



NOTES AND INTEREST. 



Paid Alpheus Cowles, 
Savings Bank, 
Interest on notes, 



Paid State tax, 
county " 



ftaid Assessors orders of abatement, 



$1125 00 

1000 00 

165 38 

$2290 38 

$2856 00 
1131 93 

$3987 93 
$81 33 



RECAPITULATION 



RECEIPTS. 

Amount of taxes assessed, 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, March 

23, 1864, 
E, N, Simpson col'tor of taxes for 1863, 
School Fund, 
State Treasurer, 

re'bursra't of State Aid, 
" " for recruiting, 

Town of Whately for support of paupers 
Michael Larkin, 
Treasurer's note to Savings Bank, 



A. Cowles, 

Elisha Wells, 

Mary & Dorothy Morton, 

D. F. Wells & Brother, 



$11,189 36 

267 70 

317 48 

54 97 

1171 47 

2363 18 

175 00 

130 50 

4 60 

1000 00 

625 00 

1125 00 

1625 00 

500 00 

125 00 



$20,674 26 



10 

DISBURSEMENTS. 



Old bills, 




268 


44 


Paupers, 




1112 


17 


Schools, » 




1547 


47 


Incidental expenses, 




558 


24 


State Aid, 




2010 


97 


Bounties to volunteers, 




2375 


00 


" re-enlisted volunteers, 




1175 


00 


Families of volunteers, 




126 


00 


Deposited with State Treasurer, 




500 


00 


Notes and interest, 




2290 


38 


State Tax, 




2856 


00 


County Tax, 




1131 


93 


Orders of abatement, 




81 


33 


Reimbursements, 




2260 


70 








Cash in Treasurer's hands to 








new account, 2080 


63 






Amount uncollected by Oscar 








Belden, 300 


00 










$2380 63 


$2380 63 







$20,674 $6 



WM. H. DICKINSON, ) Selectmen 
KEUBEN H. BELDEN, [ of 
JOHN T. FITCH, Hatfield. 



D. F. WELLS, Treasurer. 
March 20, 1865. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TO WIN" OF HATFIELD, 
For the Tear 1864-65, 



The number of teachers employed in our • schools during- 
the year has been 12 ; number of children in the town be- 
tween the ages of 5 and 15 years, 269 ; the whole number of 
scholars in our schools, 286 ; the number of scholars that have 
not drawn money in town by reason of their being under 5 
years of age, or over 15 years, 42 ; the number of children in 
town between the ages of 5 and 15, that have not been sch ©1- 
ars in our schools, 25. 

The amount of money raised by the town for the schools, 
$1,500. The town received from the State School Fund, $54. 
97. Two Hundred Dollars were, by vote of the town, put 
into the hands of the Committee to be divided among the 
schools, as they should deem it most just. Our aim in the di- 
vision was to equalize the length of the schools, as nearly as 
possible. 

To the Hill District we disbursed $11.13, which gave them 
27 weeks of schooling for the Upper Department and 26 weeks 
for the Lower Department. To the South Center District, 
$45.16 ; which gave them 27 weeks of schooling. To the North 
Center, $45.16 ; which gave them 25 weeks of schooling. To 
the Center Upper Department, $38.34 ; which gave them 14 
weeks of schooling. To West Farms District, $47.00 ; which 
gave them 25 weeks of schooling. To West Brook District, 
$60.68 ; which gave them 24 weeks of schooling. To Pantry 
District we disbursed none, they being able with the money 
which they drew upon their scholars, to continue their school 
32 weeks. 



We would suggest the propriety of the town making some 
arrangement for a nearer equalization of the length of the 
schools. We can see no justice in giving the children of one 
District 8 weeks of schooling in a year more than we give 
those of another. The money raised by the town is a com- 
mon fund, and every scholar in town is entitled to his part of it. 
We would recommend that the Hill District and the Cen- 
ter unite, on some equitable plan, and support a High School 
at least six months in a year. We are profoundly impressed 
with the idea that the next generation will blame us, unless 
we furnish them with the best facilities for education. The 
consideration is not, what advantages we enjoyed in childhood, 
but what the present times and exigencies demand, as a prep- 
aration to perform well the duties assigned our children as citi- 
zens of this Republic. Never were such broad fields opening for 
intellectual, moral, and philanthropic effort. Who shall settle 
the difficult political questions that will arise in our nation ? 
Who shall be teachers and preachers, lawyers and physicians, 
men and women of influence in all the professions and occupa- 
tions, to go out into every part of our country, carrying New 
England principles and education ? When the clash of arms and 
the booming of cannon on the bloody field have ceased, another 
battle will begin, of intellectual and moral forces, which must 
be fought to a favorable issue by the sons and daughters of 
New England descent. And it is this battle, that will decide, 
more than anything else, the future glory of our nation. Let 
us do all in our power to fit our children to be foremost in the 
ranks of that army. Education will make the wild wastes of 
the South rejoice and blossom as the rose, and dishorn the 
stupid hulls of the triple crown. We wish that parents would 
consider well the demands which the future will make upon 
their children, and use every means to render more complete 
their education, both as a bulwark of safety to them and the 
nation, and the most powerful weapon against sin and igno- 
rance. Education is one of the chief corner stones of our Re- 
public, and one of the surest guarantees of personal happiness 
and influence. 

We would recommend, for' the Schools during the coming 
year, an appropriation, at least, as large as that of last year. 

It is our opinion that greater care should be taken, in the 
selection of teachers, to get them who have had special train- 
ing for the work, and can apply the improved methods of in- 
struction. Teaching is a profession, involving a science and 
an art. Simply one's idea of education, whether it is the ac- 
quisition of knowledge, or the development, the discipline and 
culture, of all one's faculties, has an immense influence upon 



his success as a teacher. His knowledge of the human mind 
also, so that he will know in what order the faculties ought 
to be developed, and what subjects are best suited to unfold 
and strengthen each faculty, will almost decide the question 
whether one is qualified to teach. There is a right way to do 
everything. This is very evident in all the minor operations 
of life. You require of a man that he shall have had special 
instruction in his art, if he desires to work upon your nice 
watch. How much more if he is to work upon the mind of 
your child, infinitely more complicated and delicate than the 
nicest piece of human mechanism. Yet persons offer them- 
selves to work on the minds of our children, who have never 
attended a formal School, or a Teachers' Institute, nor devot- 
ed any especial study to the science of teaching. Ask them 
which of the faculties of a child's mind ought to be develop- 
ed earliest ? or what powers are called into exercise more im- 
mediately, in the study of the various branches which they 
propose to teach ? and they will look at you with blank aston- 
ishment. Because they do not know that reading is largely 
an imitative art, they waste term after term of the scholars' 
precious time, and worse than waste it, in their witless experi- 
ments. Not knowing that the learning of the multiplication 
and addition, the subtraction and division tables is simply a 
process of memory, they worry their pupils well nigh to death 
and wholly discourage them, in trying to make them reason 
or count them out. And they never succeed in getting them 
into the child's mind. Their processes of instruction are nearly 
as absurd as if they should attempt to teach the children to see 
with their ears. How much of this perverted work on the 
part of unskilled teachers we see every year, not in this town 
alone, but everywhere ! There is a better day coming for our 
children, when parents will demand that those who work on 
the minds of children shall understand the mind, and how 
to work it. Then those who offer themselves to teach must 
have had some special training for their vocation. Only 
geniuses can teach well without earnest and labored qualifica- 
tion. But geniuses are very rare. We would urge it upon 
the Prudential Committees, that they make it an important 
consideration, in the hiring of a teacher, whether he has giv- 
en any attention to a preparation for his work. 

We would also call the attention of parents to the impor- 
tance of their hearty co-operation with the teacher in his 
work. The position of teacher is a most difficult one. Pa- 
rents do really, to an extent, delegate to the teacher, their au- 
thority during the hours of school. And the greatest care 
should be taken not to embarrass the teacher in the exercise 



of his proper authority. An adverse word may do incalcula- 
ble injury in the government of a school. All your influence 
should be thrown upon the side of the teacher, to strengthen 
his hold upon the pupil's esteem and affection, and encourage 
his often despairing heart. 

We are often asked whether schools should keep live days, 
or five and a half each week. We reply that, by our School 
Registers, and the Reports of the Board of Education, a school 
month consists of twenty days, or four weeks of Hve days each. 
Also the Agent of the Board of Education says, in his last 
Report : " The general practice throughout this State, and the 
almost uniform custom in other States, so far as I have learn- 
ed, is, 1 to continue the schools five whole days, with no session 
on Saturday." In the School Committee's Report, for the 
town of Iladley, for the year 1861-2, we read: "Five days, 
of six hours each, now constitute our school week." Seve- 
ral reasons might be given in favor of this plan. We think 
it better for the small scholars, to have one whole day for 
recreation than the two fractions of a day, that they now 
have. It is also better for them who are old enough to con- 
vert time into money. We would therefore recommend to 
all of our Districts to adopt this regulation. 

It may not be improper for us to introduce here the law, 
which specifies the duties of the Prudential Committees of 
the town. This we do because we are sometimes asked what 
the statute is, and because we are sometimes prevented from 
doing our duty, through their undesigned neglect. The stat- 
ute is : — " Every town divided into districts shall, at its annu- 
al meeting, choose one person, a resident in each school dis- 
trict, to be a committee for that district, and to be called the 
prudential committee, who shall keep the school house in good 
order at the expense of the district ; and if there be no school 
house, shall provide a suitable place tor the school of the dis- 
trict at the expense thereof; shall provide fuel and all things 
necessary for the comfort of the scholars therein ; give infor- 
mation and assistance to the school committee of the town 
to aid them in the discharge of the duties required of them ; 
and, when the town so determines, shall select and contract 
with an instructor for each school in the district." 

In explanation of the statute the Secretary of the Board 
of Education says, " In case a teacher has been selected and 
approved by the superintending committee, in conformity to 
law, there is no authority in the prudential committee or the 
district, to close the house against such teacher." 

We would call attention to the clause in the statute, which 
makes it the duty of Prudential Committees to " give infor- 



rnation and assistance to the school committee of the town, 
and aid them in the discharge of the duty required of them." 
The "information," which we sometimes lack, pertains to the 
time of the examinations of the schools. The duty of inform- 
ing the school committee of such times, plainly devolves up- 
on the Prudential Committee. 

Hill District. — There were two schools in this District, 
both Summer and Winter. We were much pleased with the 
promptness of the scholars in the upper department. The 
gentle and winning manner of the teacher in the lower de- 
partment, qualified her well for her office among the small 
scholars. Both schools merit much commendation. 

South Center District. — One teacher taught this school 
both terms. The examination, at the close of the year, gave 
evidence of patient and successful labor on the part of both 
pupils and teacher. 

North Center District.— This school did better in the 
Summer than in the Winter. 

Center Upper Department. — This school continued but 
one term, and that in the Winter. The same teacher was em- 
ployed as the year before. 

West Farms District. — The Summer school was taught 
by a teacher who had had the school before. This term she 
met with her usual good success. In the Winter a teacher of 
much experience and high reputation was employed, but for 
some reason she failed to get the sympathy and love of the 
scholars, and her success was not complete. 

West Brook District. — This school continued in the Sum- 
mer but ten weeks, and closed without an examination. The 
Winter school has not yet closed. It is under the instruction 
rf its second teacher, the first one being obliged to discontin- 
ue on account of ill health. 

Pantry District. — One teacher kept this school in the 
Summer. In the Winter the same teacher, with her sister as 
assistant, was employed. Their success was much beyond our 
expectation. The teachers labored with diligence, and the 
school made marked progress during the year. We would 
recommend the same arrangement of the schools for the com- 
ing year. 

JOHN M. GREENE, ) </,.-., 
REUBEN H. BELDEN, [ n .?} 
OSCAR BELDEN, ) C ° mmi ttee. 

Hatfield, March 21, 1865. 



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REPORTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen and School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year 1865-6. 



NORTHAMPTON: 
3PRINTEJD BY TRUMBULL & GERE. 

1866. 



V 



Report of the Selectmen. 



Since our last report, the war has been brought to a close, and our 
Soldiers have returned to their homes to engage in the peaceful pur- 
suits of life. 

The town has furnished during the war, for the Military service of 
the Government, one hundred and forty-one men ; of this number one 
hundred and sixteen were for three years, and twenty-five for nine 
months. Of those who enlisted as inhabitants of the town, twenty- 
one have fallen in the service, and we trust s that the town will at 
some suitable time take such action as will perpetuate their memory. 

The town has paid fifteen thousand three hundred and seventy 
seven dollars as expenses incurred by reason of the war, which does 
not include the amount assessed to pay drafted men. In consequence 
of the discharge of our soldiers, their families were no longer entitled 
to State Aid, with the exception of the families of those who died or 
were disabled in the service, who were paid for one year from the death 
or disability of those upon whom they were dependent. The amount 
paid during the year as State Aid has been eight hundred and fifty 
two dollars and ten cents, which will be reimbursed by the State. 
Town Aid has been paid to four families in accordance with a vote of 
the town. 

The expenses for paupers were less than the appropriation, partly 
in consequence of the death of Sarah Green, which occured on the 
second of May last. We adopted the same course as in previous 
years for the support of the poor, and contracted with H. Anderson 
t o board Sarah Green, Ann Dickinson, Asa Wells and Theodore 
Wells at a stipulated price per week. Oliver Bardwell and Francis 



Abbott have been supported at Insane Asylum. The amount ex- 
pended for Mrs. Philena E. Orcutt has been refunded by G. W. 
Hubbard, guardian. Patrick Dulligan, an alien, applied for help 
from the town on the third of November last, but as he was not able 
to be removed to the State Alms House we have been obliged to pro- 
vide for him until his death, which occured on the twentieth of the 
present month. Joseph Sinsover, another alien, being sick and in 
destitute circumstances, we provided for him and family until his re- 
covery. 

The Town at the Annual Meeting made an appropriation of one 
thousand dollars to be expended on the Swamp Road. A contract 
was made with Bradford Smith, to build the bridges and grade the 
road for six hundred dollars. After Mr. Smith had finished his con-* 
tract we expended three hundred and fifty dollars for stone work and 
railing, and it being late in the Fall, and the money appropriated by 
the town nearly expended, we thought best to postpone any further 
work until the next Summer and see what effect the Spring freshets 
might have upon the road and then the town would be better able to 
judge of what might be necessary to be done. We are of the opinion 
that two or three hundred dollars should be expended on the east 
side of the river in widening the road and laying walls ; also a small 
sum of money will need to be expended to protect the banks of the 
new road at West Brook. 

There is a balance in the hands of the Treasurer of ten hundred 
eighty four dollars and seventy five cents, which will be reduced by 
a bill that becomes due on the first of April for the support of Francis 
E. Abbott for the last six months ; also a small bill for the funeral ex- 
penses of Patrick Dulligan. 



EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BILLS. 

Paid Insane Asylum for support of Francis Abbott, 
" R. H. Belden, for lumber furnished, 
" Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for John Mahar, 
" John.T. Fitch, for services as Selectman and cash paid, 
" R. H. Belden, " » " " " 

" Wm. H. Dickinson, " " " " 

" Rev. J. M. Greene , for services as School Committee, 
« Oscar Belden, « " " " 

" Oscar Belden for serving Town warrants, 
" Rev. J. M. Greene for apparatus and charts, 
" Dr. A. Montville for Medical Attendance on 

Selah Wheeler and John Mahar, 
" Dr. A. W. Thompson for Medical Attendance on 

John Mahar, 
" Luther Wells, Jr. for over work on Highway, 
" Trumbull & Gere for printing reports, 
" Henry Dwight over work on Highways, 
" R. H. Belden for services as School Committee,- 



PAUPERS. 

Paid Herrick Anderson for support of Sarah Green, 
" " " " " Asa Wells, 

" " " « « Theodore Wells, 

" • " " " " Ann Dickinson, 

tC Hospital for the Insane for support of 

Francis F. Abbott, 
" Hospital for the Insane for support of 

• Philena E. Orcutt, 

" Hospital for the Insane, Brattleboro, for support of 

O. Bardwell, 
" A. M. Peck for services as sexton for Sarah Green, 
" Dr. Myron Harwood for Medical Attendance on paupers, 8 00 
" Dr. A. Montville for Medical Attendance on 

Selah Wheeler, Hosea Wheeler and Cynthia Remington, 24 00 
" D. F. Wells & Bro. for goods furnished paupers, 3 00 

" R. H. Belden for cash paid and care of Patrick Dulligan, 91 03 
" " " " " " " Paupers, 49 00 

*' Dr. A. Montville for medicine furnished Pat. Dulligan, 2 00 
" <c " " medical attendance on J. Sinsover, 28 00 

if O. Marsh for keeping transient paupers, 15 50 

** John T. Fitch cash paid for Joseph Sinsover, 36 00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, clothing for Wm. Wells, 18 17 



^87 50 


9 


64 


11 


15 


59 


30 


70 


29 


150 


11 


26 


00 


23 


00 


12 


00 


10 


75 


70 


75 


10 


00 


13 


51 


32 


00 


9 


80 


21 


00 


$616 


80 


30 


00 


130 


00 


130 


00 


130 


00 


89 


98 


169 


46 


130 


00 


3 


00 



(l 



81087 14 



c 
SCHOOLS 



District No. 1. 

Paid L. Adelia Weeks, for services as Teacher, 
" Lottie Graves, " " " 

*' Wm. Coleman, for wood furnished, 
" " " " boarding Teachers, 



District No. 2. 

Paid Sarah M. Smith, for services as Teacher, 
" Laura Field, " " " 

" Maria Wilder, " " 
" Elijah Bardwell, for boarding Teacher, 
" L. S. Bliss, " " " 

{ « J. M. Greene, " " 

' t< A. M. Peck, " " " 

" Levi Moore, for wood furnished, 
" James 0. Waite, for cash paid for sawing wood., 
" Mary C. Billings, for board and Teaching, 



District No. 3. 
Paid Hattie Stearns, for services as Teacher, 
" John W. Morton, for boarding Teacher, 
" S. D. Bartlett, ' " 
" John W. Morton, for wood furnished, 



District No. 4=. 

Paid Maria Harrington, for services as Teacher, 

' " Clara L. Stearns, " 
« Mary J. Strong, " 
ff Horace Waite, for boarding Teacher, 
" " " " wood furnished, 



District No. 5. 
Paid Lucy A. Smith, for services as Teacher, 
'? Fanny S. Dickinson, " " 

« Hattie Hibbard, 

" A. M. Richmond, for boarding Teachers, 
" " " " wood furnished, 



1100 


80 


76 


60 


19 


00 


181 


60 


$378 


00 


124 


20 


36 


00 


38 


40 


36 


00 


42 


00 


48 


00 


44 


50 


39 


00 


11 


00 


86 


00 


8505 


10 


97 


50 


42 


00 


52 


00 


25 


97 


$217 47 


42 


.00 


3 


25 


42 


00 


74 


00 


12 


05 


$173 


30 


$56 00 


35 


75 


48 


75 


136 


50 


15 


25 



$292 25 



HIG-HWAYS AND BEIDG-ES. 

Bradford Smith, for building Swamp Road, $600 0$ 

" " laying walls at Swamp Road, 175 00 

Charles Miller, work on Highways, 3 75 

Wm. H. Dickinson, cash paid for labor on bridges, 48 20 

Michael Larkin, over work on Highways, 61 68 

" " cash paid for labor on Highway, 54 91 

George Chandler, for use of land for road, 7 00 

Thomas & A. Cutter, for earth, 20 00 

Nathaniel Ab ell, for drawing stone, 129 50 

Jacob Carl, ". " " 15 00 

John E. Waite, over work on Highways, 33 82 

Franklin Field, lumber and labor furnished, 36 00 

Peter Saffer, labor on Highways, 14 00 

Herrick Anderson, labor on Highways, 80 00 

L. S. Crafts, " « 17 50 

E. F. Cooley, " « 94 50 

A. E. Strong, over work on Highways, 45 10 

Harvey Moore, for timber and labor, 35 46 

L. P. Dole, labor on foot walk, 8 75 

Dennis Cooley, labor on Highways, 24 00 

Leander Cooley, " " 17 00 * 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for lumber and services on Highways, 393 80 

R. H. Belden, cash paid and work on roads, 148 36 
Wm. H. Dickinson, lumber and labor furnished and cash paid 151 33 

S. G. Hubbard, leveling Swamp Road, 5 00 

D. F. Wells & Bro. for Spikes, 2 00 

Horace Field, labor on Highways, ( 5 00 

Henry R. Graves, over work on Highways, 12 9 4 

STATE AID, 

Paid Mrs. Calvin N. Covill, 
" Emerson L., Covill* 
" Edwin Graves, 

Oliver Warner, 

Lorenz Seitz, 

Joseph Richards, 

David B. Curtis, 

John H. Vining, 

John W. Field, 
" " J. E. King, 
<{ " Alpheus Hathaway, 
*' " Lysander Chaffin, 
" " Henry M. Hitchcock, 
" " Mary Shea, 
i{ Daniel Finn &■ wife, 
" Wm. J. Babcock & wife, 
" Joseph Brothers, 

"$576 20' 



it 


tt 


a 


it 


a 


a 


it 


a 


a 


it 


it 


<( 



■*$j£2iQ& 


65 


48 


00 


84 


00 


12 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


84 


00 


33 


80 


17 


80 


9 


80 


33 


80 


18 


40 


16 


90 


33 


20 


16 


90 


33 


80 


25 


20 


12 


60 



8 



TOWN AID. 

Paid Mrs. Charles P. Waite, 
" John W. Field, 
" " Edwin Graves, 
" " John H. Vining, 



Reimbursements to individuals for money paid for 

recruiting, 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 
Paid Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for Insurance 
on Town Hall, 
" Rev. J. M. Greene, for books and charts, 
" A. M. Peck, recording deaths and labor on burying 

ground, 
" George Waite, services as Assessor, 
" Samuel P. Billings, « 
" Wm. D. Billings, " " and Town Clerk 

and cash paid, 
"■ George L. Morton, serving notices on Town Officers, 
" D. F. Wells, services as Treasurer, 
" Wm. H. Dickinson, cash paid for repairs on Town Hall, 11 40 
" John T. Fitch, taking census and statistics of Industry, 25 50 
" R. H. Belden, " " " " 25 50 

" Wm. H. Dickinson, " " " " 31 50 

" S. G. Hubbard, cash paid for Teachers Institute, 8 00 

" D. F. Wells, Postage and Stamps, 1 00 

*' Calvin B. Marsh, Collecting Taxes and posting warrants, 110 52 



79 


00 


39 


38 


102 


00 


31 


34 


$251 


72 


$3925 00 


30 


00 


6 


90 


4 


50 


38 


75 


45 


00 


81 


45 


6 


80 


25 


00 



$451 82 



Notes and Interest. 

Paid Interest to Savings Bank, 221 58 

" " Mary & Dorothy Morton, . 31 94 

" " Elisha Wells, * 103 81 

" " D. F. Wells & Brother, 5 00 

" " Nelson Clapp, 141 80 

" Note of Mary & Dorothy Morton, 500 00 

Elisha Wells, 1625 00 

« « D> F . Wells & Brother, 125 00 

" Notes of Savings Bank, 2625 00 

$5379 13 

Outstanding Debts of the Town. 

Treasurer's Note to Sophia Smith, 3750 00 

« " Nelson Clapp, 1000 00 

$4750 00 



9 

RECAPITULATION, 



Receipts. 

Balance in Treasurer's hands March 20th, 1865, 

" in Collector's hands March 20th, 1865, 
Amount of Taxes assessed, 
State Treasurer, Recruiting money, 

" " Aid to families of Volunteers, 

" " Corporation Tax, 

Treasurer's Note to Sophia Smith, 
O. C. Shumway, from Liquor Agency, 
G. W. Hubbard, guardian of Philena Orcutt, 
State School Fund, 



Disbursements. 
Old Bills, 

Highways and Bridges, 
Paupers, 
Schools, 
State Aid, 
Town Aid, 
Reimbursement, 
Incidental Expenses, 
Orders of Abatement, . 
Notes and Interest, 
State Tax, 
County Tax, 
Balance in hands of Treasurer to new account. 



$2,080 63 


300 


00 


15,480 


65 


500 


00 


1,993 


09 


726 


43 


3,750 


00 


20 


72 


313 


42 


66 


17 



825,231 11 



616 


80 


2,239 
1,087 
1,566 


65 
14 

17 


576 


20 


251 


72 


3,925 


00 


451 


82 


84 


29 


5,379 13 
6,674 00 
1,294 44 
1,084 75 


$25,231 


11 



WM. H. DICKINSON, ) Selectmen 
REUBEN H. BELDEN, } of 
JOHN T. FITCH, j Hatfield. 

D. F. WELLS, Treasurer, 

March 23, 1866. 



THE NAMES OF 

OUR SOLDIERS 

Who have Died during the War. 



James H. Abbott, 
Jtjdson H. Habbis, 
Elbbidge G. Cliffobd, 
Lobenzo L. Hawkins, 
Thomas Fbabt, jb., 
John Rjchabds, " 
Joseph Bichabds, 
Alonzo Dennis, 
Anthony Bolack, 
Wells Clabk, 
Alphbus Hathaway, 



Wm. R. Wait, 
Chables P. Wait, 
Edwin Gbaves, 
John W. Field, 
Elihtj Covill, 
John H. Vining, 
Lucius Field, 
Henby A. Dickinson, 
Febnando B. Bennett, 
Ebb. C. Andebson. 



.A !N" 3ST IT A. X, 

Report of the School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year 1865-6. 



The amount of money raised by the town the last year, for 
Schools, was $1,500. The town received from the State 
School Fund $66,17. Three Hundred Dollars of the 
Fifteen Hundred were placed in the hands of the u School 
Committee for the purpose of equalizing the length of the 
Schools in the several Districts," which money we disbursed 
as follows : — To the Hill District $17, which enabled them to 
have 26 2-5 weeks of school for the "Upper Department, and 
26 2-5 for the Lower Department. To the Center District $148, 
which enabled the South Center to have 24 4-5 weeks of school, 
and the North Center 24 4-5 weeks, and to the Center "Upper 
Department 12 3-5 weeks. To the West Farms District 
$88,67, which enabled them to have 25 weeks of school. To 
"West Brook District $98.50, which enabled them to have 25 
weeks of school. To Pantry District $14, which enabled 
them to have 26 weeks of school. 

The town will see that the money was so disbursed that the 
Schools were made nearly equal in length. The great dispar- 
ity in the length of Schools, observable in our last Keport, 



was obviated. Yet we have met with embarrassments in exe- 
cuting the vote of the town. Perfect justice, an exact equality 
in the length of Schools, we have not attained. Some Dis- 
tricts paid much higher wages for their teachers than the oth- 
ers. Some of the Schools continued longer in the summer 
than the others, and if they had been reduced correspondingly 
in the winter, many of the larger scholars would have had no 
more than 10 weeks of School during the year. 

If the town can devise some better method of attaining the 
end aimed at in the vote of last year, the Committee would 
gladly be relieved of the responsibility and perplexity of the 
trust. If not, we would recommend that the same amount be 
entrusted to them this year, with the understanding' that they 
control the length of the Summer Schools, which power they 
have by the State law, and thus leave no element of inequali- 
ty except in the wages of teachers. And this might Be largely 
obviated by conference among the Prudential Committees.. 
The money raised is Town not District money, and each child 
in town, whether he resides in a large or small district, should 
have his share of the benefit of it. 

The number of teachers employed during the year has been 
11. Two have been employed both summer and winter. The 
number of children in the town between the ages of 5 and 15, 
is 289, an increase of 20 on last year. The whole number of 
pupils in the Schools 298, an increase of 12 on last year. The 
number of pupils in the Schools that have not drawn money 
by reason of their being under 5 years of age or over 15 years, 
29. Here is a decrease of 13 on last year. The number of 
children in town between the ages of 5 and 15 that have not 
been pupils in the Schools during the year 19. Here is a 
decrease of 6. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The Committee are persuaded that the town needs to give 
attention to the improvement of its School Houses. The 
health of the scholars is impaired, their progress in their stud- 
ies retarded, by badly located, ill-ventilated, or unequally 
heated school-rooms. The natural taste, sense of fitness in 
things, love and habit of order, and refinement of children, are 
not only uncultivated but are deterioated if they are educated 
in ill-constructed and neglected houses. Their associations 
with study and with school in general are rendered unpleas- 
ant, and their natural love of knowledge is sometimes turned 



Into hate. If we desire to have the children of the town grow 
up lovers of books, and become friends and promoters of edu- 
cation, we must render their school-days pleasant. How often 
also it is that a boy or girl gets, in a neat and pleasant school- 
room, an impression of order arid propriety which shows itself 
all through life in his manner, his dress, and his home, 
both without doors and within. If scholars have no respect 
for or pleasure in their school-house as a good thing of its 
kind, the next step is to dislike their studies, then their teach- 
er, then their parents who send them to such a place. School- 
houses should be such as to put the pride of the scholars under 
contribution, and cause it to be a safeguard against indecent 
language or unbecoming conduct. 

It is the duty of the School Committee, in their Eeport, to 
make " such statements and suggestions in relation to the 
Schools as they deem necessary or proper to promote the 
interests thereof." 

We, therefore, deem it our duty to recommend to the Hill 
District that, without delay, they furnish themselves with 
new, commodious, and tasteful school-rooms. One building, 
with an upper and a lower room has some advantages, princi- 
pally in respect to expense. Two houses, separated at a little 
distance by an apartment for wood, have great advantages, in 
the convenience of access, and especially in the freedom which 
the School in one would have from the noise of the other. 
This last consideration is of great importance. 

We recommend to the South Center District that they 
cease to hold a School in the house behind the church. 
In the summer it is so shut in by the surrounding buildings that 
it is neither pleasant nor healthful. But rather use the center 
school-house, which with the new division of the district which 
we shall hereafter recommend, will be the most accessible, 
all the scholars being considered. 

The North Center School House and the one in West 
Brook very much need apparatus for ventilation. The Com- 
mittee have sometimes visited those Schools when the atmos- 
phere of the room was unendurable to one who had just been 
breathing pure air. In such an atmosphere it is impossible, 
for scholars to study, they become restless and destroy the order 
of the School, and they run a fearful risk of contracting pul- 
monary disease, that giant destroyer in Hew England. The 
seeds of the disease are often sown, or, being latent in the sys- 
tem through hereditary causes, they are developed and made 
rapidly to bear their disastrous fruit, by the malarious atmos- 



phcro of some of our School houses. The health of the 
children of the town is a sacred trust committed to them 
whose duty it is to provide places for their education. Let 
the children suffer from the cold rather than bad air. But 
they need suffer from neither. 

SCHOOL DISTKICTS. 

The Committee are of the opinion that the boundaries of 
some of the School Districts should . be changed, or a new 
District be formed. We believe that, if the town adopt the plan 
of a High School, which we recommend in this Eeport', the 
following changes in the boundaries would better promote the 
cause of education than the formation of another district, 
Which would involve considerable additional expense. The 
aim of every town should be to support as few Schools as nec- 
essary, thus securing for the same money greater length in 
their continuance. 

We propose that the Center District be newly divided, run- 
ning the division line so far North as to include in South Cen- 
ter the house of Mr. John Brown. Then we would locate the 
North Center School house in such a place as to render it cen- 
tral to the remaining part of the district. The number of 
scholars in that district, as now bounded, is so large that they 
cannot be accommodated in the present house. Last summer 
the Committee were compelled to transfer some of the schol- 
ars to the South Center. To relieve the Pantry District we 
recommend that as many as ten of the scholars in the North- 
ern part of the District be set off to West Brook, which would 
make a needed diminution of the one and increase of the 
other. 

If these new boundaries should be fixed and the larger 
scholars of the town be furnished with a High School, we 
think convenient accommodation would be provided for all. 

If a new School District is to be formed, it seems to us, that 
the most appropriate place to locate the School house is near 
the Four Corners, a little to the north-west of Mr. Lewis 
Dickinson's residence, and draw the scholars from the Hill, 
Pantry, and North Center Districts. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Your Committee feel that it is th*eir duty to recommend 
some plan by which a higher grade of education can be fur- 



nished our advanced scholars than the Common School offers. 
Our argument is not that the law requires it, but that the in~. 
terests of the town, our duty to the rising generation, econo- 
my in the expenditure of money, our own social, moral and 
intellectual welfare require it. It is our opinion that this town 
pays as much, in proportion to its population, as any town in 
the county, for the cause of education. It is estimated that 
during the past year more than three thousand dollars have 
been paid for the education of scholars abroad. Cannot a 
smaller sum be expended at home and secure as great advan- 
tages to those who go abroad, and extend these advantages to 
others, and at the same time we have in our midst all the mor- 
al, social, intellectual, and religious benefit of such a School ? 
The Town Hall might, at a small expense, be so fitted up 
that it would serve the purposes of a School room. And a 
man, competent to give instruction in the higher English 
branches and the Classics, could be hired forty weeks, for from 
ten to twelve hundred dollars. Then a School could be open- 
ed for thirty or forty of our more advanced scholars from all 
parts of the town. We believe that the stimulating effect of 
a High School upon the Primary Schools wouldbe of incalcu- 
lable worth. The youngest scholars would be looking forward 
to it and make earnest efforts to secure the needed quali- 
fications for admission. "We claim that this would be an 
economical arrangement for the town. Then our children 
could secure at home the education which they now acquire 
abroad, and save to the town between one and two thousand 
dollars yearly. 

PAKENTAL CO-OPEKATIOK 

We would remind parents and guardians that though the 
Committee and the Teachers labor hard for the prosperity of 
the Schools in town, yet it is possible for you to render their 
efforts wholly vain. But you can aid them in many ways ; you 
can often inquire about the school ; you can visit it, not only 
at examinations but during the term ; you can impress upon 
the scholars that the teacher is engaged in one of the noblest 
and most benevolent kinds of work, that she is seeking their 
good, and has assumed the gravest responsibilities with respect 
to them, and that they should treat her with respect, and love 
her for her work's sake ; you can impress upon them that the 
laws of the State require them to submit to her authority, and 
faithfully perform all the duties of the school ; you can form 



the acquaintance of the teacher and encourage her, for she has 
many trials and her heart is often ready to break under the 
heavy load. She has pupils from many families congregated 
together, in such a pursuit that they must be governed or all 
her work is lost ; yet some of them have never been governed 
at home, some are selfish, some boisterous, some sulky, some 
timid, &c, &c. How can a teacher control these different ele- 
ments day after day, and at the same time have her mind em- 
ployed in giving instruction, without feeling that the burden is a 
crushing one? Does she not need your hearty co-operation in 
such a work % Perhaps your children have some peculiarity or 
infirmity. Inform the teacher of it, and thus secure for them 
the sympathy of the teacher and enable her to labor intelli- 
gently for their welfare. 

We are sorry to be compelled to report that an opposite course 
from this has been pursued in some cases in town. Bemarks 
have been made, apparently before the scholars of the school, 
and to the parents of other scholars, adverse to the teacher's 
qualifications. This could do no less than impair the confi- 
dence of the scholars in the teacher, destroy the govern- 
ment of the school, render null the authority of the teacher 
in her instruction, and greatly damage her success. What one's 
reflections must be upon such a course we leave for others to 
decide. To us who value education above gold, and would a 
thousand times rather be guilty of robbing one of his money 
than the opportunity to obtain education, no language is strong 
enough to express our disapprobation of it. 

If parents or guardians are dissatisfied with a school, they 
should guard most sacredly the reputation of the teacher and 
the interests of the scholars, and never utter a disparaging 
word before their children, but seek redress through the Com- 
mittee. To attack the character of the teacher simply upon 
the reports of the scholars is a course which would destroy all 
the schools in the commonwealth. We wish parents would 
consider the high place which schools occupy in respect to all 
of our interests and deliberate well before they, in any irregu- 
lar manner, lay their hands upon them. The Committee have 
the charge of the schools and have the best of opportunities to 
judge of the qualifications of teachers ; they can also remove 
the teachers or make any needed change in the school which 
is necessary for its wehare. And we do earnestly request 
parents to present their grievances to the Committee, and not 
defame the teacher and destroy for the whole district what 
might be a good school. It is impossible for any teacher to 



succeed if a few of the parents array themselves against her, 
while it is a very rare thing that a teacher fails if the parents 
give her their sympathy and support. 



ABSENCE AND TAKDIKESS. 

These are growing evils in some of the schools of the town. 
"We are sure that some parents and guardians would be sur- 
prised on inspecting the school registers, to see the large num- 
ber of marks against their scholars. Parents owe a duty in 
these things to the school and to their children. The best in- 
terest of the school requires that those who enter its classes 
should promptly and regularly perform their duties in those 
classes; otherwise they impede the progress of those who 
would advance more rapidly. It would be considered dishon- 
orable and even worse, in pecuniary matters, for one person 
by negligence and inattention, to prevent another, with whom 
he was associated, from making the largest possible gains. 
Why is it not more so in education ? Education is of more 
value to children than money. In fact it is money and well 
nigh all things else. How then can parents suffer their children 
to defraud other children in this most valuable treasure % But 
to stop others from their largest gains is to defraud them. 
To remedy this let parents not only give their children time 
to attend the school, but see to it themselves that they do at- 
tend punctually and constantly, by often consulting the teach- 
ers, the registers, and the scholars. The habit of punctuality, 
of promptness and faithfulness in the performance of duties, is 
of inestimable worth to any. young man or woman. But this 
habit will be formed, in most cases, only by the constant watch 
and guidance of parents. 

Scholars are also excused from the schools often for the 
most trifling reasons. This habit should be corrected. It en- 
ables them to shirk unpleasant and difficult tasks. It de- 
stroys all habits of regularity and perseverance. Parents can- 
not feel too deeply that this is the sowing time for their 
children, and what they sow they will reap. Every day of 
school should be improved to its utmost. Lost, these prec- 
ious opportunities never return. A rich man at the age of 
fifty exclaimed, " Oh ! my school days that I lost ! I would 
give all my property for the education that I might have ac- 
quired in those lost opportunities ; my wealth furnishes me 
but little happiness without knowledge." Parents may lose 



8 

a few dollars a year by refusing to take their children from 
school to labor, out who can compute the loss to the child if 
he becotaes discouraged, or loses his high esteem of knowl- 
edge, or acquires careless and desultory habits ? It seems to 
us that parents should make almost any sacrifice to enable 
their children to attend without interruption upon their school. 
It is also the right of the child. Do not despoil him of his 
opportunities for education ; in old age he may remind you 
that what you gained was at a fearful expense > 

TEACHERS. 

All the Teachers during the past year have been females. 
We think that with our present school system females, with 
the co-operation of parents and guardians, are the best quali- 
fied to perform the office of teachers in all of our schools. 

We are sometimes inquired of as to the limits of the author- 
ity of the Teacher. We reply that the laws invest the teacher 
with all the authority necessary to keep her school. Other- 
wise the money of the town might be wasted and the aim of 
the State defeated. The State is fully resolved that its children 
shall be educated. The office of a teacher is a most honorable 
and useful one and the laws do their utmost to render it in all 
cases successful. 

We quote the following from the Twenty-Eight Annual 
Report of the Board of Education ; pages 68 and 69, of the Ab- 
stracts. See also pages 107 and 108 of the same. These Ab- 
stracts are made by the Secretary of the Board and are sup- 
posed, to meet his approval. 

" Some teachers and many parents think that the teacher's 
authority ends with the school hours. This is a positive mis- 
take. Courts have settled this question again and again. 
Let us state a few principles : 

1st. The teacher has full control within the school-room 
and in school hours, over the members of the school, subject 
only to the directions of the Committee. 

2nd. Profanity, obscenity, rudeness or insult by pupils, in 
or about the premises, or anything whereby the morals or in- 
terests of the school are injured, is properly cognizable by, and 
subject to the reproof and correction of the teacher. 

3rd. The authority of the teacher extends to anything that 
transpires in passing to and from the school, which may be 
detrimental to its welfare, such as truancy, quarrelsomeness, 
and indecencies. 



9 

The decisions of the supreme courts of several States, (our 
own among others,) sustains teachers in administering disci- 
pline for conduct, words, and insults offered to themselves in 
presence of other pupils, outside of school premises, because 
such conduct has a direct and immediate tendency to subvert 
the teachers authority and beget insubordination. 

4th. Pupils may be retained a reasonable time by teachers 
for purposes of instruction or discipline, — a practice which has 
been sanctioned by long usage and by the authority of School 
Committees, and has been found exceedingly useful. 

These are the principles pertaining to the authority of the 
teacher, of course to be judiciously applied." 

GENEKAL CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

Your Committee think that as a whole, the Schools in the 
town were prosperous during the last year. At the different 
examinations we spoke our words of commendation and cen- 
sure, and therefore here we forbear. Our schools are far from 
what we desire, but with competent teachers, faithful and 
hearty co-operation of parents and guardians, and liberal ap- 
propriations, we feel sure that they will be an .honor to the 
town, and what the children, when grown to manhood and 
womanhood, will look back upon with gratitude and pride. 

JOHN M. GREENE, ) 

KEUBEN H. BELDEN, V School Committee, 

DANIEL W. WELLS, j 

Hatfield, March 17th, 1866. 



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EEPOETS 



OF THE 



Selectmen and School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the lear 1866-7. 



-4— «HM»— *" 



NORTHAMPTON: 
TRUMBULL <£, GERE,... PRINTERS. 

1867. 



SELECTMEN'S REPOKT. 



In settlement with the Treasurer, we find in his hands six 
hundred and sixty-two dollars and thirty-two cents, and due on 
Collector's Bill, ninety-two dollars and eight cents. There are 
some outstanding bills which will reduce that amount. The 
note of Miss Sophia Smith, amounting with- interest to four 
thousand and twelve dollars, has been paid. There is a note still 
held by Nelson Clapp against the Town for one thousand dollars, 
which was borrowed to pay State Aid ; and also a note of three 
hundred dollars to Miss Sophia Smith, which was authorized by 
the town, to build new roads. The town has paid during the 
year, as State Aid, eight hundred and forty dollars, and there is 
due from the State a balance of fifty- two dollars and ten cents, 
making eight hundred and ninety-two dollars and ten cents, to 
be reimbursed by the State. 

♦ 
PAUPERS, 

The expenses for paupers have been less than for several years 
past. At the commencement of the year the town was fully 
supporting five paupers, two of which were in Asylums for the 
Insane, and three were boarded with Mr. Anderson. Some of 
them being in feeble health, the weekly cost was greater than in 
previous years. Theodore Wells died very suddenly on the 
eleventh day of June. In the month of August, Roll a Wells 
came upon the town, to be fully supported, and was sent to Mr, 
Anderson's, but remained only two weeks and "ran away," 
taking his brother Asa with him, and where they now are is 



unknown to us. Ann Dickinson, having been pronounced by 
physicians insane, was removed to the Asylum at Northampton, 
where she died on the twenty-third of November. Oliver 
Bardwell and Francis Abbott, at the Insane Asylums at Brattle- 
boro and Northampton, are the only paupers that have been fully 
supported by the town the past winter. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The Expenditures for Highways and Bridges have been more 
than usual, on account of a new road and bridges. The County 
Commissioners having laid a road from near the house of Wm. 
B. Coleman leading to the depot, a town meeting was called to 
take action in relation to building said road. At the meeting the 
Selectmen were made a Committee to build the road. The order 
of the Commissioners for working the road not having been 
issued, we anticipated the order, and employed H. S. Porter to 
make that part of the road lying east of the Swamp Hill, and a 
short piece near the depot, thinking it for the interest of the 
town to have it done in the Fall rather than in the Spring. 

The bridge over Mill River, near the depot, was undermined 
by the Spring freshets, and after consultation with experienced 
bridge-builders, it was decided to drive piles for the foundation 
of the new bridge. The bridge at West Brook was built with 
heavy stone abutments, believing it economy for the town to 
build strong substantial bridges, if the first cost is somewhat 
increased. We supposed that the bridge over Mill River, near 
the house of Levi Graves, would only need some slight repairing, 
but we found on examination that the timbers were so decayed 
that it was necessary to rebuild it, and it being late in the season, 
it was built in the same style as the old one, without stone abut- 
ments. 

In the month of October, Mr. Thomas Sanderson of Whately, 
while crossing Hill Bridge, had his horse injured by breaking 
through. After notifying us of the same, he claimed that his 
horse was rendered nearly worthless, and demanded two hundred 
dollars as damage. We wished to avoid a law suit, but were 
not satisfied that the injury would be permanent, and declined to 



pay the "sum demanded. We saw the horse a number of times 
during the fall and winter ; and as the horse had not fully recov- 
ered from his lameness, we settled with Mr. Sanderson by paying 
him seventy-five dollars. 

We think that there is no subject that comes before the town, 
that is of more importance than that of providing good and safe 
Roads and Bridges, and yet after the town has increased the 
amount of money to be expended on Highways, and some of the 
Surveyors have expended much more than the amount of their 
tax bills, still it is evident to all who have traveled on our roads, 
that many of them are in bad condition. The Surveyors com- 
plain of the want of proper material to repair the roads in many 
parts of the town, and also the difficulty of procuring help when 
it is most needed, and when it would be of the most permanent 
benefit to the roads to have the money expended. All who have 
attended our annual Town Meetings know how difficult it is to 
procure men of experience and judgment, to take the office of 
Highway Surveyor, and when suitable men are found, to accept 
that trust, and have learned something by experience the best 
manner of repairing roads, they will generally decline serving a 
second term. We are of the opinion that some different plan 
could tee devised by the town, that would be more economical, and 
give better roads. 



EXPENDITURES, 



OLD BILLS. 

Paid Win. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for Patrick 

Dulligan, $ 19 90 

Emerson L. Covill, for work on Highway, 1 00 
Lnman S. Crafts, for Land Damage, 225 00 

S. D. Bartlett, for Overwork on Highway, 15 49 

John E. Waite, " " 3 50 

Kev. John M. Greene, services as School Committee, 29 00 

R. H. Belden, " " " 23 50 

D. W. Wells, " " " 16 95 

Wm. H.Dickinson, services as Selectman andcashpaid 75 50 

R. H. Belden, " " 32 50 

J. T. Fitch, " " 25 50 

Hospital for the Insane, for board of PhilenaE. Orcutt, 84 50 

" " " " Francis Abbott, 90 50 

R. II. Belden, for cash paid for labor on Roads, 21 00 
Trumbull & Gere, for printing Selectmen's and 

School Committee's Reports, 40 00 

Elisha Hubbard, for cash paid for Schools, 10 00 



$U3 84 



PAUPERS. 

Paid H. Anderson, for support of Theodore Wells, $ 37 36 
* " Asa Wells, 60 00 
Rolla Wells, 6 00 
Ann Dickinson, 134 01 
Hospital for the Insane, (Northampton,) for sup- 
port of Francis Abbott, 92 46 
Hospital for the Insane, for support of Philena Orcutt, 74 28 



Forward, 404 11 



Brought Forward, 404 11 

Insane Asylum, (Brattleboro,) for support of Oliver 

Bardwell, 130 00 

0. Marsh, for keeping Transient Paupers, 22 50 

L. S. Bliss, " " " 6 00 

Thomas Cutter, " " " 6 00 

Dr. Myron Harwood, for medical attendance, paupers, 5 50 
Wm. H. Dickinson, expense of Clothing for Paupers 
and Funeral Expenses of Theodore Wells and 
Ann Dickinson, 59 20 

R, H. Belden, cash paid, and services for Paupers, 25 60 



$658 91 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



Paid Herrick Anderson, for Labor on Highways and 

' Bridges, $225 01 
Foster 0. Anderson, for labor on Highways and 

Bridges, 25 00 
Charles E. Kingsley, for labor on Swamp Bridge, 11 50 
John McHugh, " " 10 00 
Thomas Cutter, V " " 4 40 
H. S. Porter, for building road to Depot, and Scra- 
per furnished the Town, 253 00 
J. T. and Geo. C. Fitch, for Timber and Plank 

furnished, 516 32 

E. F. Cooley, for drawing Stone, 21 00 
Wm. H. Dickinson, for Timber and Plank, and cash 
paid- for labor on Bridges, and for labor of men 

and teams, 198 82 

R. H. Belden, cash paid and labor of men and team, 146 36 

John T. Fitch, for services as Bridge Committee, 21 25 

E. B. Wells, for driving Piles at Swamp Bridge, 52 00 

W. Herrick, for Bolts furnished for Bridges, 37 45 

L. S. Crafts, for Labor on Bridges, 53 15 

Lorenz Seitz, " " , 4 50 

A. L. Strong, for Overwork on Highway, 34 52 

$1,620 34 . 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES, 

Paid Calvin B. Marsh, for collecting Taxes and posting 

Warrants, $104 35 

A. M. Peck, for services as Sexton and recording 

deaths, 20 40 

S. M. Smith, for Coffin for Ann Dickinson, 14 50 

Eames, Sprague & Co., Stoves for Town Hall, 24 34 

Thomas Sanderson, Damage to Horse, 75 00 
W. D. Billings, Services as Town Clerk and Assessor,. T7 15 

George Wait, Services as Assessor, It 50 

Samuel P. Billings " " 36 00 
Wm. H. Dickinson, Cash paid for repairs on Town 

Hall, 34 04 
George W. Hubbard, for meeting County Commis- 
sioners, 1 50 
Joseph Billings, Services as Constable. 8 80 
Joseph S. Wells, Services as Treasurer, and cash 

paid for Postage and Stamps, 29 25 



$448 83 



SCHOOLS. 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 




id Mary J. Strong, for services as Teacher, 


$91 00 


Julian, " " 


63 00 


H. A. Cook, " " " 


42 25 


Wm. B. Coleman, for wood furnished, 


44 00 


" " " f *>oard of Teachers, 


152 00 



$392 25 



9 

DISTRICT NO, 2, 

Paid Mary L, Childs, for services as Teacher, $33 50 

Nettie Owen " " " 42 00 
Mary 0. Billings, " " " aiid board, 181 50 

Elizabeth Smith, " " " 52 00 

H. Porter, " " 110 00 

Daniel W. Allis, for boarding Teacher, 33 25 

Ohas Coleman, " " r ". 35 00 

A. M. Peck, " " " 52 00 

S. G. Hubbard, " << " 65 00 

A. M. Peck, for wood furnished, 48 1 5 

S. O. Hubbard, " M . 40 12 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 
Paid Helen McRae, for services as Teacher, 
Mary S. Watkins, 

John W. Morton, for boarding Teacher, 
Oscar Belden, " " " 

R. H. Belden, for wood furnished, 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 
Paid Jane E. Cutter, for services as Teacher, 
H. A. Smith, for Teaching and Board, 
H. Anderson," for boarding Teacher, 
H. Anderson, for wood furnished, 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 
Paid Lottie E. Graves, for services as Teacher, 
Nellie M. Pease, " " " 

Hattie A. Pease, " " 
A.M. Richmond, for wood furnished, 
Henry D wight, " " " 

E. L. Hastings, for boarding Teacher, 
Henry D wight " " " 



$693 


12 


$48 00 


65 


00 


42 


00 


52 


00 


22 15 


$229 ?5 


$36 00 


60 


00 


36 


05 


22 15 


$154 15 


$42 


00 


11 


50 


5 


00 


14 


50 


38 


00 


42 


00 


52 


50 



$265 50 



10 
TOWN AID. 



Paid Mrs, John H. Vining, 


$40 66 


Mrs. Charles P. Wait, 


30 00 


Mrs. John W. Field, 


39 01 


Mrs. Edwin Graves, 


80 01 


STATE AID. 


$189 68 


Paid Mrs. John H. Vining, 


$112 00 


John W. Field, 


112 00 


Edwin Graves, 


112 00 


Ebenezer 0. Anderson, 


112 00 


Joseph Richards, 


112 00 


Alonzo Dennis, 


112 00 


Elizabeth Covil, 


56 00 


E. L. Covil, 


112 00 


- 


$840 00 


NOTES AND INTEREST. 




Paid Note of Sophia Smith, 


$3,750 00 


Interest to " " 


262 50 



$4,012 50 
OUTSTANDING NOTES OF THE TOWN. 
Treasurer's Note to Nelson Clapp, $1,000 00 

" " Sophia Smith, 300 00 

$1,300 00 



KECAPITULATION. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in Treasurer's hands March 23, 1866, 1,084 15 

Amount of Taxes assessed, 13,164 20 

State Treasurer, reimbursement of State Aid, 816 82 

" Corporation Tax, 281 44 



Forward, 16,001 21 



11 

Brought Forward, 
Treasurer's Note, Miss Sophia Smith, 
George W. Hubbard, Guardian of Philena Orcutt, 
State School Fund, 
From Sale of Hearse House, 



DISBURSEMENTS. 
State Tax, 
County Tax, 

Sophia Smith's Note and Interest, 
State Aid, 
Town Aid, 
Old Bills, 

Highways and Bridges, 
Paupers, 
Schools, 

Incidental Expenses, 
Orders of Abatement, 



16,001 21 


300 00 


158 18 


118 35 


14 00 


$16,598 34 


$4,260 00 


1,294 44 


4,012 50 


840 00 


189 68 


113 84 


1,620 34 


658 91 


1,135 31 


448 83 


10 03 



$15 843 94 



Balance in hands of Treasurer to 

new account, $662 32 

Amount uncollected by Calvin B. Marsh, 92 08 154 40 



$16,598 34 



WM. H. DICKINSON, ] 
R. H. BELDEN, 
JOHN T. FITCH. 



Selectmen 

of 
Hatfield* 



Joseph S. Wells, Treas'r. 
March, 20, 1861. 



A :&" isr it a. l 

Report of the School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

Fop the Year 1866-7. 



The amount of money raised by the town the last year for 
Schools was $1500. The town received from the State School 
Fund $118,35. Three Hundred of the Fifteen Hundred Dollars 
were, by vote of the Town, put into the hands of the School 
Committee, for the purpose of equalizing the length of the 
Schools in the several Districts. By error of the Treasurer, the 
$118,35 from the State School Fund were added to the $1200 
remaining after $300 were subtracted from the $1500, and paid 
out to the Districts under the orders of the Selectmen. Thus 
the money from the State School Fund was inadvertently appro- 
priated twice. This makes the whole sum of the Town's 
money used for Schools during the past year, $1618,35. 
The School Committee disbursed the $418,35, as follows : 
To the Hill District $47, which enabled them to have twenty-' 
five weeks of school for the Upper Department, and twenty-five 
weeks for the Lower Department. To the Center District $20 T, 
which enabled the North Center and Soixth Center to have twen- 



ty-five weeks of school each, and the Center Upper Department 
twenty-two weeks. To the West Farms District $107, which ena- 
bled them to have twenty-five weeks of school. To West Brook 
District $57,35, which enabled them to have twenty-fonr weeks 
of school. The Pantry District, with the money drawn upon the 
scholars, had twenty-five weeks of school. 

The nnmber of teachers employed during the year is fourteen ; 
two have been employed both Summer and Winter. 

The number of children in the town between the ages of five 
and fifteen is 312, an increase of 23 on last year. The whole 
number of pupils in the schools is 320, an increase of 22 on last 
year. The number of pupils in the schools that have not drawn 
money by reason of their being under five or over fifteen years of 
age is 45. 

The number of scholars in the schools that have not been ab- 
sent or tardy during the entire year, has been seven ; their names 
are as follows : — Lucj^ Coleman, Louisa Graves, Lucy A. Strong, 
Alice L. Bartlett, Melissa A. D wight, Carrie A. Warner, and 
Henry D. Warner. 

The teachers, in most cases, have been judiciously selected, 
have labored with commendable zeal and prudence, and met with 
as much success as our accommodations for the scholars, and our 
present school system would warrant us to expect. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Your Committee feel it to be their duty to persevere in calling 
the attention of the town to the great evils arising from neglect 
to provide better places for some of the schools. We think we 
are prompted to this by a feeling of benevolence, i. e., a desire to 
guard the health, and promote the physical, intellectual, and 
moral well-being of the rising generation. It is not a wonder 
that that fell scourge, consumption, decimates our population, 
and that many others are invalids. There is cause enough in 
the small, unventiiated, incommodious rooms in which some of 
our schools are kept. The seeds of disease are early sown, and 
in the very bloom of manhood and womanhood comes the bitter 
fruit. The private dwellings in this town are an ornament and 
honor to it ; but this cannot be said of the external appearance 



or the internal arrangements and accommodations of some of the 
buildings in which we are attempting to educate our children. 
We consider them not only a fatal injury to the taste and better 
aspirations of the pupils, a means of preventing the growth of a 
public spirit, and of killing out even the innate desire of knowledge, 
but undesigned instruments of scattering through the town 
sickness, suffering, death. Youth is the time to lay in stores of 
health for the heavy duties of active life, and for old age. But 
what chance has a child for this, who is crowded into a little 
room, and made, for six long hours a day, to inhale the deadliest 
poisons, and to sit in the most constrained positions ? 

To show that we are not drawing upon our imagination for 
these pictures, let us take some facts. The lower room in the 
school house in the Hill District, is 22 feet long by 21 feet 
wide, and seven and a half feet high. The number of cubic 
feet of air which that room contains is 3,465. The number of 
pupils in that school last term was 43. The room has no apparatus 
for ventilation. Physiology tells us that, in order to health, 
each person needs seven* cubic feet of air to inhale each minute. 
God has furnished pure air in the greatest abundance. All out 
doors is full of it at the height of 50 miles. Let these 43 schol- 
ars crowd into that school room. Twelve minutes have not pass- 
ed before that quantity of air has been inhaled by those pupils, 
the oxygen, or life -sustaining property, taken from it and incor- 
porated with the blood, and carbonic acid, which is a deadly 
poison, and hydrogen, made to take its place. Suppose twelve 
minutes to have passed. These scholars must now take that 
impure and deadly air into their lungs and breath it over, in the 
hope that some of the oxygen was left on the first breathing. 
And the next twelve minutes breathe it, still more impure, 
again. Not getting from it what the system demands, the pupils 
become restless, feel an aversion to study, have the headache, 
are weary, and lose their ability to attend to the instruction of 
their teacher. To require children to study and bring out the 
products of the brain under such circumstances is the same kind 

* Dr. Cutter in his Physiology says, "No physiologist pretends that less than 
seven cubic feet of air are adequate for a man to breathe each minute, while Dr. 
Reid allows ten feet." 



of insanity as to put a spider on a bed of live coals and ask it to 
spin its web. The spider will summon all its powers to leap 
from that deadly place. So all the powers of nature in a child, 
thus shut up, will struggle to get that child out of that poisonous 
place into the pure air. The restlessness, the headache, and all 
the discomfort of the child, are so many wise provisions of nature 
to secure its life and health. 

But the school room to which reference is made above, is not 
the only one that needs the attention of the town. The upper 
room in the same district is not what it should be. 

The North Center, and the Center in the rear of the Church, are 
but little better. Also the smallness of most of the school-rooms 
compels the pupils to be so crowded together that, if they had 
pure air, they could not study. Small scholars cannot and 
should not sit still. But any motion is only an interference of 
one pupil with another. 

Enlarged black-boards are also much needed in most of our 
schools. 

The Pantry District needs to be furnished with a room, either 

by hiring or building, in which to put half of the scholars in the 

Winter term. Possibly all might be accommodated in one room 

in the Summer, when the number of pupils is smaller and the 

^ventilation may be more perfect by open windows. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Under this head we would say that it impresses itself upon us 
more forcibly this year even than last, that as a town we are not 
doing our duty in respect to the facilities which we afford the 
young among us for education. We live in a country and an age 
when knowledge is not only usefulness, happiness, power, 
but a necessity. Two hundred and fifty years ago Shakspeare 
said, " Ignorance is the curse of God: Knowledge is the wing 
wherewith we fly to heaven." 

John Lock said : " The difference to be found in the manners and 
abilities of men is owing more to their education than anything else . ' ' 

Addison: " An industrious and virtuous education of children 
is a better inheritance for them than a great estate," . 



Benj. Franklin : u An investment in knowledge always pays 
the best interest.'' 

Edward Everett : " Education is a better safeguard of liberty 
than a standing army. If we retrench the wages of the school- 
master, we must raise those of the recruiting sergeant." 

The inspired penman tells us that "Wisdom and knowledge 
shall be the stability of thy times, and the strength of sal- 
vation." 

While the town is furnished with a sufficient number of Primary 
Schools, it has not one which is suitable to carry the scholars 
forward and fit them for the increasingly responsible duties of 
useful, intelligent, and virtuous citizenship. Everything valuable 
pertaining to the town in the next generation, depends upon the 
fitness which those who are now children, shall have for their 
responsibilities. What has passed for an education with us, is 
far less than will be needed by them. The educational standard 
In all of our towns is raised. A more complete education is 
demanded for the performance of private or public business, for 
Wise action on social or political questions, and for filling offices 
of honor and trust. Ignorance puts the ban upon one and shuts 
the door of opportunity. 

The pupils in our schools are, as far as qualifying them for 
citizenship goes, a trust committed to the voters of this town. 
The law makes their education the care of the town. This it 
does because their education is a public benefit. Property is en- 
hanced in value if it is in an intelligent and virtuous community, 
It is more secure. The social privileges afforded by it are better, 
There is not a worthy interest which is not promoted by the 
education of a community. So that it is just that all, whether 
parents or not, should participate in bearing the expense of edu-^ 
cation. All are benefitted. And it is easy to see that the edu- 
cation must be such as is suited to the times, in order to secure 
the benefits. More is now demanded for enlightened citizenship > 
—therefore more must be done to prepare for it. We are really 
pushing the children now on the stage forward to fight the social 
battles of their time, — to cope with infidelity, intemperance, vice 
in all its forms, — and social and political questions of the gravest im- 
portance . The whole world is brought within speaking distance of 

9 



thern, and they must know more about it than we do. They will 
be met in their conflicts by skilled antagonists, and shall nof we 
furnish them with the skill and the arms needed for an equal 
contest ? Four years ago you would have thought it madness to 
send out soldiers without equipments ? Is it any less madness 
to send our children unequipped into the battles that await 
them? 

We claim, in the language of the 28th Mass. School Keport, 
that " the influence of a High School goes from the school to 
the family. Thus a good High School is adapted not merely 
for the cultivation and refinement of them who receive its imme- 
diate benefits, but it is calculated to exert a purifying and refin- 
ing influence upon society in general, to raise the tone of ed- 
ucation, to set up worthy objects as .the end of life, to incite 
new thought, and start the rising generation from a higher level 
than that on which their fathers stood. Thus - every parent has 
an interest in the High School, even though his children do not 
enjoy its advantages." 

There is sometimes a concise kind of logic that leaps forth, 
Minerva-like, from the deepest convictions of the soul. It is too 
condensed for the intellect to unravel and articulate. Dr. John- 
son, when disputing with a fatalist, uttered the sentence, " We 
know we're free, and there's an end on't." President Lincoln 
when pushed on the subject of slavery, cut the gordian knot by 
the sentence, " If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong." 
These are expressions of the profoundest convictions of the soul. 
But no more so than this : — If the education of the young up to 
a point to fit them for duty in the sphere in which we place them 
to act is not a duty, nothing is duty. This is an impulse, an 
instinct of the Christian heart. 

From some source must come teachers for our common schools. 
During the last year we had the services of fourteen, only two of 
which were from this town, and we furnished only two for the 
common schools in other towns. Is it not our duty, as well as 
privilege, to furnish as many teachers as we have the services of? 
Suppose every town in the State was as deficient in furnishing 
teachers for the public schools as we are ? How soon our sys* 
tern of education woul fall I Other towns are glad to furnish 



us teachers, for they will have schools to fit their youth for this 
office. But do we qualify our youth to fill their teachers' 
chairs ? Is not here a double wrong, first to the school-system 
of the State, secondly to our own youth ? 

Our recommendation for a High School is as follows : Appro- 
priate $1200 to the support of a male teacher, a graduate from 
College, for three terms, one in Summer, one in Autumn, and one 
in Winter ; the three terms to comprise forty weeks. At a small 
expense put the Town Hall in a condition for such school. Let 
this school consist of scholars from all parts of the town. Let 
the town appoint three persons who shall act with the School 
Committee, in deciding what scholars shall have the privileges of 
the school for each term. Incalculable would be the advantages 
of such a school to the town. Instruction would be more thor- 
ough in the Primary Schools. The teachers would be relieved 
of the classes of larger scholars, which now usurp so much of 
their time and strength, and could devote all their energies to 
elementary instruction. The smaller scholars would look forward 
with a laudable ambition to fitness for the High School. It 
would put the older scholars into the possession of those privi- 
leges which they need, to qualify them for the trusts which we 
bequeath to them. We should feel the benign influences of such 
a school in every domestic, social, business, private and public 
interest of the town. 

MORAL EDUCATION. 

We fear that in some of our schools sufficient care is not taken 
of the moral and religious education of the pupils. Profanity is 
sometimes heard about the school-house, and obscenity leaves 
her polluted marks. The daily reading of the Holy Scriptures 
has not in all cases been enjoined by the teachers. 

It is plain that a child is receiving no qualification to be a good 
citizen, unless it is taught to reverence God. The omniscience, 
omnipresence, and perfect moral rectitude of God, cannot be too 
early, and too deeply impressed on the child's mind. That God 
sees it at all times and will punish its wrong doing, is one of the 
most essential facts in the education of a child. The Moral Law 



should be taught, and the habit of discerning God in his works 
and providences should be formed. No less than this is necessa- 
ry in order to train up children to discharge the duties they owe 
to the State. What regard will one have for his oath, if he does 
not fear God ? What is there to restrain one from stealing in 
secret, or committing any crime, if he does not feel that God's 
eye is upon him, and that violated law will surely bring its pen- 
alty ? The laws of our State are very explicit as to the duty of 
moral instruction in the schools. They say, General Statutes, 
p. 216, sec. 10 : 

It shall be the duty of the president, professors and tutors of the univer- 
sity at Cambridge and of the several colleges, of all preceptors and teachers 
of academies, and of all other instructors of youth, to exert their best endeavors 
to impress on the minds of children and youth committed to their, care and in- 
struction, the principles of piety and justice, and a sacred regard to truth ; love 
of their country, humanity, and universal benevolence ; sobriety, industry, and 
frugality ; chastity, moderation, and temperance ; and those other virtues which 
are the ornament of human society and the basis upon which a republican consti- 
tution is founded ; and it shall be the duty of such instructors to endeavor to lead* 
their pupils, as their ages and capacities will admit, into a clear understanding of 
the tendency of the above mentioned virtues, to preserve and perfect a republican 
constitution and secure the blessings of liberty, as well as to promote their future 
happiness, and also to point out to them the evil tendency of the opposite vices. 

Here the law plainly requires the teaching of " piety," i. e., 
affectionate reverence of parents and a regard for all our obli- 
gations to men, and a veneration of the Supreme Being and a 
disposition to know and obey his laws. 

The laws of the State further make it the duty of the School 
Committee to " require full and satisfactory evidence of the good 
moral character of all instructors who maybe employed. " 

Again they say : "The School Committee shall require the 
daily reading of some portion of the Bible in the common English 
version.' ' 

Experience has proved that the above are most salutary pro- 
visions. The Duke of Wellington truly said: "Educate men 
without religion, and you make them but cunning devils/' 
George Washington said : " Of all the dispositions and habits 
which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are 
indispensable supports/' 





We do not advocate the introduction of sectarianism into our 
schools, but we do claim that the great principles of duty to God, 
to our fellow-men, and to self should be taught. The virtues of 
self-control, honesty, truthfulness, temperance, chastity, industry, 
purity of speech, courtesy, patience, faith, energy, hope, persever- 
ence, fortitude, self-denial, kindness, obedience, should be ex- 
plained and enforced. The nature of sin should be pointed 
out, and every pupil made to see how guilt transforms the 
character and self-inflicts punishment. Also the loveliness and 
the claims of Christ as the Savior of men should be taught. It 
is such instruction that sits at the helm and guides a stimulated 
intellect in a safe path. As the child becomes older and sees 
and becomes more widely acquainted his temptations increase 
in number and strength, and how can he resist them except his 
knowledge of duty as well as love and practice of it, have been 
correspondingly increased ? The soldier needs his armor before 
he enters the battle. The child needs to be disciplined and 
•trengthened in virtue, if in manhood he will resist temptations 
to falsehood, theft, and all manner of sin. If moral culture 
is neglected, the more shining the talents and the greater the 
intellectual treasures, the greater will be the wreck and the 
more dangerous the citizen. The State aims so to train up all 
the children that they shall become good citizens. 

Will not then the parents co-operate with the Committee and 
Teachers in their efforts to develope and strengthen the moral 
sentiments of the children and instil into their minds "piety V 

DEFACING SCHOOL HOUSES. 

There is not that regard for neatness and tastefulness in and 
about our school-houses which we desire to see. There is an ap- 
propriateness in all things. Education is especially comely, at- 
tractive, orderly, beautiful. Some of the newer school-houses 
are sadly defaced. We therefore quote the law on this subject, 
(vide General Statutes, p. 803, Sec. 61 :) 

Whoever willfully and maliciously, or wantonly and without cause, de- 
stroys, defaces, mars, or injures, any school-house, church, or other building erect- 
ed or used for the purposes of education or religious instruction, or for the general 
diffusion of knowledge; or any of the out-buildings, fences, wells, or appurtenan- 



10 

ces, of such school-house, church, or other building; or any furniture, apparatus; 
or other property, belonging to, or connected with, such school-house, church, or 
other building ; shall be punished by fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, or by 
imprisonment in the jail not exceeding one year. 

VISITING SCHOOLS. 

There is a very general failure of duty in respect to visiting 
the schools Only two fathers of pupils, excepting the School 
Committee, have visited the schools during the past year, only 
one the final examination. We would simply ask parents if they 
can have any interests more important and that need their per- 
sonal supervision and encouragement more than that of the edu- 
cation of their children. Characters are being formed, disposi- 
tions are being moulded, principles are being implanted, the 
whole future, in this world and the next, is being decided for 
your children. How much your own happiness may depend 
upon any one term of the school ! The trust which you 0000*. 
mit to the teacher is a great one, the work often difficult and dis- 
couraging. Cannot you aid the teacher by your own experience 
in respect to your children ? Cannot you afford her the assur- 
ance that your mind and heart are with her in her great work ? 
The pupils would realize that you set a high value upon educa- 
tion and would be encouraged to persevere in their difficulties if 
they saw you often in the school-room. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
JOHN M. GKEENE, 1 

KEUBEN H. BELDEN, j* School Committee. 
DANIEL W. WELLS, J 
Hatfield, March 25, 1867 , 



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REPORTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen and School Committee 



OP, THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



FOR THE YEAR 1867-8. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS* 

TBUMBULL & GEBB*... STEAM PKINT&BS, 

1808. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



The amount of money raised by the Town the last year, was 
$15,472 40, and with the balance in the Treasury and the re- 
ceipts from other sources, amounted to $17, 802 68, to pay the 
State and County Taxes, and meet the current expenses of the 
year. Although there was no appropriation made to pay the 
Outstanding Notes of the Town, we found by settling with the 
Treasurer that there was money sufficient, and we paid the note 
of $1000 00, held by Nelson Clapp, which was reported last year 
among the Outstanding Notes of the Town. There is still a 
Note held by Miss Sophia Smith, against the Town for $300 00. 
There is $395 80 in the hands of the Collector, which we think 
will be sufficient to pay all outstanding bills, and there is due 
from the State for re-imbursement of State Aid, $711 10. 

PAUPERS. 

The expenses for the support of paupers have been less than 
for many years past. Oliver Bardwell and Francis Abbott, in 
Insane Asylums, are the only persons who have been fully sup- 
ported during the year. On the ninth of October, Lewis Oovill 
was brought to this town by order of the Overseers of the Poor 
of Hartford, Ct., and being insane we had him committed to the 
Insane Asylum at Northampton, where he remained about two 
months. William and Roily Wells, with a little assistance for 
clothing, have been able to provide for themselves. We have 
also rendered aid to the families of Selah and Hosea Wheeler, 
and Francis Ballou. Probably there never was so many appli- 
cations made to the town for. help by Transient Paupers, as 
during the past winter. One was taken to the State Alms House 
at Monson, and one to the Insane Hospital at Northampton, but 
being aliens were no expense to the town except the cost of 
removing them. 



4 
HIGHWAYS. 

The system adopted at the annual meeting to repair the High- 
ways being new, and the responsibility of carrying into effect 
the wishes of the town being left with the Selectmen, we felt 
desirous of giving the experiment a* fair trial, so that the town 
could judge whether it was a more economical way of repairing 
the roads, and at the same time be making permanent improve- 
ments. As we only wanted two men and a team, our greatest 
difficulty was to find a man who was willing to labor faithfully 
himself, and at the same time have experience and judgment 
sufficient to superintend the work. Lysander Ohaffin was finally 
employed at $2 25 per day, and one man to work by the month. 
A team with the necessary tools were purchased, and Mr. Chaffin 
commenced work and continued in the service of the town until 
the ground became frozen in the fall. We were very well satis- 
fied with Mr. Ohaffin, and think that it would be well for the 
town to secure his services for another year, if the present sys- 
tem is to be continued. We think that all who have traveled on 
our roads must have noticed an improvement from former years, 
by finding them in better condition for the public travel, as well 
as by the more permanent repairs made by turnpiking and carting 
clay and gravel. The expenses forhorses, wagon, harnesses, and 
the other necessary tools, was $426 87 ; for Mr. Chaffin and other 
laborers, and for keeping team, and repairing of tools, was 
$915 61, making in all $1,342 48. Mr. Ohaffin worked with 
team and man on Swamp Road and Bridges forty-five days, 
which would have cost the town $315 00, in addition to the 
expense of repairing roads by the old system of Highway Sur- 
veyors, and should be deducted in order to give the ordinary 
cost of repairing the roads, leaving $1,027 48, as the expenses 
for team and labor. One horse died in the fall of the year, and 
Mr. Chaffin has kept, the other horse during the winter for the 
privilege of using him. From the above sum should be deducted 
the present value of the horse, wagon, harnesses, and other 
tools, which we estimate at $215 00, which leaves $752 48, as 
the actual cost of repairing the roads the last year. 



5 
EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BILLS. 



Paid H. & L. Moore, for plank furnished, $ 2 61 

Dr. A. Lewis, for medical attendance on family of 

Selah Wheeler, 10 00 

Thomas Cutter, for keeping Paupers, 

Daniel W. Wells, services as School Committee, 

R. H. Belden, 

Rev. J. M. Greene, " 

Michael Larkin, for overwork on Highways, 

Henry M. Field, 

Antoine Allair, for clay furnished, 

Calvin B. Marsh, for serving Warrants, 

R. H. Belden, for Services as Selectman, 

J. T. Fitch, 

Wm. H. Dickinson, " " 

E.G. South wick, for damage received on Highways, 

Hospital for the Insane, Northampton, for the sup- 
port of Francis Abbott and Ann Dickinson, 

Charles N. Coleman, for labor on Highways, 

Trumbull & Gere, for printing Selectmen's and 
School Committee's Reports, 



1 


50 


20 


15 


21 


50 


21 


00 


59 


51 


4 43 


13 


04 


3 


00 


21 


T5 


26 


75 


66 25 


3, 32 


00 


110 


00 


5 


00 


49 


16 



$480 24 



PAUPERS. 



Paid Hospital for the Insane, lor the support of Francis 

Abbott, $ 95 00 

Vermont Asylum for the Insane, for the support of 

Oliver Bardwell, 130 00 

L. S. Bliss, for keeping Transient Paupers, 55 00 

Dr. A. Lewis, for medical attendance on the family 
. of Selah Wheeler, 50 00 



Forward, $330 00 



6 . - 

Brought Forward, $330 00 

Dr. A. Lewis, for medical attendance on Lewis 

Covill, and the family of Francis Ballou ,^\ 7 00 

J. T. Fitch, for cash paid for Clothing for Rolla Wells, 6 75 
Fitch Brothers & Doane, Provisions furnished 

Hosea Wheeler, 10 26 

Fitch Brothers, and Porter, for Wood furnished H. 

Wheeler, 10 75 

Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid and services for 

Paupers, 43 15 



$408 51 
HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Lysander Chaffin, for services on Highways, and 

cash paid for Tools and repairing, $406 30 

Alexander Hade, for labor on Highways, - 155 54 

Thomas Boyle, for labor on Swamp Road, 18 00 

25 00 
12 50 
22 00 
35 25 
19 25 
63 00 



John Leary, 

Jeffrey McGrath, 

Wm. Hurley, 

John Kiley, 

Patrick McGrath, 

William Powers, 

John Keatz, labor on Highways, 7 87 

Foster C. Anderson, for Horses and Wagon, 350 00 

Philip Carl, for Harnesses, 55 00 

Charles E. Hubbard, for labor on Swamp Road, 100 00 

Alonzo Sweet, for stone furnished, and labor on 

Swamp Road, 70 00 
H. Anderson, for labor on Bridges and Swamp Road, 103 03 

Jacob Carl, for labor on Swamp Road, 53 50 

A. Crosset, for Hay furnished, 19 40 

Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for Hay, 17 05 

Leander Cooley, for labor on Pine Bridge, 27 00 

Luman S. Crafts, " " 21 25 

Wm. M. Jones, for board of A. Hade, 109 74 

L. Mclntyre, Tile for Culverts, 23 25 

Forward, $1,713 93 



Brought Forward, $1,713 93' 

W. Herrick, for Bolts, IT 15 

C. K. Morton, for labor on Swamp Road, 20 00 

J. D. Brown, for labor and railing for Swamp Road, 58 20 
L. S, Bliss, for labor on Highways, and for Guide 

Board, 8 50 

S. G. Curtis, for labor on Hill Bridge, 6 00 

Antoine Allair, for Gravel furnished, 31 10 

H. S. Porter, for labor on Swamp Road, 61 24 

John T. & Geo. C. Fitch, Hay furnished, 55 30 

Fitch Brothers, and Porter, for Meal, 140 10 

Fitch Brothers, and Porter, for Plank and Timber, 263 92 

J. T. ■& Geo. 0. Fitch, for Plank and Timber, 179 12 

R. H. Belden, labor furnished on Roads and Bridges, 60 12 
Wm. H. Dickinson, cash paid and labor furnished 

on Roads and Bridges, 120 18 

J. T. Fitch, services on Roads and Bridges, . 5 00 
Patrick Powers, for work on Swamp Road and West 

Brook Bridge, 36 T5 

Rhoads & Kingsley, for Bolts, 5 TO 



$2,182 31 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 



Paid W. G. Shattuck, for Desks and Seats for Town 

Hall, 
Batchelder & Dinsmore, for labor on Town Hall, 
Wm. Daugherty, for painting Town Hall, 
R. H. Belden, expense on School Furniture, 
John E. Doane, for notifying Town Officers, 
Wm. D. Billings, for Services as Town Clerk 

and Assessor, 
C. K. Morton, for services as Assessor, 
Samuel P. Billings, " 
A. M. Peck, for recording deaths, and labor on 

cemetery, 6 50 

Wells & Bardwell, for Screws and Nails for Town 

Hall, 5 60 



$205 50 


112 


34 


169 


50 


13 


00 


3 00 


82 


00 


SI 


50 


35 


00 



Forward, $609 U 



8 

Brought Forward, $669 94 

J. S. Wells, services as Treasurer, and cash paid, 26 15 
S. G. Hubbard, for services on Town Hall, 6 00 

George W. Dickinson, for collecting Taxes and 

serving warrants, 83 50 

Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for repairing 

Town Hall, and for Insurance, 
Fitch Brothers & Doane, Nails, etc., for Town Hall, 
J. T. & George 0. Fitch, Lumber for Town Hall, 
Fitch Brothers and Porter, " " 

Wm. H. Dickinson, for labor repairing Town Hall, 
J. S. Wells, cash paid and labor on Town Hall, 
Daniel W. Wells, for Text Books and repairs on 

Town Hall, 

$986 85 



29 87 


1, 8 43 


49 97 


74 81 


12 20 


15 73 


i 

9 65 



SCHOOLS 



HIGH SCHOOL. 
Paid Mary A. Clark, for services as Teacher, 
E. 0. Winslow, 

S. G. Hubbard, for board of Teacher, 
C. M. Billings, 

Philas Doane, for sawing wood, 
J. E. Porter, for making fires, 
Wm. P. Allis, for wood furnished, 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, wood furnished, 



DISTRICT NO. 1, 



$131 00 


120 


00 


88 


00 


72 00 


11 


33 


5 00 


13 


50 


50 


00 



$490 83 



Paid M. J. Strong, for services as Teacher, $ 91 25 

Helen A. Cook, " " 84 50 

Levi Moore, for board of Teacher, 104 00 

H. S. Porter, " " 112 00 

$391 75 



9 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Paid Louisa A. Maynard, for services as Teacher, $ 42 00 

Helen L. Kellogg, " " 48 00 

L. Adelia Weeks, " *' 56 00 

Lizzie A. Smith, " " 10 00 

A. M. Peck, for board of Teacher, 104 00 

C. M. Billings, " " 56 00 

S. G. Hubbard, "" " 48 00 

G. W. Dickinson, for wood, 25 00 

A. M. Peck, " 10 00 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Paid Nellie M. Stearns, for services as Teacher, 
Mary S. Smith, 
Eliza F. Winslow, 

S. D. Bartlett, for board of Teacher, 
Austin S. Jones, " " 

Sanford S. Belden, for wood furnished, 
S. D. Bartlett, for preparing wood, 



$459 00 



$36 


00 


6 


50 


30 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


23 


37 


6 


00 



$191 87 



DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Paid Eliza J. White, for services as Teacher, 
Horace Wait, for board of Teacher, 
Horace Wait, for wood furnished, 



$ 91 00 

88 00 
1 50 

$186 50 



DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Paid Nellie M. Pease, for services as Teacher, 
Ruth E. Livermore, " " 

Henry D wight, for board of Teacher, 
Ebr. D wight, for wood furnished, 



$ 63 00 

Y5 00 

101 50 

35 00 



$214 50 



10 



STATE AID. 



Paid Mrs. Mary Richards, 
Mrs. Clara W. Vining, 
Mrs. Ursula B. Graves, 
Mrs. Ruth S. Dennis, 
Mrs. Minerva Anderson, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Covill, 
E. L. Covill, 



TOWN AID. 

Paid Mrs. Ursula B. Graves, 
Mrs. Lucy M. Field, 
Mrs. Clara W. Vining, 
Mrs. Helen M. Wait, 



$118 61 
NOTES AND INTEREST. 

Paid Note of Nelson Clapp, and interest, $1,125 00 

OUTSTANDING NOTE. ' 

Treasurer's Note to Sophia Smith, $300 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in Treasurer's hands, March 20, 1861, 

Amount of Taxes assessed, 

State Treasurer, re-imbursement of State Aid, 

11 " Corporation Tax, 

State School Fund, 
Liquor Agent, 
A. M. Peck, lot in Cemetery, 



$96 00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


8 


00 


31 


00 


$519 


00 


$80 00 


35 


33 


28 


61 


34 61 



$ 154 40 


15,412 40 


100 00 


663 42 


160 46 


50 00 


2 00 


$11,802 68 



it; 

disbursements. 



State Tax, 


$7,100 00 


County Tax, 


1,618 05 


Interest on State Tax, 


76 48 


Note of Nelson Clapp and Interest, 


1,125 00 


^tate Aid, 


519 00 


Town Aid, 


178 67 


Old Bills, 


480 24 


Paupers, 


408 51 


Highways and Bridges, 


2,788 01 


Schools, 


2,000 45 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


986 85 


Orders of Abatement, 


131 32 


Amount uncollected by G. W. Dickinson, 


395 80 




• $17,802 68 


WM. H. DICKINSON, ] 


Selectmen 


R. H. BELDEN, j 


' of • 


JOHN T. FITCH, J 


Hatfield. 



Joseph S. Wells, Treasurer. 
March 23, 1868. 



A. ]ST 2ST tl A. L 

Report of the School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year I867-8 B 



To the People of Hatfield, Greeting : It is with no little sensi- 
tiveness that your Committee present this report, following as it 
does others so ably written and so full of valuable suggestions 
and salutary advice. 

While Statute law makes it proper for the School Committee 
to give advice and make suggestions, it is our purpose not in any 
way to take advantage of this provision. But we do deem it 
advisable to call the attention of the town to some items in pre- 
vious reports. 

By vote of the town $2000 was raised for schools and placed 
in the hands of the Town School Committee, "To be used by 
them at their discretion, for the support of Schools the ensuing 
year." 

The town received from the State School fund $160,40. 

There has been expended for the High School — thirty-four 
weeks— $490,83. 

In District No. 1, twenty-seven weeks, $391, 75, 
" No. 2, twenty-six weeks, $459,00. 

" No. 3, twenty-four weeks, $197,87. 

" No. 4, twenty-six weeks, $186,50. 

" No, 5, twenty-nine weeks, $284,15, 



2 ; 

The number of teachers employed is fourteen ; three have been 
employed both summer and winter. 

The number of children in town between the ages of five and 
fifteen, is two hundred and eighty-six. The number of pupils in 
the schools is three hundred and twenty-two. The number of 
pupils in the Schools under five and over fifteen years of age, is 
thirty-six. 

The average attendance of Scholars in town for the Summer, is 
two hundred and thirty-nine ; in winter, two hundred and sixty- 
four. 

HIGH SCHjOOL. 

In accordance with the vote of the town, the Selectmen had 
the Hall put in order and furnished it with seats and desks suit- 
able for school purposes. The school commenced May 1th, Miss 
Mary A. Clark, of South Hadley, teacher. She taught this 
school through the summer and fall terms, with credit to herself 
and profit to the scholars. During the winter the school was un- 
der the instruction of Edward 0. Winslow, an experienced 
teacher, a student of high standing in Amherst College. He 
labored earnestly, and we think in a good degree successfully. 
One thing which tended apparently to hinder the fullestfsuccess 
of this school, was, that the minds of the scholars were in some 
measure diverted from their studies by other objects. 

The cultivation of the social faculties, without doubt is impor- 
tant and surely ought not to be neglected, but it should not 
encroach upon the time which more properly belongs to school 
duties. We cannot say to what extent this prevented the perfect 
success of the school, being a matter beyond the control of the 
teacher, and for which the parents and guardians alone are 
responsible. The establishment of the High School greatly in- 
creased the responsibilities of the Committee. Its friends have 
watched its progress with considerable interest during the year, 
and if all the benefits resulting from it, which may have been 
pictured to the imagination, have not been fully realized, yet in 
our opinion it should be continued. 

DISTRICT SCHOOLS, 

We would not go into detail in regard to the particular suc- 
cess of the teachers in our several districts, but say that on the 
whole, fair satisfaction has been given. 



Qur Registers show quite the usual number of marks of 
absence and tardiness, and in many cases on a line with the same 
names as in years past. We would just like to ask the parents 
of these children if they knew they were not getting their full 
share of the school money. We can but hope that this fact will 
in part be a sufficient incentive to them to see that their scholars 
are constantly, and promptly, in their places in school. 

Mr. Ebenezer Dwight will no doubt be surprised to learn that 
he alone of all the fathers in town, (the Committee excepted,) 
has visited a school during the year, aside from the regular exam- 
ination days. — Brethren these things ought not so to be. — But we 
are happy to say that more of the mothers have manifested their 
interest in the schools. 

By refering to your Committees' report of ? 65 and '66, we 
find one district recommended to "furnish themselves without 
delay with new, commodious, and tasteful school rooms." To 
another "that they cease to hold a school in the . house behind 
the church, because it is neither pleasant or healthful, but rather 
use the Center School House." 

The great need of apparatus for ventilation as a sanitary 
measure, is spoken of in other districts. 

Last year your Committee felt it to be their duty to persevere 
in calling the attention of the town to the' same subject, taking 
for a text "all that a man hath, will he give for his life." Sick- 
ness, suffering and death, were vividly portrayed to the minds of 
parent and child, in accordance with the most approved princi- 
ple of learned Physiologists, and we could almost see — at least in 
our imagination — our children running from these places where 
the seeds of death are so thickly cast, and our old school houses 
vacated. But these considerations, fearful to contemplate as 
they then appeared to your Committee, have not seemed to have 
the desired effect ; perhaps for good and sufficient reasons. 

We are a democratic community, claiming independence of 
thought as well as action, and very likely old fashioned in some 
ofour ideas, slow to adopt new theories, or accept plans proposed 
which have not been fully tested according to our notions of the 
fitness of things. We may think that possibly there may be 
some mistake in those nice calculations, making just so much 
space needed for each scholar, and just so much pure air necessa- 
ry to sustain life. 



Without doubt the parents of the children in Hatfield desire 
their life, health and happiness, and would do all in their power to 
secure it, and when the different districts feel that in order to ac- 
complish this, new school houses are needed, they will build them, 
if not after the plans suggested, as they in their wisdom shall 
decide. 

All of which is respectfully Submitted, 

REUBEN H. BELDEN, 1 

JAMES PORTER, j- School Committee. 

DANIEL W. WELLS, I 






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REPO R T 8 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



Ttmm td JjtfatMxIj 



FOR THE YEAR 1868-9. 



NORTHAMPTON ', 

TRUMBULL & GERE, STEAM PRINTERS. 
1869, 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



In making our report of the receipts and expenditures of the 
town for the past year, we find a balance in the treasury of more 
than will be needed to pay all of the outstanding bills against the 
town, thus leaving the town free from debt. There is also due 
from the State for re-imbursement of State Aid a sum sufficient 
to meet the payments that will have to be made by the town for 
State Aid during the coming year. 

There has been but little change in the manner of supporting 
Paupers since our last report. Francis Abbott and Oliver Bard- 
well remain in Insane Asylums. Wm. Wells has received aid for 
clothing during the year, and for a short time has been fully sup- 
ported by the town. Mary Ryan, with her child, who had no 
settlement in the town, were a charge for a few weeks, as they 
were not able to be removed to the alms house. The child was 
subsequently deserted by the mother, and being sick had to be 
provided for until she was able to be removed to the State Alms 
House. The town of Whatelyhas commenced a suit against the 
town for the care of Eunice Bardwell during her last sickness. 
A full statement of the case will be made at the annual meeting. 
We have had about the usual number of Transient Paupers, 
many of whom we believe to be vagrants, and get their living by 
calling on the overseers of the poor for help. 

Last year we reported in favor ofphe present system of re- 
pairing the Highways, and after the experience of another year, 
we are still in favor of continuing the same system, although we 
are aware that the roads have not been as well cared for as in the 



previous year. We regretted that Mr. Chaffing previous en- 
gagements prevented giving his whole time to the repairs of 
roads and bridges. We are of the opinion that success depends 
very much upon having a suitable man to superintend, who has 
no other business that will interfere with his work on the roads. 
If by a liberal- offer from the town, Mr. Chaffin or some other 
competent man, could be induced to devote his whole time during 
the summer to the town, we feel confident that the roads and 
bridges would be kept in good repair, and at less expense than 
by the old system of Highway Surveyors. The bridge at Brook 
Hollow has been rebuilt during the year and repairs have been 
made on other bridges so that we consider them safe for the 
public travel. 

The matter in relation to the leveling of the ground in the old 
burying ground having been referred to the Selectmen, we exam- 
ined the grounds, but finding a large number of graves without 
stones to mark the place, we were unwilling to obliterate all 
marks of graves without the knowledge of relatives or friends of 
those who were buried there. We think that some action should 
be taken by the town to give public notice that after a specified 
time the town would proceed to make the necessary improve- 
ments where individuals neglected to do it. 

In consequence of the action of the town, abolishing the School 
Districts, a committee was appointed to make an appraisal of the 
property belonging to the several School Districts. The whole 
amount of their appraisal was Thirty-One Hundred and Twenty- 
Nine Dollars, which was, by the Assessors, added to the town 
grant in making the assessment of taxes. The amount due the 
several tax-payers was deducted from their tax. In school dis- 
trict No. 5, every tax-payer was credited with the whole amount 
of their tax, and there is a balance of One Hundred and Thirty 
Dollars and ninety-two cents still due to the District. 



5 

EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BILLS. 

Paid Lysander Chaffin for labor on Highways, $11 00 
K. H. Belden, for work on Highways and 

taking Pauper to State Alms House, 23 90 
Richard Fitzgerald, for digging grave for 

Eliza ^Wheeler, 3 00 

Hospital for the Insane, for board of Lewis 

Covill, 39 07 

Do., for board of Francis Abbott, 95 30 

James Nolan, going to Northampton for 

coffin, 3 00 

Daniel W. Wells, services as School Com., 24*20 
Trumbull & Gere, for printing reports, 36 00 
Fitch Brothers & Porter, for wood, 29 00 

John T. Fitch, for services as Selectman, 

and cash paid, .32 00 

R. H. Belden, for services as Selectman, 

and cash paid, 28 00 

Wm, H. Dickinson, for services as Select- 
man, and cash paid, 61 50 
CO. Dickinson, for stone furnished, 5 00 
James Porter, services as School Com., 32 00 
Charles Potter, for labor on Highways, 2 80 
R. H. Belden, cash paid for getting teachers, 9 00 
R. H. Belden, services as School Com., 35 00 



$469 11 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Lysander Chaffin, for labor and cash paid,$721 39 
L. Mclntire, for drain pipe, 193 50 

Erastus Cowles, for Hay, 41 30 

C. N. Covill, for labor on Bridge, 13 50 

Antoine Allair, for drawing stone, and for 

earth, 40 45 



Forward, 81,010 14 



6 

Brought Forward, 81,010 14 

Marshall N. Hubbard, for drawing drain 

pipe, 5 00 

Batchelder & Dinsmore, labor on Bridges, 12 88 
Fitch & Porter, for Lumber and Meal, 463 02 
J. T. & Geo. C. Fitch, for Lumber and 

Labor, 83 42 

R. H. Belden, for labor on Highways, IT 50 

Wm. H. Dickinson, cash paid and labor on 

Highways, 23 65 

$1,615 61 



PAUPERS, 

Paid Hospital for the Insane, for board of Fran- 
cis Abbott, 95 65 
Vermont Asylum for the Insane, for board 

of Oliver Bardwell, 130 00 
Mrs. Joseph Richards, for care of child, 23 00 
Dr. A. Lewis, medical attendance on fam- 
ily of Selah Wheeler, 12 00 
Wells & Bardwell, for clothing for pauper, 5 00 
Mrs. Dulligan, for care of Mary Ryan, 45 00 
R. H. Belden, cash p'd and care of paupers, 18 10 
Wm. H. Dickinson, cash paid for clothing 

and care of paupers, 24 20 

L. S. Bliss, for keeping transient paupers, 27 50 



$380 45 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid H. S. Porter, for loss of horse and other 

damage at Hill Bridge, $325 00 

A. M. Peck, cash paid for repairs on 

Hearse, 25 00 

A. M. Peck, recording deaths and work 

on burying grounds, 13 00 

Charles D. Bartlett, for repairs on School 

House, 5 00 



Forward, $368 00 



Brought Forward, 8368 00 

Wm. D. Billings, for services as clerk, and 
recording, 34 90 

Leander Cooley, for services as Assessor, 31 50 

H. P. Billings, " " " 53 15 

C. K. Morton, " " " 50 00 

J. S. Wells, for services as Treasurer and 

cash paid, - 21 25 

Wm. H. Dickinson, for cash paid for re- 
pairs on Town Hall and School Houses, 1 26 

James Porter, for cash paid for repairs on 

School Houses, 19 00 

R. H. Belden, cash paid for Stoves and re- 
pairs, books and furniture for Schools, 61 95 

G. W. Dickinson, for services as Collector 

and Constable, ,111 .00 

_ $?82 61 



SCHOOLS. 
Paid Miss M. J. Strong, services as teacher, $219 00 



Miss Julia Ballentine, 


t( , t( 


126 50 


Miss Lizzie A. Smith, 


(t a 


110 00 


Miss Nellie M. Dayton, 


tt tt 


96 00 


Miss Ruth E. Livermore, 


tt tt 


56 00 


Mrs. Mary E. Miller, 


I . it 


116 00 


Miss Fanny 0. Morgan, 


tt tt 


36 00 


Miss Mary S. Smith, 


It tt 


39 00 


Miss Fanny Stearns, 


ft tt 


32 50 


Miss Mary Kellogg, 


tt (I 


84 00 


Miss Emma Rhood, 


tt It 


66 00 


Miss Ella M. Graves, 


tt tt 


36 00 


Miss Augusta Porter, 


tt tt 


90 00 


J. E. Miller, 


tt tt 


50 00 


A. J. Tittsworth, 


It ft 


135 00 


C. W. Rhood, for board of Teachers, 


96 00 


Geo. C. Marsh, '•' 


tt 


48 00 


L. S. Bliss, 


tt 


228 00 


N F. Abells, 


tt 


52 60 



Forward, 11,833 



8 

Brought Forward, $1,836 60 

Horace Wait, for board of Teachers, 113 50 

Chas. E. Hubbard, "- " 116 00 

Oscar Belden, " " 40 00 

Rev. Wm. L. Bray, " ": 16 00 

Elihu Marsh, " " 40 00 

Philos Doane, for sawing wood, 26 83 

John Karon, " " 1 00 

Horace Wait, for wood furnished, 1 00 

John E. Wait, for sawing wood, 6 00 

Wm. B. Langdon, for brooms furnished, TO 

J. T. & G-. 0. Fitch, for wood furnished, 104 92 

Fitch & Porter, " " " 24 00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, " " " 26 1 5 
Wells & Bardwell, Merchandize for Schools, 1 58 

Henry G. Moore, for board of teacher, 48 00 

$2,528 88 



STATE AID. 




Paid Mrs. Mary Richards, 


$96 00 


Mrs. Clara W. Vining, 


96 00 


Mrs. Ursula B. Graves, 


96 00 


Mrs. Ruth S. Dennis, 


96 00 


Mrs. Minerva Anderson, 


96 00 


E. L. Covill, 


18 00 


TOWN AID. 




Paid Mrs. Ursula B. Graves, 


$88 33 


Mrs. Helen M. Wait, 


37 34 


Mrs. Clara W. Vining, 


35 34 



$498 00 



$161 01 

NOTES AND INTEREST. 
Paid Note of Miss Sophia Smith and interest, $342 88 

Payments to School Districts for School 

Houses. 

$194 00 

816 00 

1,200 00 
138 00 

050 08 

„__ $2 ; 998 08 



Paid District No. 1, 


tt 


" 2, 


a 


" 3, 


a 


'* 4 


it 


" 5, 



9 

RECAPITULATION. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in Treasurer's hands, March 23, 1868, $395 80 

Amount of Taxes assessed, 13,190 19 

0. 0. Shumway, balance due as Liquor Agent, 71 40 

W. P. Strickland, from License fees, 50 00 

L. S. Bliss, percentage on liquors sold, 4 14 

State Treasurer, re-imbursement of State aid, 576 00 

Corporation Tax, 421 80 

State School Fund, 129 18 

Fitch & Porter, for Drain Pipe, 25 00 





$15,410 11 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




State Tax, 


• $2,840 00 


County Tax, 


1,618 05 


Note of Miss Sophia Smith and Interest, 


342 88 


State Aid, 


498 00 


Town Aid, 


161 01 


Old Bills, 


469 11 


Schools, 


2,528 88 


Highways and Bridges, 


1,615 61 


Paupers, 


380 45 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


182 61 


Assessors' Orders of Abatement, 


35 97 


State Sealer of Weights and Measures, 


10 50 


School Districts, 


2,998 08 




$14,281 81 


Balance in hands of Collector and Treasurer, 


1,188 30 





$15,410 11 


WM. XL DICKINSON, 


\ Selectmen 
) 


R. H. BELDEN, 


J. T. FITCH, 


JOSEPH S, WELLS, Treasurer. 




Hatfield, March 22d, 1869, 





ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Soliool Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending April, 1869. 



The Town at their last annual meeting having abolished the 
School Districts, and thereby relieving Prudential Committees 
from all responsibility respecting the Schools and care of School 
Houses, increased the duties of the General Committee to a 
greater extent than on any previous year. The procuring of 
Teachers, supplying them with boarding places, as well as the 
more minute wants of each School, we have endeavored to at- 
tend to, to the best of our ability; and if any School has suffered 
in consequence of any failure to be prompt in these minute obli- 
gations, it has not been from any unwillingness on our part to 
supply each and every need. It is not our design at this time to 
discuss the workings or merits of the present system, in compar- 
ison with the old one. At the same time it is obvious to all 
that every little want cannot be as promptly and conveniently 
supplied, by a Committee who may be living from one to two 
miles from a School House, as if they were residing in the im- 
mediate vicinity. It has been our aim to retain those Teachers 
who have proved themselves efficient and successful. 



12 

All the Schools in the Town have been continued an equal 
length of time, thus giving to our children the advantages of 
thirty- four weeks' schooling. 

By vote of the Town Twenty Five Hundred Dollars was raised 
for the support of Schools. 

The amount received from the State School Fund, was one 
hundred and twenty-nine dollars and~eighteen cents, ($129,18.) 

There has been expended for the High School, ex- 
clusive of wood and other incidental expenses, - $411 50 

For Schools on the Hill, - - - - 538 00 

in the Street, - 552 00 

" at the Farms, - - - - 358 50 

" at West Brook, - - -- 229 00 

at AYest Hatfield, - - - 213 00 

Thero have been fourteen different Teachers employed in our 

Schools. Three have been continued through the year. 

By the Assessor's returns we find that the number of children 
in Town between the ages of five and fifteen to be 291. 

We find the greatest number of pupils in our Schools at any 
one time, to be 357. The average attendance in Summer, 241 ; 
Fall, 229 ; Winter, 275. 

It will not be our aim to particularize in regard to the different 
Schools, but say in a word that the Teachers were all sufficiently 
qualified in literary attainments, to do what was expected of 
them, and though we found in some instances success was more 
marked than others, still on the whole we think the progress 
made will compare favorably with other years. We could point 
to Schools that have been models of good order, and a commend- 
able degree of ambition excited, which made it evident to. every 
close observer that not only the time during school-hours was 
fully improved, but that the stimulus created during the six 
hours of the day, was carried into the home circle. 

It gives us pleasure to notice that in some Schools there has 
been effort put forth by the scholars in regard to punctuality, so 
that they were able to show against their names at the close of 
school a clean register, and we also notice that there has been 
quite a number who have made clean work through the entire 
year, (not having been tardy or absent once.) This is a step in 
the right direction. 



13 

Allusion was made in last year's report to delinquencies in 
this respect by those whose registers show from year to year 
continued indifference in attendance. We still desire that our 
Foreign population could see that their children by their incon- 
stancy, not only are losers themselves, but are great obstacles to 
others who would make progress. 

Much has been already written in previous Reports, respecting 
School Houses, and in bringing up this subject again it may 
seem to appear like trespassing upon the patience of our towns- 
men. We allude to what was said in last year's report, namely, 
— that the good judgment and wisdom of our people would actu- 
ate them in the erection of new School Houses. 

That there is much that needs to be done, without delay, in 
the way of rebuilding and repairing, is evident to all. Still we 
feel confident that the Town will by their action decide as to the 
better course to be pursued in regard to this whole matter. And 
when this shall have been accomplished we would like to see all 
our Schools supplied with a new set of Geographical Outline 
Maps, as the present ones are nearly worn out. 

Much has been said, and much more might, be said, with refer- 
ence to the importance of looking well to the education of our 
children, but we will close this Report with a single remark : — 

Education which is practical, 1 hereby giving a large amount 
of general information with corresponding moral and religious 
instruction, should ever be our aim in our appropriations. 

REUBEN H. BELDEN, \ School Committee 
JAMES PORTER, V of the 

THADDEUS GRAVES, J Town of Hatfield. 



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REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN 



AND 



OF THE 



* $< Xntfftll 



FOR THE YEAR 1869-70. 



NOKTHAMPTON : 
TRUMBULL & GERE, STEAM PRINTERS. 

1870. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



In making our Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of 
the Town for the past year, we find a large indebtedness, owing 
principally, to the greatly increased cost of repairing damages 
done to Highways and Bridges, by the heavy rains and high 
freshets. 

At the commencement of the year, the Town owned but one 
horse, which it was deemed best to dispose of, and to purchase 
a new team. We therefore procured a double team, at a cost of 
$500.00, disposing of the old horse for the sum of $38.00. 
These horses are now on hand in an improved condition . 

We were unable to secure the services of Mr. Chaffin, upon 
the Highways, owing to previous engagements. A contract 
was therefore made with 0. N. Coleman, to take charge of the 
Roads and Team, at a cost of $3 per day. We also hired Mr. 
Warner, at a cost of $2.25 per day. They have devoted their 
time upon the Roads and Bridges, to our entire satisfaction. 

We have rebuilt one bridge upon the Swamp road near the 
Depot, and the bridge over Mill river, at " Middle Going Over," 
and also put in a new bridge at West Brook, on the new road 
near Luman Crafts' . The stone culvert, near the saw mill of 
Fitch Bros. & Porter, has been rebuilt and enlarged in the most 
substantial manner. 

We recommend the rebuilding of the stone bridge, at " Bridge 
Pond." It is now too small to carry the water in heavy rains. 



The "pMill Bridge " is so much decayed that we deem it unsafe 
for the heavy travel over it. Before rebuilding, we recommend 
that the Town ascertain the cost and duration of an iron bridge, 
as compared with one of wood. Although the first cost will be 
greater, we think in the end, it will be economy to build of iron. 
There is serious danger that the " Mill River " will cut a chan- 
nel across the road east of the " Hill Bridge/' unless measures 
are taken to prevent further wearing of the bank in Mr. Hubbard's 
lot. 

The roads throughout the Town are generally in a bad condi- 
tion, and a largely increased appropriation will be necessary for 
their repair and maintenance the coming year. We believe it to 
be the true policy of the Town, to appropriate such annual 
sums as will allow of a more thorough system of repairs, than 
can be done with the usual appropriation. The total cost of the 
Highways and Bridges the past year, amounts to 84,392. 10. 

The expenses of keeping the town team during the year, are 
as follows :— For hay and straw, $252.09 ; meal, $198.58 ; total, 
$450.67. There is due the Town for earnings of the team the 
past winter, about $50.00. 

There has been an increased expense for support of Paupers 
the past year. Oliver Bardwell and Francis Abbott still remain 
at the hospitals in Brattleboro and Northampton. Asa Wells 
has been fully supported since last May. William Wells has also 
received full support nearly half of the year. They are both 
now, and probably will be, a charge upon the Town during life. 

In November last, we received notice from the Overseers of 
the Poor of the city of Lowell, that Mrs. Jane Baldwin, who 
claimed a legal settlement in this Town, was in destitute circum- 
stances, and in need of relief, which they had furnished, at the 
expense of this Town. Upon investigation, we were satisfied 
that the Town was legally liable, and therefore paid the bill pre-^ 
sented, amounting to $41.29. Martha Grillett, whose legal settle- 
ment is believed to be in the city of Salem, is now sick at Hor- 
ace Wait's, and provided for at the expense of the Town. Legal 
notice of this fact has been served upon that city, but no reply 
has been received. The agents appointed by this Town, have 
settled with the Town of Whately, for the support of Eunice 
Bardwell, paying $219.45. 



The Town Hall has been improved, by repairing and painting 
blinds, at a cost of 8225.00. 

The Public Library has been removed to the vestry, and has 
been enlarged by the addition of the " Smith Library," and 
about thirty new volumes purchased this year. Nearly one 
hundred families regularly avail themselves of its privileges. 
We think a liberal appropriation, by the Town, for its support, 
will be money well invested. 

The State Tax is not yet paid, owing partly to the difficulty 
the Collector has experienced in collecting taxes, and partly that 
the money has been used for other purposes. There is an action 
against the Town for damages received on the highways, brought 
by Philetus Averill of North Amherst, now pending before the 
courts. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 



EXPENDITURES 



Olcl J3ills. 

Paid A. D. Sweet, wood furnished, 828 00 

L. Ohaffin, cash paid for hay, 11 62 
Wm. H. Dickinson, services as Selectman, 55 00 

J. T. Fitch, " « 25 00 

R. H. Belden, " " 25 00 
T. Graves, services as School Committee, 

cash paid, 38 50 



Forward, $183 12 



Brought Forward, $183 12 

James Porter, services as School Com. 38 00 

R. H. Belden, " " " 35 00 

Miss Mary Kellogg, School Teacher, 6 00 
Town of Whately, cash, support of Eunice 

Bardwell, 219 45 

Fitch Bros. & Porter, meal furnished, 10 50 

J. T. & G. C. Fitch, wood furnished, 4 74 

Wells & Bardwell, books furnished, 5 00 
Inhabitants of Pantry, balance due on 

School House, 130 92 
Insane Asylum, Northampton, boarding 

F. Abbott, 98 99 



HigliAvays ancl 


Briclg'es. 






Paid Lewis Moran, 


for labor, 


$29 


25 




John Kiley, 


it 


tt 


28 


50 




0. N. Coleman, 


it 


tt 


501 


00 




E. Brainard, 


a 


tt 


12 


50 




J. A. Billings, 


it 


tt 


10 


00 




W. Boyle, 


it 


a 


14 


00 




Oliver Warner, 


it 


tt 


363 


38 




J. Day, 


tt 


tt 


6 


00 




0. D. Bardwell, 


it 


tt 


19 


00 




John McHugh, 


tt 


tt 


31 


Y5 




J. E. Waite, 


tt 


tt 


25 


00 




D. W. Wells, 


tt 


a 


1 


50 




P. Russell, 


it 


tt 


5 


00 




F. Dane, 


tt 


it 


4 


99 




W. P. Allis, 


tt 


tt 


20 


00 




J. D. Brown, 


tt 


it 


14 


00 




S. G. Hubbard, 


tt 


it 


5 


00 




J. Morton, 


tt 


tt 


2 50 




F. Carl, 


tt 


tt 


40 


50 




G. L. Marsh, 


tt 


tt 


22 


00 




D. P. Morton, 


ti 


tt 


13 


75 




L. Chaffin, 


tt 


tt 


118 


00 




Forward, 








_ — 


— . — _ 



$1,293 62 



Brought Forward, 
J. E. Porter, for labor, 

0. Childs, " " 

J. Carl & A. D. Sweet, '.« 
A. Allair, Jr., 
Wm. Hurley, 
P. Balise, 
A. Remiard, 
R. Fitzgerald, 
T. O'Hara, 
0. L. Graves, 
H. Wade, 

D. B. Curtiss, 

E. F. Cooley, 
Wm. Butler, 

D. Vining, 
0. C. Hosford, 
H. Waite, 
L. Cooley,| 

F. C. Anderson, 

E. Dickinson, 
D. Cooley, 
M. N. Hubbard, 
P. Merrick, 
L. Crafts, 
D. W. Allis, 
H. Anderson, 
C. S. Waite, 
H. Manchester, 

F. D. Billings, 
R. H. Belden, 
H. W.^Field, 
L. G. Curtiss, 
C. N.Coleman, cash paid for hay and 
Wm. Bancroft, for hay and straw, 
James Ryan, for earth, 

J. E. Wait, " 

W. Hurley, 



$1,293 62 



5 

- 7 

404 

62 

18 

7 

70 
27 

9 
51 
28 

6 

134 

11 

73 

1 

6 
90 

8 
43 
56 
20 

8 
51 

1 
11 
12 

2 
36 

8 

1 

3 

straw, 69 

182 

20 

1 

6 



00 

50 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

50 

50 

00 

75 

25 

50 

00 

00 

12 

50 

00 

00 

00 

00 

75 

00 

50 

50 

00 

50 

00 

00 

00 

50 

59 

50 

00 

75 



$2,944 83 



8 

Brought Forward, $2,944 83 

J. A. Cutter, for earth, 15 00 

F. Teru, " " 8 00 

L. Chaffin, " . •" 3 00 

A. Allair, « « 6 TO 

Charles Potter, for stone 10 00 

Fitch Bros. & Porter, 8185 lbs. meal, 190 58 

" " " lumber, 428 68 

J. T. & G. C. Fitch, " 324 73 

Fitch Bros. & Doane, Blacksmithing, 80 92 

S. W. Kingsley, " 58 61 
Batcheller & Dinsmore, labor on bridges, 13 50 

L. Mclntire, for tile, 219 14 

Conn. R. E. R., freight on tile, 24 5*7 

F. D. Billings, cash paid freight, 8 88 

E. A. Bardwell, mdz., 6 4*7 

C. N. Coleman, cash paid, 48 43 



$4,392 10 



Paupers. 



Paid F. D. Billings, expenses finding settlement 

of Paupers, $31 51 

F. D. Billings, cash paid for boarding Wm. 

and Asa Wells, 115 00 

Bement Wait, boarding Wm. & Asa Wells, 92 00 
French & Abbott, clothing, Wm. Wells, 12 70 
Merritt Clark & Co., clothing Asa Wells, 20 75 
P. Saffer, expenses for burying George 

Shindler, 15 00 

E. A. Bardwell, mdz. for paupers, 9 78 

Insane Asylum, Northampton, boarding F. 

Abbott, 95 05 

Fitch Bros. & Doane, mdz. furnished F. 

Ballau, 10 00 4 

S. M. Smith & Co., coffin and shroud for 

Geo. Shindler, 14 50 

A. M. Peck, for burying Geo. Shindler, 3 50 



Forward, $419 79 



9 

Brought Forward, $419179 

Treasurer of Lowell, for assistance to Jane 

Baldwin, 41 29 

A. Lewis, M. D., medical attendance J. 

Arratt, I. Lee, and Selah Wheeler, 48 00 
Wm. H. Dickinson, cash paid board Wm. 

Wells, 12 00 

Vermont Insane Asylum, support of 0. 

Bardwell, 130 00 

S. M. Smith & Co., coffin for Eliza 

Wheeler, 10 00 

E. Proulx, care of Mary Ryan's child, 15 00 

T. Cutter, keeping transient paupers, 5 00 

L. S. Bliss, " „" " 39 50 

R. H. Belden, care John Arratt, 10 00 

— $730 58 



Miscellaneous Expenses. 

Paid 0. E. Hubbard for 1 pair Horses, $500 00 

T. Porter, services as ferryman, and use 

of boat, 10 00 

B. Warner, services as ferryman, 17 00 

A. Allair, Jr., grading for school house, 20 00 
H. S. Portor, " " " 251 00 

L. & D. Cooley, land damages, 47 00 

Eames & Sprague, stoves and spouting for 

Town Hall, 72 36 

Batcheller & Dinsmore, repairs on Town 

Hall, blinds, etc., 92 98 

Wm. Daugherty, for painting blinds, and 

work on school houses, 82 00 

F. D. Billings, cash paid for glass for hall, 

pauper register, etc., 17 55 

J. L. Sikes, moving school house, repairs 

on town hall, 35 26 

Wm. B. Coleman, for ploughs and scraper, 45 00 



Forward, $1,190 15 

2 



10 



Brought Forward, 
L. Cooley, services as Assessor, 30 00 

H. P. Billings, " " and cash pd. 49 75 

0. L. Warner, " ». 32 50 

J. S. Wells, " as Treasurer, 26 50 

L. Mclntire, tile for school house, 29 52 

H. Waite, repairs on school house, West 

Brook, 19 24 

L. Crafts, repairs on school house, West 

Brook, 11 25 

A. M. Peck, work on cemeteries and re- 
cording deaths, 9 40 
Trumbull & Gere, for printing report and 

town orders, 45 00 

T. Graves, cash paid for stove for school 

house, 12 06 

W. D. Billings, services as Town Clerk, 

recording births, 39 25 

G. W. Dickinson, collecting taxes, post- 
ing warrants, and cash, 86 60 
James Porter, repairs on school house, 40 25 
Mrs. S. F. Knight, cash paid repairs on 

school house, 13 75 

E. A. Bardwell, mdz. for school houses, 1 17 



$1,190 15 



$1,636 39 



Schools. 



aid J. E. Miller, services as teacher, 


$112 50 


-R. L. Bridgman, 


tt t 




280 00 


Miss Emma Dawes, 


a t 




30 00 


Miss M. J. Strong, 


< t 




184 00 


Miss Mary W. Kellogg, 


t i 




88 00 


Miss Lizzie A. Smith, ' 


i t 




1?0 00 


Miss Nellie Dayton, 


n t 




102 00 


Miss Emma Rhood, 


<t t 




36 00 


Miss Nellie M. Stearns, 


u t 




42 00 


Miss S. G. Peckham, 


It t 




72 00 



Forward, 



$1,116 50 



11 



Brought Forward, 
Paid Mrs. N. T. Abells, services as teacher, 264 00 

Miss Mary Moffat, " " 30 00 

Miss Mary 0. Billings, " " 96 00 

Miss Nellie Miles, " " 48.00 

Miss Clara Kingsley, " " 42 00 

Wm. Daugherty, boarding teacher, 53 25 

H. Waite, " " 48 00 

0. E. Hubbard, " " 272 00 

0. Belden, " " 48 00 

Mrs. Alice Bardwell, " " 62 00 

S. G. Hubbard, " " 72 00 

0. 0. Hosford, " " 40 00 

1. Morton, " " 40 00 
O. S. Graves, " " 36 00 
0. A. Jones, " " 48 00- 
MrsJS. F. Knight, " " 48 00 
E. A. Bardwell, mdz. furnished schools, 14 59 
P. Doane, sawing wood, 16 50 
J. Porter, coal and crayons furnished^ 70 57 
H. Waite, wood furnished, 15 00 
Fitch Bros. & Porter, wood furnished, 74 75 
R. H. Belden, wood furnished, 23 25 



$1,116 50 



State Aid. 




Paid Mrs. Mary Richards, 


896 00 


Mrs. Ruth S. Dennis, 


96 00 


Mrs. Ursula B. Graves, 


96 00 


Mrs. E. C. Anderson, 


96 00 


Mrs. Clara Vining, 


96 00 


E. L. Covill, 


18 00 


Town Aid. 




Paid Mrs. Ursula B. Graves, 


$91 m 


Mrs. Clara Vining, 


42 00 


Mrs. Helen M. Waite, 


31 67 


Mrs. Lucy Field, 


62 00 



$2,578 41 



$498 00 



$227 33 



12 



School House. 



Paid A. Allair, Jr., drawing stone, $190 75 

L. Chaffin, laying foundation, 50 00 

A. Allair, brick furnished, 988 75 

L. J. Macomber, laying brick and plas- 
tering, 900 00 
H. S.Porter, cash paid for stone andlabor, 216 50 
L. Mclntire, for hair and lime, 76 78 
H. S. Porter, cash paid A. M. Rich- 
mond and others, 3,077 22 



5,500 00 



IPxilblio H<it>x-ary. 

Paid H. P. Billings, cash paid for cases, $28 23 

H. P. Billings, " " rebinding books, 5 50 
H. P. Billings, " " books, 38 27 

Trumbull & G-ere, printing catalogues 

and labels, 28 00 



$100 00 



Out standing' Debts. 

Selectmen's Note to Osmyn Baker, $1,500 00 

State Tax, 3,550 00 

$5,050 00 

Due tire Town. 

From the State on account of State Aid, $498 00 
« • " " of Corporation Tax, 170 20 

$668 20 



EECAPITULATION. 

Kecelpts. 

Balance in Treasurer's and Collector's hands, March 

22, 1869, $1,188 30 

Amount Taxes Assessed, 16,948 48 

A. Allair, Jr., in Payment for Horse, 38 00 

Forward, $18,174 78 



13 



Brought forward, 


$18,174 78 


H. S. Gere, Dog Fund, 


5 02 


Samuel H. Dickinson, Money Borrowed, 


300 00 


Osmyn Baker, " " 


1,500 00 


H. S. Porter, in Payment for School House, 


250 00 




820,229 80 


Expenclitur es . 




County Tax, 


$1,618 05 


Samuel H. Dickinson's Note and Interest, 


301 50 


Old Bills, 


731 72 


Highways and Bridges, 


4,392 10 


Paupers, 


730 58 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


1,636 39 


Schools, 


. 2,578 41 


State Aid, 


498 00 


Town Aid, 


227 33 


Public Library, 


100 00 


Assessors' Order of Abatement, 


114 85 


School House, 


5,500 00 



818,428 93 
Balance in hands of Collector and Treasurer, Mc'h 22, 1,800 87 





$20,229 80 


F. D. BILLINGS, 


} Selectmen 


L. G. CURTIS, 


I of 


H. W. FIELD, 


) Hatfield. 


J. S. WELLS, Treasurer. 




Hatfield, March 22d, 1870. 





ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending April, 1870. 



Another year passed under the new state of things involved 
by the abolition of the District system, tends strongly to con- 
vince your Committee that our Legislature have acted wisely 
in this regard. Change is likely to involve confusion in minor 
details, and it is not surprising that Committees called to the 
unusual duties of attending to the minutest wants of numer- 
ous Schools, widely separated, at one and the same moment, 
should have been slow to have discovered the advantages of 
the change. But we think that experience will show that any 
judicious effort to disburse the gifts of education with an equal 
as well as open hand, must be conducive of more good than 
evil. .No variation in length of terms is now experienced, as 
formerly, in different portions of the Town. All the Schools 
have continued for thirty-four weeks each. 



16 

Your Committee have expended for the various Schools as 

follows : — 

For High School, - - - $405 00 

Hill, --.:- - - - - 544 00 

Center, - - - - 544 00 

North Hatfield, . . ' - - - 355 50 

West Brook, - 250 00 

West Hatfield, - - - - - 256 00 

Sixteen different teachers have been employed during the 

year, four of whom have continued during the entire three 

terms. 

The whole attendance during the Summer was 306 ; Fall, 

310 ; Winter 346. The average attendance in Summer, 282; 

Fall, 225 ; Winter, 272. 
No. of scholars between 5 and 15 years of age in Hatfield, 294. 

HIGH SCHOOL, 

This School was conducted during the Summer by Miss L. 
Gr. Peckham of Providence, during the Fall and Winter by 
R. L. Bridgman of Amherst College, both of whom, we are 
convinced, labored with their best energies to advance the 
interests of the School. The building in which this School 
has been placed by the Town affords a decided obstacle to 
the attainment of the highest results by either Teacher or 
Pupils. The amount expended for fuel to heat this unneces- 
sarily large room for the winter term of twelve weeks, falls 
but a little short of one hundred dollars, and even then the 
scholars are not ordinarily comfortable. This, together with 
the numerous annoyances and inconveniences arising from the 
occupancy of so public a building, induce your Committee to 
suggest to the Town the propriety of furnishing at an early 
day, accommodations for this School, either temporary or per- 
manent, that shall better comport with the character of the 
Town and the wants of the School. Your Committee have 
felt here during the past year, as they have before felt, a slight 
want of parental support ; which support, desirable at all 



17 

times, is doubly necessary in a School so recently established 
and confessedly an experiment. 

The other Schools of the Town have been conducted during 
the year by able and efficient Teachers, who have, as a whole, 
labored faithfully and with more than usual success to promote 
the education of the young. Beading and spelling, those 
homely branehes which had fallen sadly into disrepute in 
these later days, have seemed, in quite a number of our Schools, 
to revive within the past year, and bid fair in time to receive 
again their just proportion of attention. The aim of the 
Common School is to lay a firm foundation, upon the solidity 
of which depends the character of the structure subsequently 
built. In the Common School, mere gloss and elegancies 
should give place to the solid materials of education. In 
what was formerly District No. 1, the Town have with note- 
worthy liberality erected within the past year, a commodious 
and elegant School building, ample for the wants of the School 
and meeting in every respect the wishes of its advocates. 
From trial we are convinced that this is a step in the right 
direction, and trust that the Town will in its discretion erect 
suitable buildings in other portions of the Town where such 
improvements are needed. 

JAMES PORTER, ) School Committee 

MRS. FANNY KNIGHT, \ of: the 

THADDEUS GRAVES, ) Town of Hatfield. 



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REPORTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



of HattlelA 



For the Year 1870-71, 



NORTHAMPTON : 

TRUMBULL & GERE, STEAM PRINTERS. 

1871. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

Your Board of Selectmen herewith present a statement of their 
doings, and also an account of the Receipts and Expenditures of 
the Town for the past year. 

It will be seen upon referring to the account of expenses for 
Highways and Bridges, that it largely exceeds that of the pre- 
vious year. This is owing partly to the very bad condition of 
the same at the commencement of the year, and partly to the 
increased expense in the manner of rebuilding Bridges, adopted 
by the Selectmen. Upon examination of the Roads and Bridges 
we found them in a worse condition than we expected. Quite a 
number of Culverts and small Bridges had fallen in, owing to the 
sluiceways being too small, and needed rebuilding. There were 
also two large Bridges at West Brook, that required rebuilding. 
Upon consultation, we, (acting upon the principle "that work 
well done is twice done,") decided to rebuild and enlarge the 
Bridges at West Brook, laying the abutments and pier of heavy 
stone in cement. The work was done by Mr. Ohaffin, in such a 
manner that we believe that it will be many years before they 
will need repairing. We have also rebuilt a number of smaller 
Bridges, in all cases laying the abutments of stone, and when 
not too wide, covering them with the same. We have rebuilt and 
enlarged the stone Culvert at "Bridge Pond/' in accordance 
with our recommendation of last year. 

The Mill Bridge was repaired by the Committee chosen for the 
purpose, so that, in their opinion, it is safe for the present. We 
believe that the Hill Bridge is also safe for another year. It 



4 

probably will be necessary to rebuild two of the Bridges south of 
the house of Henry R. Graves ; also to rebuild or repair two at 
"Middle Going Over " We have covered, according to the vote 
of the Town, four Bridges at West Brook, at a cost of $40 each, 
but were unable to procure lumber for more until too late in the 
season. During the Summer we received numerous complaints 
of the condition of the road leading from the upper part of the 
Hill to Northampton. Owing to the long season of dry weather, 
the road had become so worn that the public travel was seriously 
^peded. After consulting with various persons, and much de- 
liberation, we decided that the public interests required that the 
road should be repaired, which was accordingly done at an ex- 
pense of about $900. We have also erected new Guide Boards 
at all needed points throughout the Town. 

The expense for keeping the town team has been as follows :— 
Hay and straw, $152.31; meal, $197; total, $349.87. 

At the close of the season for work on Highways, it was thought 
advisable to sell the horses rather than be at the expense of keep- 
ing them through the winter. They were sold, together with the 
harness, to Mr. Edwin Harris, for the sum of $500, he giving his 
note for the same, payable April 1st. 

The total expense for Highways and Bridges the past year has 
been $5,920.10. 

The Pauper account shows a slightly diminished expense from 
that of last year. 

Francis Abbott and Oliver Bardwell still remain at the Hospi- 
tals at Northampton and Brattleboro. Wm. and Rolla Wells are 
and probably will be an expense to the Town for the ensuing 
year. We have received from the city of Salem, the sum of 
$92.50, for the support of Martha Gillette, whose legal settlement 
was in that city, which sum and $13.29, received from Benj>. 
Laundry for assistance rendered, deducted from the amount ex- 
pended for Paupers, leaves the sum of $786.33 as the actual ex- 
pense for Paupers the past year. 

The suit of Philetus Averill against the Town, for damage sus- 
tained on the highway, which was pending at the time of our 
last report, has since been settled by a verdict against the Town 
of $60, and cost of court, which sum, with our own counsel fees 
and cost, amount to $489.85, which has been paid. 



;5 

At a special meeting, called for the purpose, the Town voted 
to build new School Houses for the Center and West Brook, ap- 
propriating $7,000 for the former, and $3,000 for the latter, which 
last appropriation has been paid, together with $1,230 from the 
former appropriation, leaving a balance in the Treasury for the 
Center School House, of $5,770. 

The Town appropriated $250 for the purpose of repairing the 
old Burial Ground. This has been done by leveling and re-seed- 
ing the grounds, re- setting the stones and repairing the fence, at 
an expense of $223.25. If it is designed to surround the whole 
or any part of the grounds with a hedge, we think now is the 
proper time for it to be done, as the present fence will be a suffi- 
cient protection to the hedge until grown. 

Fifty dollars was also appropriated for the improvement of the 
Burial Ground at West Hatfield. Of this sum, $14.62 has been 
expended, which, by mistake, has been charged to account of 
Highways. 

There is now due on account of Public Library, the sum of $50 
in addition to $211.25 paid. 

We have made a settlement with the Treasurer, and find that 
there remains in the Treasury, after paying all outstanding or- 
ders to date of this report, $912.8 7. 

We have also examined the Collector's account, and find that 
the amount of taxes still uncollected is $6,119.83, making the 
total amount in the hands of the Treasurer and Collector, $7,032.- 
70. It will require, in addition to the above sum, to make good 
the appropriations for the past year, and pay Note and interest 
of L. G. Curtis to date, $897.30. There are also outstanding bills 
to the amount of $100. We recommend that the Town appropri" 
ate the sum of $J,000 for the payment of said Note and bills. 



6 

EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BII/L.S. 

Paid Wm. Lyons, labor on highways, $5 00 

S. M. Smith & Co., chairs and settees for 

School House, 59 89 

F. G. Bardwell, wood, School West Farms, 8 12 
Thaddeus Graves, labor moving Hill 

School House, 6 00 

H. S. Porter, account Hill School House, 500 00 

F. D. Billings, services as Selectman, 105 00 

• L. G. Curtis, 

H. W. Field, 

Thaddeus Graves, services as School Com. 
Jas. Porter, 
Mrs. S. F. Knight, " 
Expenses Com. to Boston, Jan., 18*70, 



35 


00 


25 


00 


i. 39 


63 


37 


00 


17 


25 


100 


00 



$937 89 



HIGHWAYS A1STD BRIDGES. 

Paid John Laird, $10 50 

Eichard Orman, 65 50 

John McHugh, 69 00 

Lewis Moran, 12 00 

Jerry Stone, 4 00 

Moses Remiard, 222 67 

Augustus Remiard, 204 50 

John E. Waite, 3 50 

John E. Waite, earth, 7 30 

Patrick Merrick, 30 00 

Lorens Seitz, 4 50 

Chas. N. Coleman, 588 25 

Chas. N. Coleman, cash paid for sundries, 37 30 

F. D. Billings, " " " labor, 37 00 

Wm. Bancroft, hay, 7675 lbs., 107 75 

Joseph Stoddard, 3 50 



Forward, $1,407 27 



Brought Forward, 


$1,407 2T 


id Wm. B. Coleman, hay, 2244 lbs., 




straw, 2382 lbs., 


41 62 


Alonzo Sweet, 


286 50 


John La Mountain, 


54 50 


Lysander Chaffin, 


972 63 


Seth W. Kingsley, bolts for bridge, 


7 00 


H. Gray & Sons, cement, 


6? 50 


Anthony Allair, Jr., 


27 50 


Conn. River R. R., 


10 36 


Patrick Boyle, labor $6, earth $5, 


11 00 


Jacob Carl, 


192 75 


L. Mclntire, tile $186 80, cement $6, 


192 80 


Fred. Carl, 


128 00 


Chas. D. Bartlett, 


43 00 


Joseph Capistraw, 


19 50 


Joseph Proulx, 


24 00 


F. D. Billings, 


61 00 


Peter Pecure, 


69 50 


Paul La Mountain, 


26 00 


Joseph, 


37 00 


James A. Cutter, for earth, 


15 00 


James Porter, 


14 00 


E. F. Cooley, 


85 00 


Edward Graves, 


20 00 


Henry Zondler, 


14 00 


Daniel A. Vining, 


69 50 


Francis Frary, 


12 00 


Charles Frary, 


6 00 


Alfred Cleval, 


16 50 


Leander Cooley, 


42 00 


Lysander Cooley, 


8 00 


Herrick Anderson, 


168 25 


Philip Carl, 


152 00 


Charles L. Graves, 


5 00 


John Goodchild, 


7 50 


Mrs. Buckley, 


2 50 



Forward, $4,322 68 



Brought Forward, $4,322 68 



Paid Geo. W. Smith, making guide boards, 
Henry Manchester, 
M. N. Hubbard, 


7 16 
21 00 
42 60 




Wm. Daugherty, painting guide boards, 
F. D. Billings, cash paid for lumber and 
tile 


49 00 
12 00 




Moses C. Porter, repairs on Mill Bridge, 

Henry R. Graves, 

Fitch Bros. & Porter, meal, 8600 lbs., 


1 60 

11 00 

197 00 




Fitch Bros. & Porter, lumber, 


252 99 




Anthony Allair, Jr., earth, 
J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber, 


42 80 
383 39 




Fitch Bros. & Doane, mdse., 


9 43 




Fitch BrOs. & Doane, blacksmith's bill, 


56 75 




D wight S. Strong, 
Elisha Hubbard, 


14 62 

77 00 




Edward Proulx, 


21 00 




James Finland, 


2 00 




L. S. Crafts, labor $35, earth $10, 
Oliver Goodchild, 


45 00 
11 50 




D. P. Morton, 


15 00 




A. M. Peck, 


5 10 




E. A. Bard well, mdse., 


11 76 




Ohas. K. Morton, 


73 50 




S G. Hubbard, lumber, 


118 39 




Peter Saffer, 


47 00 




L. G. Curtis, nails, 


24 




Horace Shumway, 
D. W. Wells, 


17 50 
3 50 




J. T. & G. 0. Fitch, balance lumber bill, 


18 29 




J. D. Brown, 


2 50 




F. D. Billings, 
H. A. Wade, 

STATE AID. 


5 00 
16 00 

$5,920 


10 


Paid Mrs. Mary Richards, 
Mrs. Clara W. Vining, 


$40 00 

96 00 





Forward, • $136 00 



Brought Forward, 


$136 00 


Paid Mrs. E. 0. Anderson, 


96 00 


Mrs. Ruth S. Dennis, 


96 00 


Mrs. U. B. Graves, 


96 00 


E. L. Covill, 


18 00 


TOWN AID. 




Paid Mrs. Helen M. Waite, 


$36 01 


Mrs. Clara W. Vming, 


32 66 


Mrs. U. B. Graves, 


86 6f 


Mrs. Lucy Field, 


33 34 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Paid H. P. Billings, cash paid for Books, $ i 94 25 

Batcheller & Dinsmore, 4 50. 

D. M. Rice, for Books, 12 50 

PAUPERS. 
Paid Hospital for Insane, Northampton, board 

of Frauds Abbott, $192 81 

J. B. Wait, boardhig VVm. & Asa Wells, 180 00 
Horace Wait, boarding Martha Gillette, 78 00 
Assistance rendered B. Laundry, 
S. M, Smith & Co., Coffins, 
Dr. M. Harwood 3 attendance A. Wells, 
F. D. Billings, cash paid for boots for R. 

Wells, 
Fitch Bros. & Porter, wood, 
Fitch Bros. & Doane, mdse for Dennis Dowd, 8 58 
Cash paid assistance Mrs. Rhoades, 3 00 

Dr. A. Lewis, medical attendance and 

services, 39 50 

E. A. Bardwell, mdse., 11 82 
L. S. Bliss, keeping transient paupers, 41 50 
L. G. Curtis, cash paid, 10 62 
A. M. Peck, burial paupers, 1 00 



15 


50 


42 


50 


13 


50 


4 50 


3 


50 



$442 00 



8188 68 



II 25 



Forward, $652 33 

2 



10 

Brought Forward, $652 33 

Paid Benj. Laundry, mdse., $ 2 19 

Hospital for Insane, Brattleboro, Yt., 

board of Oliver Bard well, 130 00 

B. Wait, board Wm. and R. Wells, 112 00 



$89*1 12 



Rec'd from city of Salem, sup. Martha Gillette, $92 50 
Rec'd from Benj. Laundry, assistance rend. 18 29 



$110 19 
Appropriation, 800 00 $910 19 

SCHOOL HOUSE, -WEST BROOK. 
Paid 0. C. & C. B. Dickinson, site for school 

house, $140 00 

Cash paid Horace Waite, Chairman build- 
ing committee, 2,218 00 
Anthony Allair, Jr., brick, 642 00 

- — -83,000 00 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 
Paid A. M. Peck, labor, burial ground, $23 50 

Peck & Pierce, ins. on Hill School House 

and Town Hall, 152 00 

L. P. Dole, labor on Hill School House, 21 60 
Mrs. S. P. Knight, cash paid repairs on 

school house, 14 25 

Seth W. Kingsley, for Harrow, 5 00 

Harvey Kirkiand, Ins. on Town Hall, 45 50 

James Porter, grading at Hill School 

House, 25 00 

John McHugh, labor on old burying ground 45 00 



Michael Boyle, 


" 43 00 


John O'Neil, 


" 20 00 


Stephen S. Squires " 


" 48 00 


Charles Frary, " " " 


" 52 00 


Fitch Bros, & Porter, posts, old" 


" 10 00 


P. D. Billings, grass seed and nails 


old 


burying ground, 


1 25 






Forward, $518 10 



11 

Brought Forward, $518 10 

Leander Oooley, services as Assessor, 42 50 

H. P. Billings, " " 53 63 

Charles L. Warner, " " 40 00 

Mrs. S. F. Knight, cash paid for cleaning 

school houses, 6 00 

Expenses contesting will of Sophia Smith, 54*7 18 
Wm. Daugherty, repairs on school house, 10 50 
F. D. Billings, cash paid for advertising, 3 25 
Geo. W. Hubbard, Note and Interest Os- 

myn Baker, 1,630 80 

F. D. Billings, cash paid Delano & Ham- 
mond, damages and cost, P„ Averill, 270 00 
F. D. Billings, cash paid Delano & Ham- 
mond, legal advice, serv, as counsel, 124 85 
F.D.Billings, cash paid witnesses, case 

Philetus Averill, 95 00 ' 

F. D. Billings, cash paid E. H. Fitts, dam- 
age received on highway, 30 00 
Trumbull & G-ere, printing reports, &c, 41 50 
Fitch Bros. & Doane, mdse. Hill school 

house, 5 36 

Mrs. S. F. Knight, cash paid repairs school 

house. 5 50 

O. Marsh, cash paid repairs school house, 4 00 
Lysander Ohaffin, erecting boundary stones, 4 00 
A. M. Peck, labor on old Burial Ground, ' 7 00 
A M. Peck, returning deaths, 4 

E. A. Bardwell, mdse. school houses, 7 60 

S. G. Hubbard, surveying, 8 00 

Thaddeus Graves, serv as School Com., 

and cash paid 1870 and J 871, 78 50 

W. D. Billings, serv. as Clerk, recording 

births, deaths and marriages, cash p'd, 43 70 
Horace Shumway, horse hire, 6 50 

J. D. Brown, repairs school house, 2 25 

E. A. Bardwell, services as Treasurer and 

cash paid, 27 00 



Forward, $3,615 72 



12 



Brought Forward, 
Paid R. H. Belden, cash paid for stove, 
repairs school house, &c, 
F. D Billings, cash paid, 



$3,615 72 

50 15 

8 47 



-$3,674 34 



SCHOOLS. 

Paid Miss M. W. Kellogg, teaching, $66 00 

" Nellie M. Dayton, " 73 50 

" Mary C Billings, " and board, 272 00 

" Miss Isabella L. Parsons, teaching, 81 20 

" Nancy Marble, " 95 00 

" Delia Nims, " 69 00 

" Mary J. Strong, teaching and board 274 00 



" Minnie Strong, " 


60 00 


", Lucy Sanderson, " 


50 00 


" Clara Morton, " 


and board, 70 00 


Mrs. W. I. Bishop, 


88 00 


Miss M. E. Cook, 


48 00 


" Etta Strong, 


72 00 


" Phelps, 


38 70 


" Rosa Miller, 


36 00 


Mrs. S. F. Knight, board, 


134 00 


Chas. A. Jones, " 


48 00 


Chas. E. Hubbard, " 


114 00 


Thaddeus Graves, " 


3 00 


Mrs. M. J. Montville, board, 


40 00 


Chas. Rhoades, '■' 


35 00 


Wm Daugherty, " 


48 00 


Mrs. M. E. Miller, 


88 00 


M. C. Porter, 


48 00 


Philos Doane, sawing wood, 


27 25 


P. L. Strong & Son, wood, 


55 76 


Horace Waite, " 


17 00 


Fitch Bros. & Porter, " 


63 00 


J. T. & G. 0. Fitch, " 


10 38 


Chas. E. Hubbard, 


12 00 



Forward, 



$2,136 79 



13 



Brought Forward, 


$2,136 7S 




Paid F. D. Billings, coal and wood, 


IS 00 




Fitch Bros. & Doane, crayons, 


1 75 




Miss Clara Kingsley, teaching, 


119 00 




Mr. Butler, 


60 00 




Oscar Belden, board, 


90 50 




Henry G. Moore, board, 


40 00 




R. H. Belden, wood and coal, 


49 00 


$2,575 04 


CENTER SCHOOL 


HOUSE. 


Paid Lysander Chaffin, for stone, 


$100 00 




Drawing stone, 


130 00 




J. D. Billings for site, 


1,000 00 


$1,230 00 



OUTSTANDING DEBTS. 

Selectmen and Treasurer's note and interest to L. G. 

Curtis, March 8th, $2,160 00 

DUE THE TOWN. 
From Edwin Harris, April 1, for horses and harness, $500 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

REDEIPTS. 

Balance in hands of Collector and Treasurer, March 

22,1870, $1,800 8t 

Borrowed from L. G. Curtis, 2,500 00 

" Wm. H. Dickinson, 1,200 00 



Forward $5,500 87 



14 



Brought Forward $5,500 87 

Received from State Treas., State Aid, 1868, 498 00 

" " " " Corporation Tax, 1869, 231 20 

" Mass. School Fund, 148 10 

" " City of Salem, support of Martha Gillett, 92 50 

" " Chas. N. Coleman, use town team, 51 00 

" " " Hay, 5 00 

Received from Town of Northampton, one-half damages 

paid E. H. Fitts, 15 00 

Received from Town of Northampton, one-half expense 

boundary stone, 
Received from State Treas., State Aid, 1869, 

Corporation Tax, 1870, 
" " " " Mass. School Fund, 

" " Sale earth, old burying ground, 
" " Benj. Laundry, for assistance rendered, 
" Rent Town Hall, 
Amount Taxes Assessed, 

Received from Harvey Kirkland, dividend on ins. pol. 
" " County Treasurer, Dog Licenses, 



EXPENDITURES. ' 
State Tax and Interest, 1869, 

a a u n i%>iQ ) 

County Tax, 18T0, 

Win H. Dickinson's Note and Interest, 

L. Gr. Curtis, on Note, 

Amount refunded to Florence Sewing Machine Co 

on account State, 
State Aid, 
Town Aid, 
Old Bills, 
Paupers, 
Public Library, 
Miscellaneous Expenses, 
Highways and Bridges, 



Forward, 



2 


00 


498 


00 


23! 


72 


182 


18 


50 


00 


18 


29 


6 


00 


30,206 


41 


18 


20 


87 


24 


$37,841 


71 


$3,664 71 


3,606 


54 


2,135 


82 


1,257 


36 


500 


00 


44 


28 


442 


00 


188 


68 


937 


89 


897 


12 


211 


25 


3,674 


34 


5,920 


10 


$23,480 


09 



15 



Brought Forward, 


$23,480 09 


Schools, 


2,575 04 


School House, West Brook, 


3,000 00 


Center, ' 


1,230 00 


S. H. Dickinson's Note and Interest, 


473 88 


Assessor's Order of Abatement, 


50 00 




$30,809 01 


Balance in hands of Collector and Treasurer March 8 


, 7,032 70 




$37,841 71 



F. D. BILLINGS, 1 Selectmen 
L. G. CURTIS, [ of 

H. W. FIELD, Hatfield. 

E. A. BARDWELL, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 8, 1871. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

©f tie Town of B^nrnBiiD* 

For the Year 1870-71. 



The School Committee, in presenting their annual report 
of the condition of the several Public Schools are glad to be 
able to report generally, a good degree of prosperity for the 
past year, in all our Schools. The Teachers, for the most part, 
have been capable, faithful and diligent, and, though many 
obstacles still exist, have been able, not only to maintain the 
standing of former years, but have made some advancement 
and improvement, though the present age would seem to de- 
mand still more. 

One great evil from which we suffer in all our Schools, is 
irregularity in attendance, which is not only a serious detri- 
ment to the absent pupil, who should by punctuality and dili- 
gence during the school session, strive to attain the highest 
possible rank, but an interruption of the various classes where 
such absenteeisms occur, thus materially affecting the prop ress 
3 



of the entire School. We would therefore earnestly ask pa- 
rents and guardians toco-operate with the teachers, in securing 
regular and punctual attendance, so far as possible, thus by 
individual effort, promoting the general good, by the attain- 
ment of a higher standard of scholarship throughout the 
Town. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL, 

With Miss Delia Nims, teacher during the summer term, 
though still unfavorably located, was eminently successful. 
Miss Essie Strong, teacher during the fall and winter, also 
labored to advance the interests of the School. 

When one great obstacle to its advancement shall have been 
removed, by the erection of a more spacious and commodious 
school building, we trust that what was commenced as an ex- 
periment, may result in the permanent establishment ot a 
High School, second to none in New England. 

THE HILL GRAMMAR SCHOOL, 

Taught by Miss Mary Kellogg, summer term ; J.<> Lizzie 
Sanderson, fall term. The winter term was commenced by 
Miss Nancy Marble, who being soon removed by illness and 
subsequent death, her place was filled by Miss Hattie A. 
Phelps, for a short term. 

The Primary department, in charge of Miss Nellie Dayton, 
summer and tall terms; Miss Rosalie Miller, winter term. 

SOUTH CENTER. 

This School has been conducted by Miss Mary C. Billings, 
an experienced and successful teacher, during the entire year. 

NORTH CENTER. 
This School has been much improved under the faithful and 
efficient care of Miss' Nancy Marble, during the summer and 
fall, succeeded by Miss Sue M. Cooke for the winter term. 

WEST HATFIELD. 

Miss Belle M. Parsons, teacher, summer term ; Miss Clara 
Morton, fall ; Mrs. Mary A. Bishop, winter. The progress 
has been good, and the School, as a whole, successful. 



19 

NORTH HATFIELD, 

With Miss Clara A. Kingsley, teacher during the year, this 
School has made a good degree of improvement. The more 
advanced pupils during the winter, were in charge of S. P. 
Butler of Amherst College. 

WEST BROOK, 
Has also been fortunate in securing an able and experienced 
teacher, Miss M. J Strong, who has, by continued effort, ad- 
vanced the interests of the School. With a new school build- 
ing, much is to be hoped for in the future. 

THADDEUS GRAVES, ) School Committee 

S. F. M. KNIGHT, \ of the 

R. H. BELDEN, ) Town of Hatfield. 

Amount expended for teaching the several Schools, as fol- 
lows : — 

High School, - - - - - . $340 00 

Hill, Grammar, - - - - - - 272 00 

Hill, Primary, - - - - - - - 247 50 

Center, South, ------- 272 00 

Center, North, - - - - - - -272 00 

West Hatfield, - - - - - - - 247 50 

North Hatfield, - - - - - - - 355 00 

West Brook, - - - - - - - 272 00 



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REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



FOR THE YEAR 1871-2, 



NORTHAMPTON : 
TRUMBULL & GERE, STEAM PRINTERS. 

1872. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 



The Selectmen herewith present to the inhabitants of the 
town, the following statement of facts, and the amount of expen- 
ses for the past year. 

According to the vote of the Town at the last annual meeting, 
the ordinary repairs of Highways have been done under the di- 
rection of Surveyors, chosen by the Town, by a labor tax. We 
find upon an examination of the accounts of such of the Survey- 
ors as have presented their bills to us, that they have either col- 
lected in money or caused to be worked in a satisfactory manner, 
the amount of tax bills as assigned them by the Assessors. We 
have rebuilt one bridge south of Henry K. Graves, and had made 
some preparation for rebuilding one at " Middle Going Over/' 
but were prevented from completing it by the early commence- 
ment of winter. It will be necessary the coming season to finish 
that one, and also to rebuild the one near the house of N. E. 
Strong, Owing to a change in the manner of raising money for 
the repairs of Highways, it will be necessary for the town to 
adopt some other method, than the one pursued last year. 

We have to report an increase of expense in our Pauper ac- 
count. Rolla Wells has been wholly supported the past year, 
and we have also been called upon for temporary relief more 
than in former years. The Town voted that under certain con- 
ditions, they would purchase five of the New England Fire Ex- 



tinguishers, appropriating for that purpose $4,000, and appointed 
the Selectmen a Committee to procure the same. Although the 
above conditions were not wholly complied with, we, acting as 
we believe for the best interests of the Town, have purchased 
two at an expense of Sixteen (SI, 600) Hundred Dollars. 

A portion of the money appropriated for the above, has been 
used for the payment of other debts ; the balance still stands to 
the credit of the Town, in the hands of the Collector. 

The old School House at West Brook has been sold, and in 
compliance with the vote of the Town, the proceeds were paid 
over to the building committee of the new House in that Dis- 
trict. The Burial Ground at West Brook, and the fence around 
the same, has been repaired, at an expense of Seventy Five ($75) 
dollars. We have also contracted for, to be delivered in the 
spring, a sufficient supply of Evergreen Trees, to enclose the 
West and North sides of the Old Burial Ground on the Hill. 

The matter of repairing the Town Hall, together with one or 
two minor matters, have, owing to circumstances, been delayed, 
but we think that they should be attended to by our successors 
in office. 

By special vote the Treasurer was instructed to borrow a suf- 
ficient sum of money, to pay the balance of the State tax, above 
what should be allowed us as credit from the State. Also a sum 
not exceeding Twenty One Hundred ($2,100) Dollars, for the 
building of the new School House. For these purposes he has 
borrowed for State Tax, Nine Hundred ($900) Dollars, and for the 
School House One Thousand ($1,000) Dollars. 

Owing to the " general scarcity " of money, the Collector has 
found himself unable, without resorting to extreme measures, 
to collect the taxes as fast as they were needed. For this reason 
there are outstanding orders, still unpaid, to the amount of 
Fourteen Hundred, ($1,400) Dollars, as well as the County Tax, 
$2,329.99. We think that the Town should take measures to 
provide for the immediate payment of the above. We find upon 
examination of the Collector's account, that there still remains 



to be collected, the sum of $5,922.66, which amount, after pay- 
ing all the outstanding debts, except the two Notes given by the 
Treasurer, ($1,900,) leave a balance of 81,682.28. 

Appended to the Reports of the Selectmen and School Com- 
mittee, will be found some statements by the Trustees of the 
Smith Academy, to the Inhabitants of the Town. 

The foregoing statements and accompanying figures, are re- 
spectfully submitted to the voters and tax payers of the Town of 
Hatfield. 



F. D. BILLINGS, 


) Selectmen 


H. W. FIELD, 


r of 


J. D. PORTER, ' 


) Hatfield. 



Hatfield, March 8, 1872. 



6 
EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BILLS. 

Paid E. W. Field, labor on highways, and assistance 

rendered Paupers, $7 ?2 

0. Marsh, labor on highways, It 00 

Dennis Gooley, labor on highways, 35 00 

John E. Waite, " " " and earth, 9 00 

Edward Dickinson, " " " 10 50 

George Moore, « " " 35 00 

James A. Cutter, " " " 22 00 

N. T. Abells, tile, 5 75 

Chas. Potter, " 11 00 

Chas. Potter, stone for bridges, 10 00 

Eames & Sprague, fixtures for Hill School House, 34 95 
F. D. Billings, services as Selectman, 150 00 

H. W. Field, " " " 45 00 

L. G. Curtis, " " " 60 00 
Metcalf & Co., printing Catalogues for public library, 33 00 

Lewis C. Wade, repairs on School House, 3 00 

Mrs. Sarah F. Knight, services as School Com., 36 00 

E. F. Billings, services as Librarian and cash paid, 25 00 



$549 92 

HiaHWAYS AND BRIDGES, 

Paid L. Mclntire, for tile, 

Hartwell & Prindle, tile, 

John E. Waite, earth, 

Lysander Chaffin, building bridge West Brook, 

Lysander Chaffin, work on Hill Bridge, 

L. C. Wade, . " " " 

Henry S. Hubbard, timber on Hill Bridge, 

Leander Cooley, repairs on bridge, 

J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber, 

Forward, $426 88 



$51 60 


28 


00 


10 


50 


232 


50 


21 


00 


9 


50 


6 


18 


14 


18 


53 42 



Brought Forward, 
Paid H. S. Porter, lumber, 
L. N. Granger, plank, 
J. D. Porter, labor and material for bridge, 
Wm. P. Allis, overwork on highways, 
0. B. Marsh, earth and tile, 
James Cronin, earth, 
Fitch Bros. & Doane, blacksmith work, 



PAUPERS. 

Paid Hospital for Insane, Northampton, board Francis 

Abbott, 
J. B. Waite, board Wm. and Kolla Wells, 
Merritt Clark & Co., clothing for Rolla Wells, 
Assistance rendered J. 0. Love, 

" " Fred. Hawk, 

F. D. Billings, cash paid Town of Buckland, as 

sistance to Mrs. Haley, 
Hospital for Insane, Brattleboro, Vt., board Oli 

ver Bard well, 
Dr. A. Lewis, medical attendance on families 

Hosea and Selah Wheeler, 
L. S. Bliss, keeping transient paupers, 
F. D. BilliDgs, cash paid clothing Wm. Wells, a 

finding settlement for Mrs. Haley, 
A. M. Peck, burial child H. Wheeler, 
E. A. Bardwell, mdse for Wm. and Rolla Wells, 



STATE AID. 

Paid E. L. Covill, 

Mrs. U. B. Graves, 
" Clara Vining, 
" E. C. Anderson, 

Forward, 



$426 88 


8 90 


56 82 


28 50 


4 00 


8 65 


4 20 


1 25 



$539 20 



$201 


55 


423 


35 


16 


60 


21 25 


16 


15 


13 


50 


130 


00 


3 

30 


00 


38 


50 


md 

10 


75 


3 


50 


5 


51 


$916 68 


$ 1 


50 


96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 



$289 50 



Brought Forward, $289 50 

Paid Mrs. Ruth S. Dennis, 96 00 

John D. Miller, 35 00 



$420 50 



TOWN AID. 



Paid Mrs. U. B. Graves, $88 34 

" Clara Vining, 35 33 

" Helen M. Waite, 35 34 



$159 01 



$250 


83 


1 


50 


1 


00 


20 


00 


1 


50 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Paid for Books, 

for sawing wood, 

Oliver Warner, services at Library, 
E. F. Billings, services as Librarian, 
E. A. Bardwell, cash paid for books, 

$280 83 

MISOELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid A. P. Peck & Co., insurance on School House, 
West Brook, 
Jas. L. Sykes, repairs School House, 
Baker & Mochler, " " 





$51 


00 


use, 


1 


60 


" West Farms, 


34 42 


a 


3 


55 


(< 


IT 


50 


' and Town Hall 


, 22 


75 




10 


00 



A. D. Sweet, 
Geo. E. Smith, 
Wm. Daugherty, " " 
Dexter Jones, " " 

B. E. Oook & Son, clocks for School Houses, 14 50 
Eames & Sprague, stove and pipe, Hill school house, 61 05 
D. & C. W. Holbrook, apparatus for Schools, 19 50 
Henry S. Hubbard, cash paid for copying valua- 
tion book, 1870, 20 00 

Henry S. Hubbard, services as Assessor, 50 00 

F. D. Billings, services as Assessor and cash paid, 50 00 



Forward, , $361 81 



Brought Forward, 



$361 81 



38 50 



39 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


11 


40 


40 


00 


1,600 


00 


6 


u 


19 


58 


9 


00 


21 


50 



Leander Oooley, services as Assessor, and cash paid, 38 00 
Joseph Billings, " and School Com., 

W. D. Billings, services as Clerk, recording births, 

deaths and marriages, cash paid, 
N. T. Abells, damage to horse on highway, 
H. S. Porter, cash paid A. M.Richmond, for Hill 

School House, 
Conn. River R. R., freight on Road Scraper, 
Trumbull & ©ere, printing town reports, 
New England Fire Extinguisher Company, two 

Extinguishers, 
Geo. W. Prentice, Acid for Extinguishers, 
Thayer, Babson & Co., Soda for Extinguishers, 
S. M. Smith & Co., chairs for town hall, 

D. A. Yining, work on burial ground, West Brook, 
Horace Waite, " " " '■' " " 

and lumber, 
Mrs. Polly Graves, money refunded for illegal 

tax, 18T0, 
Solomon Mosher, money refunded for illegal tax, 

1868-9-10, 
Patrick Mullany, money refunded for illegal tax, 

1810, 
Henry Manchester, work on burial ground, West 

Brook, 

E. F. Billings, services as Collector and Consta- 

ble, and cash paid, 1810, 

James F. Brooks, Road Scraper, 

James Porter, services as School Committee, 

A. M. Peck, labor on burial grounds, and return- 
ing deaths, 

E. A. Bardwell, services as Treas., and cash paid 

S. W. Kingsley, blacksmith bill, 

Oscar Belden, services School Committee, 

$2,806 05 



40 30 



38 83 



55 95 



6 96 



14 00 



163 


50 


125 


00 


35 


00 


10 45 


d 26 


45 


3 


60 


30 45 



10 

SCHOOLS. 

Paid Miss Mary J. Strong, teaching and board, $212 00 

" Mary C. Billings, " " " 2V2 00 

Mrs. Jane M. Cowles, " " " 255 00 

Miss Nellie M. Dayton, " " " 96 00 

" Abby Smith, " 186 00 

" Martha Bridges, " 153 00 

" Emma Rhoods, " and board, 188 00 

" Lucy J. Beebe, " 132 00 

" Ella Warner, " 44 00 

" Ella Gibbs, " TO 00 

" J. O. Hall, " 15 00 

O. S. Graves, board, * 134 00 

Mrs. Mary E. Miller, board, 88 00 

Dr. A. Lewis, 132 00 

A. D. Sweet, wood, 41 00 

E. T. Morton, Jr., wood, 23 00 

Wm. P. Allis, " 22 00 

Wm. D. Clapp, coal, T6 98 

J. C. Williams, " 68 19 

Philos Doane, sawing wood, 6 00 

Joseph Billings, expenses procuring teachers, 20 25 

Oliver Warner, services as Janitor, 9 00 

Chas. Anderson, wood, 25 00 

James Porter, cash paid for sundries, 66 21 

Henry R. Graves, board, 48 00 

E. A. Bardwell, sundries, 1 42 

D. W. Allis, board, 94 50 

George Moore, board, 36 00 

Oscar Belden, 31 26 

$2,6U 81 



CENTER SCHOOL HOUSE. 



Paid Anthony Allair, Jr., brick, 
S. G. Hubbard, cash, 
C. B. Smith, cash, 

Forward,' 



$1,300 00 
3,626 45 
1,813 10 

$6,800 15 



11 

Brought Forward, 
A. G. Carpenter, cash, 
Lysander Chaffin, cash, 
N. B. Hussey & Co., cash, 
J. D. Brown, labor, 
J. 0. Williams, coal, 



OUTSTANDING DEBTS. 



$6,800 


15 


583 


83 


230 


00 


218 


04 


23 75 


14 23 



$7,810 00 



Treasurer's Note, to 0. B.Smith, $1,000 00 

" " " Northampton Ins. for Savings, 900 00 

County Tax, 2,329 99 



$4,229 99 



RECAPITULATION 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in hands Treas. and Collector, March, 1871, $7,032 70 

Jos. Abbott, executor legacy to Francis Abbott, 

L. Gr. Curtis, for J. C. Love, 

Edwin Harris, town team and interest, 

Horace Wait, wagon, 

Treasurer's Note to C. B. Smith, 

" " " Northampton Ins. for Savings, 

State Treasurer, Mass. School Fund, 
" State Aid, 

" " Corporation Tax, 

" " National Bank Tax, 

0. C. Wells, highways, 

Forward, 



1 


00 


14 


12 


519 


80 


72 


00 


1,000 


00 


900 


00 


175 23 


458 


00 


198 


04 


2,034 26 


6 


06 


$12,411 21 



12 

Brought Forward, $12,411 21 

F. D. Billings, tools sold, 10 75 

Amount Taxes assessed, 13,639 06 



$26,061 02 



EXPENDITURES. 

Old Bills, 

Paupers, 

Highways and Bridges, 

State Aid, 

Town Aid, 

Miscellaneous Expenses, 

Public Library, 

Schools, 

Center School House, 

State Tax and Interest, 

County Tax, 

L. G. Curtis' Note and Interest, 

Assessors' Order of Abatement, 

Interest, 



549 


92 


916 


66 


539 


20 


420 50 


159 


01 


2,806; 


05 


280 


83 


2,671 81 


7,870 


00 


3,575 79 


2,329 


99 


2,163 


00 


36 


60 


59 


38 



$24,378 74 



Balance in hands of Treas. and Collector, after pay- 
ing all outstanding debts, except Treasurer's 
Notes, 1,682 28 



$26,061 02 



F. D. BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
H. W. FIELD, } of 
J. D. PORTER, ) Hatfield. 



E. A. BARDWELL, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 8, 1872. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield, 



The school year ending March, 1872, is nearly closed, and 
in accordance with the Statute, it is required of the Commit- 
tee to make a yearly report to the Town, as to the expenditure 
of the money, — the present conditions of the Schools, — with 
suggestions relative to the improvement of our School facili- 
ties. The sum appropriated by our Town being $2,700.00, 
with that received from the State, $175.23, amounting to 
$2,875.23, would appropriate to each scholar between five and 
fifteen years of age, $9.21. The Town has removed the stig- 
ma formerfy resting upon us, respecting our School Buildings, 
so that our Houses may no longer be pointed at as a disgrace 
to the Town, or as places suited only to suggest to the pupils 



14 

the propriety of making bonfires of them. With proper 
carefulness, and a feeling of responsibility, as well as of pride, 
our present buildings may be an ornament to the Town for 
many years to come. But while we congratulate ourselves 
that our Houses are better than formerly, this alone will not 
make good Schools. Individual interest has much to do to- 
wards creating and sustaining an interest on the part of the 
scholar, as well as teacher ; and almost invariably where this 
is manifested by parents, in visiting the school, also in other 
ways, we find the teacher pursuing her work with rejoicing. 
School Teachers are human like the rest of us, and influences, 
outside of themselves, may encourage or dishearten, so that 
the burdens of the school-room may be carried by the teacher 
with a light heart, or may weigh heavily upon the most san- 
guine temperament. In connection with these remarks, we 
would not excuse inefficiency in any teacher. Like every de- 
partment in business, the greater the acquaintance with the 
best methods, as well as Tact, to execute those methods, the 
greater the success, and as a Committee, we would feel that 
we are responsible to every tax payer, if this inefficiency is 
the occasion of failure. 

The old subject of Punctuality, which has been harped 
upon so much by School Committees, both to the Schools and 
in the Reports, will need to be agitated a great deal more, to 
accomplish what is desired ; and if your Committee should 
feel it necessary to resort to rigid measures to enforce attend- 
ance, let no one feel that the provocation is not sufficient. 
Our Registers show that in most of our Schools there is a 
fault, in that our scholars do not commence the term when 
school begins, thereby keeping the school in an unsettled con- 
dition for the first two or three weeks, not only losing the time 
themselves, but actually blocking the wheels for those who 
would be prompt. Let the parents of our scholars feel, that 
if our citizens are willing to tax themselves that our children 
may receive a good common school education, have they not 
reason to expect that the beneficiaries of this provision, shall 



15 

even practice some self-denial, that the greatest amount of 
good may result from the appropriation. And when Com- 
mittees or Teachers shall press home upon the minds of those 
interested, the importance of constancy, from the beginning 
to the end of school, let all who are indebted to others for 
their large heartedness in contributing to the highest good of 
the community, respond, we will, by example as well as 
precept, show our gratitude. 

In counting up the marks against the names of some schol- 
ars, we find they show 20, 25, 28, and even 30 tardy marks in 
one term. There must be neglect somewhere. At the same 
time it gives us pleasure to refer to a few Registers, which 
show that the scholars are not all in fault in this respect : 

North Center, summer term, !No. scholars, 44, not tardy, 20 



West Brook, fall term, 


a 


a 


37 


a < 


< 23 


South Center, " " 


u 


a 


42 


it < 


< 24 


Hill Grammar, summer term, 


a 


u 


30 


a 


< 15 


Hill Primary, " " 


a 


a 


49 


a 


< 32 


fall 


a 


a 


41 


a i 


< 23 


" " winter " 


a 


u 


47 


a < 


4 26 



Sum total of tardy marks, 37, 43, 57. 

West Farms, with few exceptions, showed well the entire 
year. 

The Schools during the past year will compare favor- 
ably with previous years. The teachers in six of our Schools 
have been retained the entire year. 

Some of our Schools have shown marked progress. With 
our improved arrangements already secured, for grading our 
Schools, with improved methods for imparting instruction, 
may we not hope that our Schools will be at least one step 
nearer perfection than before. 



16 

Some School Apparatus in each of our School Houses, not 
already furnished, with a new set of Wall Maps, which your 
Committee have in contemplation, will add much to the com- 
pleteness of our new arrangements. 



JAMES PORTEB, ) School 

OSCAK BELDEN, V 

JOSEPH BILLINGS, Committee. 



Amount expended for teaching the several Schools, as 
follows, including teacher's pay and board : — 

High School, - - - $340 00 

Hill Grammar, - - . - 318 00 

Hill Primary, - - - „ 255 00 

Center South, - - - 272 00 

Center North, - 259 50 

North Hatfield, - - - 289 00 

West Brook, - - - 272 00 

West Hatfield, - - - 272 00 
All other expenses connected with the Schools, nearly $475. 



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THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



SMITH ACADEMY 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

By the courtesy of the Selectmen, the Trustees of Smith 
Academy are permitted to submit the following to the voters 
of the Town. 

They would respectfully represent that the late Miss Sophia 
Smith, donated the sum of $75,000, to establish and main- 
tain Smith Academy. 

By the terms of her Will this munificent bequest was to be 
divided into four separate funds, as follows ; — 1st, the Build- 
ing Fund of $20,000, to be used in the erection of Smith 
Academy. The Second Building Fund of $15,000, the in- 
come of so much of the same as shall not be required for a 
second building, together with the income of another fund of 
$10,000, called the Indigent Fund, to be used for the benefit 
of such boys and girls as the Trustees may consider worthy 
and deserving in the payment of their board and tuition 



20 

while attending the Academy. Provision is also made for a 
Permanent Fnnd of $30,000, the income of which is to be 
nsed to support and maintain the School. 

The Trustees have erected for the purposes of the school, 
what they deem to be a suitable building for the accommoda- 
tion of a large and flourishing school. 

From the experience of other similar Institutions, not so 
well endowed as Smith Academy, the Trustees feel warranted 
in assuming that this school will be a success and a perma- 
nent benefit to the town. 

The value of such a school can hardly be computed in the 
influence it will naturally have to elevate and improve the 
Common Schools of the Town. 

The cost of maintaining such an Institution as the Will 
proposes, will be at least $3,300. The income from the per- 
manent fund will be about $2,400 annually, leaving a deficiency 
of $900 to be made up from other sources. Hence we would 
suggest that the Town make an appropriation of money to 
pay the half tuition as required by the Will, so as to make 
this institution a free school to all the children of the Town 
who shall become fitted to avail themselves of its privileges. 

The Trustees earnestly desire to do all they can to secure 
the privileges of this institution to the people of the town. 
They claim that they have no personal ends to serve, and 
they expect that the citizens will meet them with a like un- 
selfish spirit, and unite with them in carrying out the gener- 
ous provisions of the Will, so as to secure its benefits to our 
children. 

Perhaps it may be proper for us to give some of the reasons 
why these proposed higher educational advantages should be 
encouraged and secured by the town. 

By the laws of the Commonwealth the town will soon be 
required to provide a high school where the higher English 
branches and the classics may be taught, this contingency has 
been met by the wise forethought and generosity of Sophia 



21 

Smith, thousands of dollars will thus be saved to the citizens 
of the town which it would otherwise cost them to erect a 
high school building and to support and maintain it there- 
after. 

The Trustees propose to procure if possible permanent 
teachers, such as have qualified themselves to make teaching 
a profession ; a gentleman principal, who, by his superior 
gifts and qualifications can command a first-class salary, also 
a lady principal, who shall be his equal in her sphere as a 
teacher, together with such assistant teachers as the wants of 
the institution shall require from time to time by an increased 
attendance of scholars. 

Our public schools are too much undervalued and neglect- 
ed, they are struggling to do a great work where the church 
cannot reach, and should receive the countenance and prac- 
tical support of all good citizens; two hundred children of 
foreign born citizens are already in our schools, they are to 
become the men and women of the future, they will be intel- 
ligent and virtuous mainly through the influences brought to 
bear upon them in the schools, in their moral and intellectual 
training, if this discipline and instruction is made what it 
should be, then our children and youth will become fitted for 
the practical duties of life. 

We are confident that Smith Academy is destined to do a 
great work in this direction by carrying out more completely 
what is already so well commenced in our common schools. 

The Trustees propose to carry out the provisions of the Will 
in such a manner that the pupils of this institution shall re- 
ceive all the facilities of education furnished by the more ad- 
vanced Academies in the State, and it will be their aim to 
make it equal to the best in its teachers, its discipline and its 
methods of instruction. 

On the first floor of the Academy building, is a room 22 x 
30 feet, suitable for town library, the free use of which is 
offered on the condition of the filling up of the same with 



suitable book cases and furniture, free to the town so long as 
they shall make reasonable appropriations of money annually 
for the purchase of new books. 

We therefore request that the town shall at its annual 
meeting, appoint a committee to confer with the Trustees and 
report at an adjourned meeting of the town, a definite plan 
covering all interests of the town in the Academy, to be acted 
upon at said adjourned meeting. 

J. D. BILLINGS, 
W. H. DICKINSON, 
J. S. GRATES, 
ALPHEUS COWLES,V T 
F.D.BILLINGS, 
D. W. WELLS, 
C. K. MORTON, 
S. G. HUBBARD, 

Hatfield, March 4, 1872. 



REPORTS 



OP THE 



SELECTMEN 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year 1872-3. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. : 

STAB POINTING AND ENGRAVING COMPANY. 

18 73. 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 



The Selectmen, in presenting their Report to the citizens of the 
Town, would say: That the year, ending March 1, 1873, has 
passed unmarked by any event of unusual importance to the 
town, and therefore their duties have been simply to carry out 
their instructions, and the transaction of such business as would 
naturally come before them in the management of town affairs. 

Our cares and responsibilities have been considerably lessened 
by the action of the town at their last annual meeting, whereby 
Road Commissioners were chosen, who have assumed the entire 
charge and control of highways and bridges, and of the expendi- 
ture of funds appropriated for the same. They have made a 
report of their doings and expenditures, which will be found ap- 
pended to that of the Selectmen. 

The expenses for the support of the Poor have somewhat ex- 
ceeded the appropriation, from the fact that there has been an 
unusual number of calls for aid, owing, perhaps, to the prevalence 
of sickness in the Fall, and extreme cold weather of the Winter. 
Beside our regular paupers, we have had applications both for 
permanent and temporary relief. In two instances the applicants 
are women, residents of the town, aged and infirm, and they 
doubtless will need the care and support of the town so long as 
they shall live. We recommend, therefore, that in making appro- 
priations for the ensuing year, these cases be taken into considera- 
tion. We have been called upon to render aid to parties, non- 
residents. Taken sick within our limits, without money or 
friends, they have appealed to us. These we have supplied with 
medical care and attendance until they were able to move on. 
We suppose that a portion, if not all, of the money thus expended, 
may be recovered from the State. In September, we were called 



upon for aid in support of a boy eleven years old. We endeavored 
to find a place where he might earn a part, at least, of his sup- 
port ; but as we could not, we have paid for his board up to the 
present time. He has in the meantime attended school. We are 
making arrangements now, however, whereby we hope he will be 
supplied with a home, and the town relieved of his support. 

In accordance with instructions at the annual meeting, we have 
put blinds upon the school house at West Brook, and builded a 
fence around the same. Owing to a misunderstanding with 
parties, as to building the fence, the matter was delayed until late 
in the season, and we were unable to have it painted before winter 
set in. We have, however, purchased the stock, and made ar- 
rangements to have it done in the Spring. We found, upon con- 
sulting with residents of the District that, instead of having spouts 
and conductors placed upon their building, as proposed in the 
Spring, they preferred to have a portico erected. We did not feel 
bound to put the spouts up contrary to their wishes, neither did 
we feel authorized to build a portico, such as would correspond 
with the rest of the building. We therefore refer the matter to 
the town. The entire cost of blinds, fence, and labor upon the 
same, will be two hundred and twenty-five (225) dollars. 

At the November meeting we were authorized to repair the 
Town Hall. We have made such repairs as we thought advisa- 
ble this winter. Owing to the early and continued cold weather, 
we were unable to make so complete a job as desirable. And we 
would recommend to our successors that a second coating of the 
coloring material be put upon the wall as soon as the weather is 
favorable. We have expended upon the building one hundred and 
thirty-three dollars and fifty-four cents. 

In accordance with instructions, we have purchased eight (8) 
rubber buckets for use with the Fire Extinguishers. And we will 
here say that *for the Engines, purchased by the town in 1871, 
good and suitable places for storage have been provided. 

We desire to call the attention of the town to the fact that there 
is no insurance on the Town Hall and school house in the Hill 
District. These buildings have been insured in the Quincy 
Mutual of Quincy, and the Merchants' and Farmers' of Worcester. 
These companies haying sustained heavy losses by the Boston 



fire, have made assessments upon the policy holders, notifying 
them that in case they fail to pay the assessment before March 
1, 1873, their policies will be canceled. We decided not to pay it. 
We suppose, therefore, that the policies have been canceled. We 
have made inquiries as to the expense of reinsuring, and find 
that in mutual companies the cost will be three or three and one 
half per cent. We are in doubt as to the policy of insuring 
public buildings at such rates, and refer the matter to the town. 

We would say a few words in reference to the Taxes. We be- 
lieve that the best interests of the town demand a more prompt 
collection and payment ; that, in order that the credit of the town 
may be sustained, a greater portion should be collected before 
Dec. 1st, as a greater portion of the obligations of the town be- 
come due before that time. With this end in view, the plan of 
discount and interest was adopted last year. It has undoubtedly 
worked to advantage, yet not so great as desirable ; and we would 
recommend to the town that, if they adopt this plan for the ensu- 
ing year, the limit of discount be Sept. 1st, and' interest be 
charged after Nov. 1st. And while we recommend this, we 
would recommend also that the town take into consideration the 
question whether or not some better plan could be adopted 
whereby the taxes would be more promptly collected, debts paid, 
and the credit of the town thereby sustained. 

In accordance with the vote of the town, authorizing the Select- 
men to instruct the Treasurer to borrow money, if in their opinion 
it was necessary, we have borrowed $1,975. This, with $138, 
amount of bill (not yet presented) for board of Oliver Bardwell at 
the Brattleboro Hospital for Insane, and the bills for services of 
Selectmen, Collector, and Constable, comprises the outstanding 
claims against the town. 

In settlement with the Treasurer, we find in his hands $1,015.94, 
of which $230.41 is cash, and the balance demand notes. 

Upon examination of the Collector's books, we find the- amount 
of taxes still uncollected $1,465.41, making the sum total in hands 
of Treasurer and Collector, $2,481.35, thus showing a balance, 
after all debts are paid, in favor of the town. 



EXPENDITURES. 



OLD BILLS. 



Paid Anthony Allair, Jr., earth for highways, 

E. F. Cooley, labor, " 
C. N. Coleman, drawing coal for schools, 
Horace Shumway, cash paid express, 
L. P. Dole, work on school house hill, 
Austin S. Jones, fence, school house W. Farms, 
H. W. Field, services as Selectman, 

F. D. Billings, " « " 
J. D. Porter, " " " 
Lysander Chaffin, stone and cartage, 
E. F. Billings, services as Collector and Constable, 

1871, 
Wm. P. Allis, labor on highways and cash paid, 
A. D. Sweet, repairs on school house, 
W. B. Langdon, lumber and labor on highway, 
Geo. W. Smith, labor on highway, 
K. H. Belden, services as School Committee, and cash 

paid, 1870, 



11 


79 


5 


75 


2 


00 


3 


00 


25 


00 


35 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


60 


00 


141 


00 


7 00 


4 35 


23 


16 


2 


10 


ish 
32 


75 



$519 90 



SCHOOLS. 



Paid James Porter, paid for school apparatus, $108 26 

Francis Frary, sawing wood, 
Mary J. Strong, services, teacher and board, 
Emma Rhoades, " " 

S. A. Esterbrook, " " 

M. J. Bridges, " " 

Mary C. Billlings, " " 

Fanny Stearns, " u 





5 00 


and board, 


276 00 




60 00 




84 00 




60 00 


and board, 


280 50 




88 00 



Paid Julia E. Wilcox, services, teacher, 
Jane M. Cowles, 
Hattie E. Childs, 
Nellie Hitchcock, 
Lucinda Harwood, 
Elizabeth Royce, 
Maria L. Tuttle 
Myra Elmer, 
Elizabeth Clary, 
Julia Smith, 



aud board, 



and board, 



Chas. Anderson, boarding teacher, 

Sylvanus Miller, " ' ■." 

Oscar Belden, " " 

A. Lewis, " " 

E. M. Martin, " " 

Sylvanus Crafts, " " 

Chas. K. Morton, " " 

S. D. Bartlett, 

Oscar Belden, wood, 

P. L. Strong & Sons ; w T ood, 

Henry S. Hubbard, " 

J. T. &G.C. Fitch, " 

Geo. A. Billings, coal, 

L. Mclntire, 

Oliver Warner, services as Janitor, 

James Porter, cash paid, 

Geo. A. Billings, procuring teachers and cash 

Oscar Belden, cash paid, 

E. A. Bard well, merchandise, 



PAUPERS. 



paid, 



$105 00 

264 00 

58 50 

40 00 

8 00 

28 00 

120 00 

48 00 

60 00 

60 00 

36 00 

180 00 

88 00 

68 00 

76 00 

8 00 

48 00 

48 00 

101 50 

24 59 

5 25 

8 63 

99 11 

13 05 

19 50 
63 00 
39 33 

20 50 
7 52 



$2,707 24 



Paid Hospital for Insane, Northampton, support Francis 

Abbott, $195 90 

J. B. Waite, boarding Wells Bros., 408 00 

J. B. Waite, clothing Wells Bros., 3 50 

Abbott & Ockington, clothing for Win. Wells, 12 00 



8 



Paid E. Braiuard, boarding Harry Bliss, $92 00 

Theo. Porter, boarding Nancy Morton, 56 00 

Sylvanus Crafts, boarding and care John Rodgers, 20 59 
Jas. O. Waite, boarding Nancy Morton, 6 85 

E. A. Bardwell, merchandise, 2 72 

J. T. & G. C. Pitch, merchandise for Wells Bros., 5 51 
A. Lewis, M. D., medical attendance, family 

Hosea Wheeler, $4 00 

A. Lewis, M. D., medical attendance, family ' 

Christian Schroeder, 9 00 

A. Lewis, M. D., medical attendance, Jno. Allis, 13 00 

" " " '" John Rodgers, 8 00 



L. S. Bliss, keeping transient paupers, 
L. S. Bliss, boarding and care John Allis, 
L. P. Dole, boarding Pamelia Dickinson, 



- 34 00 
17 50 
44 00 
68 00 

$966 57 



♦ STATE AID. 



Paid Mrs. Ruth S. Dennis, 
Mrs. Clara Vining, 
Mrs. U. B. Graves, 
Mrs. E. C. Anderson, 
John D. Miller, 



TOWN AID, 



$96 00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


84 00 



$468 00 



Paid Mrs. Helen M. Waite, 
Mrs. Clara Vining, 
Mrs. U. B. Graves, 



$24 67 
34 00 
52 00 



$110 67 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Paid A. Williams & Co., books, 
E. J. Comwell, " 

Bridgman & Childs, " 
E. A. Bardwell, merchandise, 
C. Colton, books, 
E. F. Billings, cash paid, 



$50 80 


18 75 


205 46 


4 66 


6 00 


3 37 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



$289 04 



Paid Turner, Walker & Co., insurance school-house, 
District No. 2, 
C. M. Kinney, hedge plants, 
W. H. Pierce, work on school-house, Dis. No. 2, 
Geo. W. Prentice & Co., sulphuric acid for ex- 
tinguishers, 
L. W. Smith, blinds for school-house, W. Brook, 
Brewster & Jones, glass for book case library, 
W. H. Dickinson, labor on sch'l-house, Dis. No. 2, 
S. G. Hubbard, " " " " 

S. G. Hubbard, Building Committee, labor on school 

house, District No. 2, 
Oscar Belden, fence, school-house W. Farms, 
Oscar Belden, repairs " u 

Wm. P. Allis, services as Assessor, 
Chas. L. Warner, " " cash p'd, 

John W. Morton, " ■ " 

C. B. Smith, book case for library, 
S. D. Porter, surveying, 

L. P. Dole, building fence, school-house W. Brook, 
J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber fence, school-house 

W. Brook, 
L. Mclntire, lime for town hall, 
S. J. Macomber, repairs on town hall, 
Wm. Daugherty, painting " " 



$120 00 


36 


00 


18 


00 


6 


49 


75 


00 


25 


10 


15 


00 


50 
i 


00 


i 
135 00 


25 


00 


19 


GO 


50 


00 


43 


50 


27 00 


164 


26 


5 


00 


37 


75 


72 


57 


6 


50 


57 


24 


40 


00 



10 

Paid Dexter Jones, repairs on town hall, $2 00 

Philos Doane, sawing wood for town hall, 2 00 

Daniel W. Wells, wood, " " 13 00 

Daniel W. Wells, « 7 50 

Todd, Lee & Co., hooks for school-house, 1 75 

O. A. Skilton, spittoons for library, 2 50 

Tiltson & Smith, lamps for " 6 00 

Eames & Sprague, stove for " 27 68 

Smith & Searle, furniture " " 33 00 

Smith & Searle, settees for school-house, 15 00 

Eames & Sprague, repairs school-house pantry, 9 29 

Geo. A. Billings, furniture " Dis.No. 2, 163 08 

Trumbull & Gere, printing reports and order book, $49 00 
Thayer, Babson & Co., soda for extinguishers, 18 78 

A. M. Peck, work on burial grounds and return- 
ing deaths, 16 60 
Luman S. Crafts, [labor and cash paid, school- 
house, W. Brook, 
James Porter, services as School Committee, 
Geo. A. Billings, " " " " 
Oscar Belden, " " " " 
E. A. Bardwell, u "^Treasurer, 
E. A. Bardwell, sundries, 

W. D. Billings, services as Clerk, cash paid express, 
and returning and recording births, deaths and 
marriages, 
S. C. Parsons, paints and glass, 
Buckets for fire extinguishers, 

$1,638 67 



10 


65 


30 


00 


26 


50 


30 


00 


25 


00 


2 


95 


A 




U 

46 


00 


47 


80 


24 


00 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



The Committee herewith present to the inhabitants of the 
town, the following statements of facts, and the amount of ex- 
penses for the past year on highways and bridges. 

We have rebuilt one bridge at Middle, going over ; one south 
of Henry R. Graves', and one at North Meadow. 

We* have repaired the Hill bridge, so that it is nearly as good 
as new ; also, one on the Depot road. 

We have covered the bridges, so far as we have found them 
good enough. On examination of Mill bridge, we find it in very 
bad condition, and recommend the rebuilding of the same as 
soon as possible. 



A. D. SWEET, ) Road Commissioners 

M. E. WARNER, I of 

LEANDER COOLEY, ) Hatfield. 



Hatfield, March, 1873. 



HIGHWAYS, 1872. 

Paid Lysander Chaffin, labor on bridges, $166 62 

A. D. Sweet, labor on highways and bridges, 232 05 

, John D. Miller, labor on " 1100 

W. Herrick, iron, 21 70 

L. Mclntire, cement, 22 00 

Charles Anderson, labor, 181 13 

John Kiley, " 46 37 

Seth W. Kingsley, " 20 70 

Dwight Gibbs, lumber, 48 06 

Leander Cooley, labor, 360 35 

E. S. Warner, « 100 87 

Wm. Hurley, " 13 16 



12 



Paid Charles Graves, labor, 
A. J. Cutter, " 

Jacob Carl, f 

Philip Carl, " 

John Carl, " 

J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber, 
A. Dinsmore, labor, 
John E. Waite, two road scrapers, 
H. Shumway, labor, 
Jas. W. Warner, " 
Lawrence Seitz, " 
Fred Carl, " 

Daniel Vining, " 

L. B. White, lumber, 
Augustus Remillard, labor, 
E, W. Field, " 

John Ryan, " 

Michael Eyan, " 

Moses E. Warner, 
Thomas Lampro, labor, 



A IdLUY _L etui , 

Michael Whalen, 


u 


E. F. Cooley, 


C( 


Jos. Proulx, 2d, 


u 


Edward Briggs, 


a 


Fred Jubinville, 


a 


David B. Curtis, 


u 


Anthony Allair, Jr. 


a 


E. Hubbard, 


u 


Henry Wade. 


a 


H. S. Hubbard, 


a 


John McHugh, 


ti 


Dennis Cooley, 


a 


Albert Briggs, 


a 


M. N. Hubbard, 


u 


Hartwell & Prindle 


i, tile, 


Henry Manchester, 


labor, 


Nelson Allair, 


u 



$21 


00 


18 


20 


93 


20 


44 


65 


52 


10 


603 


46 


19 


10 


30 


00 


36 


00 


144 3? 


7 


00 


60 


50 


28 


75 


140 01 


17 


00 


15 


70 


1 


00 


5 


00 


75 


50 


10 


00 


5 


00 


14 


50 


19 


50 


4 


00 


7 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


84 


25 


7 00 


1 


50 


10 


00 


9 


00 


14 


75 


2 


00 


5 


00 


64 


26 


6 


65 



8 00 



13 



Peter Pecor, 
H. S. Porter, 
John Chandler, 
Horace Waite, 
James 0. Waite, 
John Ryan, 
Patrick Mullany, 
Elihu Marsh, 
Moses Kingley, 
James Porter, 
P. If. Belden, 
E. Morton, 
C. D. Bartlett, 



Highways, total. 
Bridges, " 



labor, 



BILLS RECEIVABLE. 



$6 


00 


13 


50 


5 


00 


10 


50 




65 


1 


50 


8 


00 


5 


80 


1 


00 


1 


00 


16 


00 


19 


00 


3 


75 


$3,016 66 


$1,460 62 


1,556 


04 



1,016 66 



Note D. P. Morton, to Town Treas., $155 25 

" Alvin Sanderson and J. E. Doane, to Town Treas., 120 00 
" Silas Porter, to Town Treas., 300 00 

" J. D. Brown, to Town Treas., 210 28 



$785 53 



OUTSTANDING DEBTS, 



Treasurer's note to Northampton Instit. for Savings, 
Hospital for Insane, Brattleboro, Vt., support Oliver 
Bardwell, to March 1, 1873, 



$1,975 00 



138 00 



14 



RECAPITULATION 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in hands Treas. and Collector, March, 1872, $1,682 28 

Moses Kingsley, highways, 1871, 

Dog Fund, " 

State Treasurer, Corporation Tax, " 

Treasurer's Note to Northampton Ins. for Savings, 
a u u u a 

State Treasurer, Mass. School Fund, 

" " State Aid, 

" " Corporation Tax, 

Jos. Billings, rent Town Hall, 
Arthur Curtis, stone, 
Interest, 

Bent of engine room, 
Amount taxes assessed, 
Interest on taxes, 



15 


00 


65 


22 


76 


05 


1,600 


00 


1,975 


00 


159 


86 


400 


00 


229 


29 


3 


00 


14 


81 


20 


00 


50 


00 


13,686 04 


86 


06 


$20,062 


61 






15 



EXPENDITURES. 

Old bills, . $519 90 

Schools, 

Paupers, 

State aid, 

Town " 

Public Library, 

Miscellaneous, 

Order Road Commissioners, 

Assessors' order of abatement, 

Interest of County tax, 1871, 

Northampton Ins. for Savings, Note and Interest, 

U U U U U U (( 

C. B. Smith, note and interest, 
Northampton Ins. for Savings, interest, 
State tax and interest, 
County " " " 
Discount on taxes, 

Balance in hands of Treasurer and Collector, 



JOSEPH BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
L. G. CURTIS, i of 

MOSES E. WARNER, ) Hatfield. 

E. A. BARDWELL, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 8, 1873. 



2,707 


24 


966 


57 


468 


00 


110 


67 


289 


04 


1,638 


67 


3,016 


QQ 


96 


99 


113 


33 


936 


68 


1,656 


62 


1,110 


55 


16 


90 


2,292 


37 


2,010 


78 


415 


83 


$18,366 80 


1,695 


81 


$20,062 61 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The School Committee, as a part of the duty assigned them, 
respectfully present their Annual Report of the condition of the 
Schools in town. 

The whole number of Schools supported by the town the past 
year was ten. On the opening of Smith Academy, winter term, 
the High School was dispensed with, the scholars entering that 
institution. 

The whole number of Teachers employed the past year was 
fifteen, all females. Nearly all were teachers of experience, and 
the progress made will compare favorably with previous years. 

The advantages for grading are better now than they ever have 
been before, from which we see good results, especially in the Hill 
and Street schools. The other schools do not enjoy this advan- 
tage so fully, on account of their remote situation. 

The town raised $3,000 for the support of scliools the past 
year. In addition to this, we received $159.86 from the State 
school fund ; also $65.22 from the dog fund, — all making the sum 
of $3,225.08, — an amount sufficiently large to pay the current 
expenses of the several schools, and leave over three hundred 
dollars unappropriated. 

The different items are about the same as in years before. In 
some instances, wages paid to teachers were a little higher. We 
have aimed to furnish teachers of experience and reputation, 
which are not to be had without liberal pay. And then it is diffi- 
cult to supply wholly with this class ; though, as a town, we should 
be satisfied with nothing less than a superior teapher for every 
school. The progress that scholars make depends mainly upon 
the ability of the teacher. 

Two of our schools — the Hill Grammar and West Farms — 



17 

have had the benefit of Normal School Teachers the past winter. 
We cannot speak too highly of this method of teaching. Every 
thing is rendered practical ; every pupil in tarn becomes a teacher, 
to the extent that he must thoroughly understand the subject of 
his lesson, and be able to explain and teach it to others. This 
thoroughness enables him to finish whatever he goes over, and to 
advance in systematic order. Another feature is a good use of 
language, acquired by the scholar, in giving plain explanations. 

The number of visits reported on the Registers are one hundred 
and eighty — town's people, mostly. Among these (except the 
Committee) are the names of only three gentlemen : Rev. J. P. 
Skeel, S. D. Bartlett, D. W. Wells. This lack of personal inter- 
est on the part of fathers has an unfavorable influence. 

Scholars that are not taught the worth of educational advan- 
tages by parental influences, make little progress compared with 
those who are. We need revolutionizing in this matter to make 
our schools what they should be. 

Many of our Foreign children make little progress in their 
studies at school, and in acquiring good English, owing to the use 
of their native language at home. This could in a measure be 
remedied if such families would speak English wholly, as far as 
they are able. Such an effort would be amply rewarded by the 
benefit the children would receive. 

Last Spring all our schools were supplied with a set of Mitch- 
ell's Outline Maps, at a cost of $108.26, — paid for out of the last 
year's money. They have greatly increased the interest in the 
study of Geography. 

No. of Scholars in Town between the ages of 5 and 15 years, . 291 

Last year, the number was 312 

No, of Foreign Scholars in School the past Winter, . . . 178 

American Scholars, 94 

The Committee were obliged to supply furniture for one of the 
school rooms in the new Center School House, at an expense of 
$163.08. 

The school house at West Farms needs some repairs, — a new 
coat of plastering in the lower room, some new seats and doors ; 
also new window-blinds. 



18 



Names of Teachers and Wages Paid, per Month, including Board. 

r>r.^4^ n . ( tvt t c+™„™ ) Summer and Fall $ 32 00 

Fantr y ^ Mary J. Strong $ Winte rV.. 36 00 

( Emma Rhood Summer 32 00 

West Brook 2 Labbie M. Royce Fall.... 32 00 

( Myra Elmer Winter 32 00 

rrm n„„ £ J ulia E - Wilcox Summer and Fall 36 00 

Hill ^^^'••••jMariaM. TuW Winter 40 00 

Hill Primary Jane M. Cowles 32 00 

f Mattie J. Bridges Summer 36 00 

Center Grammar ..< Nettie M. Hitchcock.. Fall 36 00 

( Julia R. Smith Winter 36 00 

Center Primary Mary C. Billings 34 00 

C Fannie E. Stearns .... Summer and Fall .... 32 00 
"£ Lizzie S. Clary Winter 36 00 

C S. A. Esterbrook Summer 44 00 

") HattieE. Child Fall 42 00 



West Farms. 



High School. 






Whole Amount paid for Wages and Board $2,176 50 

All other Expenses connected with the Schools $530 54 



JAMES PORTER, 
GEO. A. BILLINGS, 
OSCAR BELDEN, 



School Committee. 



Hatfield, March 6, 1873. 



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REPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE. 



The Library Committee have to report, for the year ending 
March 1st, an expenditure of 1289.04 of the annual appropriation 
for the support of the library. During the year we have made 
additions of nearly two hundred volumes, and would say that the 
books were never in better condition for circulation than at the 
present time. 

By a vote of the town, at the annual meeting, the offer of a 
room for Library purposes, in the Smith Academy, by the Trus- 
tees of that institution, was accepted, and the Committee accord- 
ingly instructed to furnish and tit up the room suitably for the 
reception of the books. This has been done, and the books 
transferred. The entire cost has been $258.43. "We find, how- 
ever, upon arranging the books upon the new shelves, that, with 
those we have purchased the past year, we have not shelf-room 
enough. We therefore recommend that, in addition to the sum 
of $300.00, a sum sufficient for the erection of additional shelves 
be appropriated, and the Committee for the ensuing year be 
authorized to expend the same. 



THADDEUS GRAVES, ) 

CHAS. K. MORTON, > ^Library 

JOSEPH BILLINGS, 



Committee. 



REPORTS 



OF 



SELECTMEN, 

ROAD COMMISSIONERS, 

SCHOOL AND LIBRARY 

COMMITTEE 

OF THE 

■TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year 1873-4. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS.: 
STAR PRINTING AND ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

1874. 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 



As the financial year 1873 — 4 draws to a close, it again be- 
comes the duty of the Selectmen to render an account of 
their official transactions, and of the receipts and expendi- 
tures during that time. We therefore present to the Inhab- 
itants of the Town the following report. 

In view of the hard times and scarcity of money, during 
the past few months, it has been the desire and endeavor of 
the Selectmen, and other Officers, to curtail and reduce the 
expenses, whenever and wherever it might be done without 
prejudice to the interest of the Town, and it will be seen, 
upon examination, that with one or two exceptions the ex- 
penditures in all the departments have been considerably less 
than the appropriations at our last annual meeting. 

For the support and aid of the Poor our expenses have 
exceeded the amount raised. This is accounted for 
by the fact that there has been an increase not only in the 
number but also in several cases in the cost of maintenance! 
as in the case of Oliver Bardwell the cost has been increased 
from $2.50 to $3.50 per week. Also in the case of Miss Pa- 
melia Dickinson, who, having met with a serious accident in 
the Fall, has been quite sick since, some of the time extremely 
ill and crazy, so as to require two attendants, consequently 
her expenses have been greatly increased as compared with 



SCHOOLS. 



Paid Mary C. Billings, teacher and board, $3*4 50 

Kate Williams, u " " 195 50 

Jessie Whitman, " "•' "" 290 00 

Jane M. Cowles, " " " 288 00 

Alice Bartlett, " " " 290 00 

Edwards, " " " 80 00 

H. P. Miller, " " " 112 00 

Hattie D. Thompson, teacher, 132 00 

Lizzie Clary, " 54 00 

Mary E. Wells, " 98 00 

Ellen Bartlett, " 63 00 

Charlotte W. Billings, board of teachers, 144 00 

Chas. E. Hubbard, " " " 48 00 

E. Martin, " lt " 48 00 

L, Mclntire, coal, ; 10 00 

S. G. Hubbard, coal, 136 30 

Philip Carl, drawing coal, 7 00 

H. Shumway, " " 2 50 

P. L. Strong & Sons, wood, 30 00 

Oscar Belden, " 14 00 

H. S. Hubbard, " 23 00 

Leander Cooley, " 30 00 

Philos Doane, sawing " 4 75 

Henry Dwight, " "....". 8 00 

Oliver Warner, services as janitor, 5 00 

Charles Moore, " " " 31 25 
George A. Billings, expenses Teachers' Institute, 18 20 

Henry Dwight, board of teacher, 56 00 

David Powers, sawing wood, 5 25 

Oscar Belden, cash paid for building fires, 6 00 

George Kingsley, " 10 00 



$ 2 554 25 



SCHOOL HOUSE„-WEST FARMS 

Paid White Bro's. labor, lumber, and blinds, 
S. B. Nickerson, painting, 
L. Mclntire, lime, 



205 


71 


172 


25 


163 98 


T 55 


90 


25 


00 


300 


50 


28 


00 


260 


75 


35 


00 


18 


00 


13 


00 


14 


16 



PAUPERS. 

Paid for support of Nancy Morton, 
" Oliver Bardvvell, 
" " " Francis Abbott, 

" " " Jane Stone and family, 

" " " Francis Ballau, 

" " " Pamelia Dickinson, 

" " " George Hathaway, 

" Wm. and Rolla Wells, 
" " " Family of James Buckley, 

L. S. Bliss, Tramps, 
H. Shumway, " 
Mdse. Hunt & Dole, 



STATE AID. 

Paid John D. Miller, 

Mrs. Ruth Dennis, 
Mrs. Clara Vining, 
Mrs. Minerva Anderson, 
Mrs U. B. Graves, 



TOWN AID. 

Paid Mrs. U. B. Graves, $35 66 

Mrs. Clara Vining, 34 66 



39 2 2 5 



$7 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 


96 


00 



$70 32 



P35 


80 


45 


00 


16 


50 



$197 30 



112 


oo 


5 


85 


3 2 


66 


i 


05 


4 


00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Paid Thaddeus Graves, books, 
J. Cornwell, " 

Bridgman & Childs, " 
E. A. Bardwell, Mdse. 
E. F. Billings, books, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Paid Win. Daughterly, painting school house Dist. 1, 23 40 
Star Printing Company, printing reports, order 

book, 53 00 

S. W. Hopkins, decoration day, 5 00 

W. D. Billings, assessing taxes and cash paid, 73 00 

Charles Anderson, plants for cemetery, West 

Brook, 35 56 

Thaddeus Graves, making deed, 2 00 

A. M. Peck, labor on cemetery, 17 70 

S. G. Hubbard, services as clerk pro tern, 5 00 

L. P. Dole, repairs on school house Dist. No. 1, 10 50 
D. W. Wells, building school house fence Dist. 

No. 2, 32 00 

H. R. Graves, labor in cemetery, West Brook. 10 00 
Dexter Jones, repairs Town Hall, 4 00 

Oscar Belden, services as Assessor, 27 00 

H. S. Porter, " " " 27 00 

James Porter, services as School Com. and cash 

paid, 62 20 

Mrs John Shehan, cleaning school house, 75 

White Bro's., building portico school house W. 

Brook, 75 00 

Hatfield Band, Decoration Day, 3c 00 

Wm. Daugherty, painting and repairs school 

house, 14 97 

L. S. Crafts, repairs school house, 5 50 

Alvin Dinsmore, '.* •".,.-■" 35° 

M. H. Burke, painting " " 47 .75 

" " " conductors Town Hall 5 10 






Todd, Lee & Co., mdse., 

B. E. Cook & Son, clocks for school house, 

H. Shumway, carriage Decoration Day, 

A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 

N. B. Hussey, stove fixtures school house, 

Eames & Sprague, stove for Town Hall, 

" " " and fixtures for school 

house, 
Smith & Searle, furniture for school house, 
E. Hubbard, music Decoration Day, 
Joseph Billings, cash paid, 
E. A. Bardwell, mdse. for schools, 

" " services as Treas. and cash paid, 

Henry Dwight, repairs school house, 
W. D. Billings, services as Town Clerk, cash 

paid, recording and returning births, 

deaths and marriages, 50 00 

Oscar Belden, services as School Com. and' cash 

paid, 48 19 

G. A. Billings, services as School Com. and cash 





80 


13 


00 


6 


25 


7 


00 


6 


90 


14 


l 9 


37 


18 


8 


2 5 


7 


00 


15 


00 


5 


82 


27 


5° 


1 


00 



I 20 



paid, 

G. A. Billings, incidental expenses schools 6 40 

James Porter, 46 40 



$952 0.1 

REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



The Commissioners present to the Town the folloing state- 
ments and facts, and the amount of expense for the past year 
on Highways and Bridges. A large part of the money has 
been expended in hardening the Roads in the West Brook Dist. 
and Plain road. We would also recommend the hardening of 
the road from Edmund Powers' to the old Depot station. 



12 



BILLS RECEIVABLE, 



Note and Interest, John D. Brown, $226 30 

" " Alvin Sanderson, 136 10 

" " D wight P. Morton, 170 65 



BILLS PAYABLE, 

For support of Oliver Bardwell to March 1st, 
" Francis Abbott " 
" " " Jane Stone and family to March 1st, 
« u u Wnu Wells, " " " 

Services of Selectmen 1873, 

" " Cons. Coll. and Librarian, 

Public Library, 

Medical Attendance, 

Treasr's Note to Northampton Instit. for Savings, 

Oscar Belden, 



RECAPITULATION, 



RECEIPTS. 



Bal. in hands of Treas. and Coll. March 1873, 

Assessment of Taxes, 

Dog fund 1872, 

Note and Interest of Silas Porter, 

State Treasurer Nat. Bank Tax, 

" " State Aid, 

" " " Paupers, 

" " Mass. School fund, 

" " Corporation Tax, 

Mrs. Sophia Bliss, reimbursement for support 

child, 
Interest on Taxes, 



$533 05 



28 


00 


28 


00 


50 


00 


68 


00 


*5'° 


00 


150 


00 


5o 


00 


6 


50 


1975 


00 


70 


00 



$ 2 575 5° 



$1695 


81 


12114 


00 


104 


5i 


3 T 3 


50 


2746 


24 


400 


00 


25 


00 


138 


22 


146 


49 


of 




92 


00 


57 


13 



$17832 90 



13 

EXPENDITURES. 

Old Bills, 

Paupers, 

Schools, 

State Aid, 

Town " 

Highways and Bridges, 

Miscellaneous, 

Public Library, 

County Tax, 

Interest on same, 

State Tax, 

Abatement of Taxes, 

Interest on Note in Savings Bank, 

Discount on Taxes, 

School House, — West Farms, 



Balance in hands of Treas. and Coll. 



$5^5 


20 


1392 


25 


2 554 


25 


39 1 


00 


70 


3 2 


2141 


5i 


95 2 


01 


i55 


56 


1974 


75 


[O 


CO 


2407 


50 


81 


46 


,38 


80 


317 


42 


197 


3° 


$'33^9 


33 


4463 


57 


$17832 


90 



JOSEPH BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
L. G. CURTIS, ot 

E. A. STRONG, ) Hatfield. 

E. A. BARDWELL, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 6, 1874. 

APPRO PRI ATIONS. 1873. 



Highways & Bridges, .. $2500 00 

Paupers, 1300 00 

Schools, 3000 00 

Contingencies, 1600 00 

Public Library, 300 00 

Cases for Library, 150 00 

Decoration Day, 75 00 

School House at West Farms, 200 00 

Town Aid, 90 00 



14 

List of Jurors for 1874^ as revised and submitted to 

the Town by the Selectmen. 

Joseph D. Billings, Chas. L. Graves, 

Edwin Brainard, Saml. P. Billings, 

Daniel A. Vining, Alvin Sanderson, 

Michael Larkin, John E. Doane, 

Henry G. Moore, Joseph Billings, 

R. H. Belden, Elihu Marsh, 

Henry L. Waite, Philip Carl, 

Henry Dwight, C. K. Morton, 

M. N. Hubbard, Henry R. Graves, 

E. S. Warner, S. E. Witherell, 



REPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE. 



The Library Committee report for the year, ending March 
ist. 1874, an expenditure for books and incidental expenses 
the sum of $155.56. In addition to this there are outstanding 
bills to the amount of about $50.00. 

At the last annual meeting, in addition to the annual ap- 
propriation, the sum of $150.00 was raised for the purpose- of 
erecting additional sheh^es in the room at the Smith Acad- 
emy, used by the Town as a Library, and the Committee 
were authorized to expend the same. Although the shelves 
are needed, the Committee have not expended the money for 
the simple reason that they have learned that the Town have 
no legal control of the room since the Trustees had no right 
to give to the Town the free use of it, which they had previa 
ously done, and under the circumstances they deemed it an 
injudicious expenditure of the public funds. 

THADDEUS GRAVES, ) Library 
W. D. BILLINGS, 



JOSEPH BILLINGS, ) Committee 



15 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

OF THE 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

For the Year 1 ^^3-4. 



A review of the workings of our Schools for the past year 
does not suggest any features of unusual importance to pre- 
sent for your consideration. There are, however, in taking a 
general view, some evidences of material progress, which, 
although perhaps not so perceptible in their present results, 
nevertheless have an important bearing on the development 
of a thorough and practical system of education in our Com- 
mon Schools. 

The systems of education which are and have been so per- 
sistently advocated by the best educators of our day, and 
which have so long been neglected by many of our towns, as 
impracticable to be introduced in our lower and mixed grade 
schools are unconsciously, it would seem in many instances, 
introducing themselves and being established by the commit- 
tee and teachers as the method of instruction. And we are 
gratified to find in our own schools, though but one of those 
employed has had the advantages of the Normal course of 
training, that the teachers generally have labored not so 
much to fill the mind, of the pupil with words, and to them 
obscure and meaningless phrases, as with ideas practical in 
their nature, and so presented as to be attractive and valua- 
ble. We do not say that in all cases they have succeeded in 
this, but we find cause for congratulation even in the fact 
that the tendency is in that direction. 



16 

We have no prejudice against text books, are ready, even, 
to grant all that is claimed for them. But we do insist that 
when they are forced to assume the functions rightly belong- 
ing to the teacher, they tail of accomplishing their true de- 
sign. 

There is a large class of children among us who are re- 
ceiving in our lower grade schools all the educational advan- 
tages they will probably ever have. It is essential, therefore, 
that the instruction be thorough and complete, that habits of 
thought and action be formed which shall create a desire for 
something higher and better, that when released from the 
restraints of teicher and incentives of school, there may be in 
them as the foundation of future success, a continual desire 
to know more. 

The study of Geography^in most of our Schools is being 
made more attractive and profitable, and the teaching 
of it to our mind more effective. The descriptive part is 
made of less importance and the location of places, and the 
indicating of the important features of the Country are 
made prominent. We commend as an important aid 

in the study of this branch the custom of map drawing, 
which is now practiced with such good results.' It tends to 
fix in the mind the relative posiiion of countries and their 
parts as we believe no other method can, and we are gratified 
with the proficency already attained in some schools in this 
direction, It is also exceedingly useful as a discipline in the 
art of drawing, which by an act of the Legislature is made a 
part of the course of study of each school in the Common- 
wealth. 

Something has been done although we have made but slight 
progress towards fulfilling in our school the requirements of 
this Statute. It is something new for the Common School, 
and few teachers are now fitted to give instruction in it. 
Hence some time will necessarily elapse before we shall be able 
to reach a high Standard of Excellence in its study. Yet we 
feel assured from the interest already manifested, that the 
study and practice of this branch in all our schools will 
be of decided advantage. It is no longer to be advocated 
as simply one of the accomplishments, to be studied only by 



17 

those who have a natural and peculiar taste for it, and who 
are aiming to excel in it as an art, but rather as constituting 
an essential department in our system of instruction, and 
should the State ever assume the direction of the course of 
study, in our Public Schools, it will undoubtedly be pre- 
scribed as an important branch. 

We sincerely wish that wt could retain a sense of duty 
performed and be able to close our report without referring 
to the sad neglect of school privileges manifested in the 
alarming extent of irregular attendance. It is an evil for 
which some remedy must speedily be provided, otherwise 
our schools will fail of attaining that which ail 
undoubtedly most desire, a high degree of excellence. We 
may have fine school buildings, a corps of teachers of rare 
ability, and every other facility for successful schools^ but 
unless our children can be made to realize that prompt and 
faithful attendance are an element of their education of the 
highest importance, there will be but comparatively little 
real progress. How the reform shall be accomplished is the 
question that is puzzling committees and others who are in- 
terested in education. One thing is certain no remedy of a 
permanent nature can be provided until parents shall under- 
stand the wrong they are inflicting upon their children by 
allowing them to be careless about their attendance. Teach- 
ers are disheartened, classes are disordered, and the progress 
really made will continue to be far from satisfactory. Com- 
mittees and teachers should be, and are willing to bear their 
share of the blame, but the real cause of so many apparent 
failures attributed to teachers, may, after all, too often be 
traced to parental neglect. 

We are earnest in our commendation of those who have 
been neither tardy nor absent during the school year just 
closed, and whose names will appear in this report. We have 
hardly less praise for those who have exerted themselves so 
faithfully to be among that number. Some have succeeded 
in attending two terms without an instance of tardiness or ab- 
sence. Many deserve our approbation and encouragement 
But there is a large class yet remaining who are apparently in- 
different, and in whose behalf earnest and persistent effort 
needs to be made. 



18 

The grounds surrounding the school building at the Cen- 
ter, still remain in an unfinished condition. It will be re- 
membered that at the annual meeting of 1872 a sum of 
money was appropriated based upon the estimates of the 
building committee sufficient to grade the grounds and en- 
close with a substantial fence, and this committee were au- 
thorized to execute the provisions of the resolution. The 
grounds have been partially graded, a fence has been erected 
in front of the building, and at that point the work remains- 
If the appropriation has already been expended, we would 
suggest that a sum of money be raised sufficiently large to 
accomplish the work in a manner creditable to the town. 

The heating apparatus of the building in this distiict has 
been severely criticised duiing the past winter and pro- 
nounced by some inadequate to the service required of it. 
It is quite evident to all who are informed about it that dur- 
ing the intense cold of the winter, some method must be 
adopted which shall render the rooms more comfortable. We 
have endeavored to make the best of the means already pro- 
vided, during the cold weather, this winter, preferring to 
leave the decision of the matter with the judgment of the 
town. We recommend, however, that stoves be placed in 
each of the rooms, and that the furnace remain as it is, for 
use during the milder seasons of the the year. We 
recommend also an appropriation for the school property at 
West Hatfield. The building needs painting, and it will be 
necessary to rebuild the fence, — some parts of it at least. 

Our school expenditures the past year have slightly ex- 
ceeded the amount of the previous year. Tnis is to be ac- 
counted for by increased length of schools and extra ex- 
penses for repairs. In several of the schools we have 
lengthened the sessions to thirty-seven weeks as the aggre- 
gate length for the year, and should have pursued the same 
course with all, had circumstances permitted. We recom- 
mend the same appropriation as last year. 

The number of scholars who have attended school the en- 
tire year without an absent or tardy mark is five. Their 
names are as follows : Freddie A Hair, Etta Crafts, Lizzie 
H. Billings, Mary W. Allis, Johnnie Tero. 



19 

No. of scholars between the ages of five and fifteen, , 300 

Last year the No. was . . .■ . . 291 

No. of teachers employed, , . . . ., it 

Average No. of scholars in all the schools for the year, 277 

" attendance . . . ■ «.«<> ,212 

No. of children over fifteen, . . 13 

" " " under five, . . 9 

Names of Teachers and Wages Paid, per Month, Including Board. 



TT .„ r, ( T . tj w , ., t Summer and Fall. ..$36 00 

Hill Grammar.. . . j Jessie R. Whitman I Winter % 0Q f338 QQ 

ffill -Primary Jane M. Cowles... . . .. ., 32 00 228 00 

fpntr* Qrnmmnr ) Hattie D. Thompson ) Summer and Fall. .. 40 00 

centre Ui ammar. . -j Mary E WeUg j- Winter _ 44 00 374 00 

■Oenter Primary. Mary C. Billings 34 00 314 50 

Xrrth HatfieU.. . . \ Alice L. Bartlett [ ISanT^er";: g g} 290 M 

I Lizzie S. Clary 1 Snmm „ r „. nn ■ 

"" Brook fe^t&;:: [SSSZSm^i ££ m m 

w t u i-ft ?w S Kate C. Williams.... \ Summer and Fall... 32 00 

west naijieia { EUen M Bartlett _ # f Winter. 32 00 314 50 

Amount expended for teachers and board, $2,213 00 

All other Expenses connected with Schools $762 12 

Amount of Appropriation .$3,000 00 

" received from State Sehool Fund 138 22 



JAMES PORTER, 

OSCAR BELDEN, }■ School Committee. 

G. A. BILLINGS, 



Hatfield March 9, 1873. 



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REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN", 



THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



AND THE 



COMMITTEE ON ROADS AND BRIDGES 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For tiie Year 1874—5. 



NORTHAMPTON MASS.: 
PRESS OF STAR PRINTING OFFICE, 

1875. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the citizens of the Town of Hatfield the Selectmen 
present the following report of their doings, aud of the ex- 
penditures for the year ending March ist, 1875. 

Notwithstanding a desire on our part to economize and re- 
duce expenses, we find, that for the support of the Poor we 
have somewhat exceeded the appropriation, although we had 
supposed that ample provison had been made for this purpose. 
We find this to be the case throughout the State, owing, doubt- 
less to a general stagnation of business, and to the unusual 
severity of the past winter. This extra expense has been in 
a great measure for the support of that class of Paupers com- 
monly known as " tramps," many of whom make their living 
by traveling from town to town, applying for food and lodg- 
ings wherever night may overtake them. It is to be hoped 
that the Legislature will make some change in the laws which 
relate to this class of people, as they have become a pest and 
a nuisance to every community in the state. We have had 
an unusual number of applications for temporary assistance. 
Of these we hope to be relieved as soon as spring opens, and 
people can get work. We are now supporting three persons 
in Insane Asylums, Catherine Tobin having been added to 
the list within the year. Have buried two persons at the ex- 
pense of the town : William Wells and Ashley Wheeler. 

On account of the frequent fires which have occurred with- 
in the town during the past winter, we have been led to make 
inquiries as to the efficiency and cost of Fire Hooks and Lad- 



ders, with a view of purchasing such, provided they were not 
too expensive. We found the cost would be greater than we 
anticipated and did not feel justified in expending the amount 
necessary for this purpose, without direct authority from the 
town. We would however recommend that such apparatus 
be procured, and will present the matter to you for your con- 
sideration at the Annual Meeting. 

Our attention has also been called to the matter of Insur- 
ance upon our public buildings. You will recollect that in 
acordatfee with a vote of the town, two years since, the poli- 
cies upon some of the buildings were dropped, or allowed to 
expire without renewal. It seems to be an open question, 
whether or not these buildings should be re-insured. This 
matter will also be brought before you at the Annual Meet- 
ing. The following are the buildings which are now insured, 
and amount of Policies upon same. 

School House, West Brook, $2,500. 

" " Dist. No. 2, 6,000. 

Town Hall, 1,000. 

It will be remembered that at a special meeting, the town, 
by vote, authorized the Treasurer to borrow, if neccessary, a 
sufficient sum to meet the demands of Edward Moseley, for 
damages resulting from the falling of Pine Bridge. In ac- 
cordance with this vote he has borrowed $6,550 for which he 
has given his note. These with the note held by the North- 
ampton Savings Bank, and bills amounting to $610 comprises 
the outstanding obligations. Total, $9135.00. To offset this 
we find in the hands of the Treasurer, cash $59.83, demand 
notes and interest, $567.67. In the hands of the Collector 
$3184.64. Total, $3812.14, — leaving a balance of $5322.86 as 
the indebtedness of the town. 



8UMMAEY. 



Outstanding Bills, $ 610 oo 

Notes in Savings Banks, 8525 00 



In hands of Treasurer, Cash, $ 59 &$ 
11 " " " Demand notes 

and interest, 567 67 

In hands of Collector, 3184 64 



1135 00 



3812 14 



Indebtedness of the town, $5322.86 



EXPENDITUEES. 



OLD BILLS. 

Paid L. S. Crafts, care watering tank, $ 

Oscar Belden, repairs school house W. Farms, 
H. D. Anderson, labor cemetery West Brook, 
Henry R. Graves, committee to repair school 

house, West Brook, 
Joseph Billings, services Selectman, 
L. S. Bliss, Board Tramps, 
Support Jane Stone, 
Wm. Wells, 
" Francis Abbott, 
" Jane Stone, 
Thomas Cutler, board tramps, 
A. E. Strong, services selectman, 
L. G. Curtis, 
Support Oliver Bardwell, 
C. M. Barton, M. D., medical services Pamelia 

Dickinson, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, labor school house Dist. 

No. 2, 1872, 
G. A. Pierce, M. D., medical services family 

Hosea Wheeler, 
E. F. Billings, services collector, constable, 

librarian and cash paid, 
Moses E. Warner, highways, 



PAUPERS. 

Paid support of Pamelia Dickinson, 
" Nancy Morton, 



5 


00 


69 8$ 


6 


25 


5 


00 


100 


00 


21 


00 


24 


00 


68 


00 


28 


00 


30 


00 


7 


5° 


*5 


00 


2 5 


00 


3° 


00 



6 50 



15 


00 


10 


00 


165 


00 


15 


00 



$646.08 

$293 00 
173 70 



Paid support of Oliver Bardwell, 


168 oo 


" Francis Abbott, 


166 05 


" Catherine Tobin, 


57 o° 


" Jane Stone and family, 


191 00 


Wm. Wells, 


105 92 


" Honora McCarty, 


24 00 


" Lewis Beaugor, 


17 00 


" Lewis Covill, 


10 00 


" Buckley children, 


58 50 


G. A. Pierce, M. D., professional services 




Buckley children, 


106 00 


Funeral expenses Wm. Wells, 


18 00 


Ashley Wheeler, 


r6 00 


H. Shumway, board tramps, 


85 00 


Thomas Cutter, " " 


8 00 



CEMETERY.— PANTRY. 

Paid C. S. Chapman, labor, 
E. Judd, lumber, 
Erastus Strong, labor, 
J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber, 
I. R. Clark, painting and material, 



SCHOOL HOUSE.— PANTRY. 

Paid A. E. Strong, repairs, 

G. F. Boyington, painting and material, 
A. E. Strong, labor, 



SCHOOL HOUSE DIST. NO. II. 



$M97.i7 



$20 


25 


46 


30 


14 


00 


59 


70 


23 


60 



$163.85 



$33 


5o 


9i 


61 


29 


5o 



$154.61 



Paid Michael Boyle, labor, $29 00 

John McHugh, " 18 75 



8 



Paid Lysander Chaffin, " 10 oo 

Geo. A. Billlings, " and cash paid, 
J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber, 
L. B White, lumber and labor, 
Wm. Daugherty, painting, 



LAND DAMAGE.— WEST FARMS. 



EDWARD MOSLEY DAMAGE. 

Paid L. S. Bliss, board horses and cash paid for 
help, 
H. P. Smith, repairing harness, 
Seth W. Kingsley, repairing wagon, 
Peter Pecor, care horses, 
J. R. Smith, services, 
Joseph Billings, cash paid, 
D. W. & H. H. Bond, professional services, 
A. W. Thompson, M. D., medical services, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Paid A. Williams & Co., Books, 

E' J. Cornwell, binding books, 
Bridgman & Childs, books, 



STATE AID. 



29 


95 


38 


79 


63 


74 


7 


80 



$198.03 



Paid Dennis Cooley, $ 7 00 

Leander Cooley, 63 00 



$70.00 



$102 


78 


16 


50 


15 


00 


18 


00 


7 


50 


10 


00 


42 


00 


25 


00 



$236 78 



$63 


52 


9 


85 


IS6 


70 



$230.07 



Paid Ruth Dennis, $96 00 

Minetva Anderson, 96 00 



Paid U. B. Graves, 
Clarissa Vining, 

TOWN AID, 

Paid U. B. Graves, 
Clarissa Vining, 

SCHOOLS. 

Paid Maria L. Tuttle, teaching and board, 
Jane M. Cowles, " " 

Mary C. Billings, . " " 

Mary E. Wells, 
Alihe L. Bartlett, 

Jane Nichols, " " 

Emma Rhood, " " 

J. R. Whitman, 
M.^A. P. Bishop, 

Clara Streeter, " " 

Eunice J. Morton, " " 

Henry S. Hubbard, wood and board, 
S. G. Hubbard, coal, 
Win. D, Clapp, " 
P. L. Strong & Sons, wood, 
R. H. Belden, 

Chas. M. Searle, sawing wood, 
Oscar Belden, " " 

Chas. Moore, services janitor, 
Theo. Chapin, " " 

Frank Dinsmore, " " 

Henry Cutter, " " 

James Porter, cash paid, 
Geo. A. Billings, cash paid, 
N. T. Abells, board, 
E. A. Bardwell, cash paid, 



96 00 

40 CO 
$328.00 



$34 


66 


34 


66 


$69 


•32 


$189 


CO 


296 


00 


3i4 


50 


120 


CO 


364 


00 


E02 


00 


241 


5° 


347 


00 


126 


00 


140 


00 


S3 


00 


2 


00 


93 


80 


11 


50 


30 


00 


54 50 


7 


5° 


6 


00 


8 


75 


25 


50 


8 


00 


4 


00 


15 


05 


n 


75 


4 


40 


2 


89 



$2519.64 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



We present to the town the following account of money 
expended by us for the repairing of Highways and Bridges 
the past year. We have exceeded the amount appropriated? 
on account of under estimating the cost of rebuilding the 
bridge near A. E. Strong's, and the unexpected repairs neces- 
sary on Pine Bridge, also the laying of four Stone Culverts 
in place of Wood. We think it will be necessary the present 
year, to rebuild one bridge south of Henry R. Graves', also 
one on the old Depot road, and the repairing or rebuilding of 
Pine Bridge. 

M. E. WARNER, ] Road Commissioners 

A. D. SWEET, I f 

LEANDER COOLEY, j Hatfield. 

Hatfield, March 8th, 1875. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid A. D. Sweet, labor and lumber, $538 15 

Moses E. Warner, labor, 35069 

Leander Cooley, " 154 40 

J. T. & G. C. Fitch, lumber, 113 36 

L. N. Granger, " 196 33 

Daniel W. Wells, " 97 17 

L. Mclntire, cement and pipe, 48 16 

J. G. Ward, flagging stone, 26 05 



II 



Paid Seth W. Kingsley, labor and material, 
A. J. Cutter, labor and earth, 
Lysander Chaffin, labor and stone, 
Fred Carl, •< 



Jacob Carl, 
Philip Carl, 
C. S. Chapman, 
Patrick Boyle, 
Henry Allard, 
Thos, Cutter, 
Moses W. Kingsley, 
Nelson Allair, 
A. E. Strong, 
E. S. Warner, 
Edward Proulx, 
H. H. Field, 
Jas. Bruor, 
John Chandler, 
Chas. Graves, 
Dennis Cooley, 
David Curtis, 
E. H. Field, 
Geo. Ritner, 
J. W. Field, 
Geo. W. Smith, 
Chas. Wolfram, 
H. Shumway, 
N. T. Abells, 
C.-B. Marsh, 
C. D. Bartlett, 
E. Brainard, 
John McHugh, 
Peter Pecor, 
L. S. Crafts, 
Henry Dwight, 
John O'Neil, 
Anthony Allair, Jr., 



labor, 



18 Si 

2 2 OO 

185 OO 

18 SO 
82 71 

44 29 

9 75 

6 56 
21 88 

7 05 

4 37 
6 00 

6 00 
54 25 

5 75 
*5 75 

4 37 

6 50 

11 00 

* 75 

7 75 
1 5 °° 

12 00 

3 5° 
14 85 

1 5° 
12 00 
27 50 

H 75 

10 00 

7 50 
10 62 

6 20 

2 00 
17 00 

5 00 

7 50 



12 



Paid Lewis Rabboin, 
Jas. Ryan, 
Wm. B. Langdon, 
Geo. Vollinger, 
S. S. Belden, 
C. N. Coleman, 
Peter Saffer, 
Chas. Carson, 
Chas. Wensel, 
Jos. Clistner, 
John Smith, 
John Ryan, 
Wm. Carson, 
R. H. Belden, 
C. B. Dickinson, 
David Powers, 
A. S. Jones, 
E. F. Cooley, 
Wm. Boyle, 
A. M. Peck, 
A. D. Dinsmore, 
O. Marsh, 
L. P. Dole, 
Nicholas Powers, 
Peter Pedlar, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, 
Elijah Bardwell, 
M. C. Porter, 
Israel Morton, 
C. K. Morton, 
Matthew Nolan, 
John Kiley, 
C. D. Bardwell, 
E. A. Bardwell, 
Jos. Stoddard, 



r 


00 


19 


75 


10 


00 


8 


00 


9 


00 


12 


CO 


14 


37 


4 


37 


3 


5o 


5 


75 


3 


5° 




88 


1 


00 


5i 


04 


2 


58 


5 


50 


8 


00 




87 


6 


00 


10 


25 


7 


00 


22 


25 


10 


5o 




66 




66 


8 


37 


4 33 


2 


50 




87 


7 


5° 


7 


5o 


4 


00 


3 


00 


18 


10 


1 


80 



$2516.12 



i 3 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid C. B. Kingley, soda and sulphuric acid, $ 44 78 

Star Printing Co., printing reports, order 

book, and stationery 54 20 

Public library for Boook cases, 105 00 

Benj. P. Dole, services as assessor and cash pd., 102 59 
Michael Larkin, " " " 33 75 

Henry G. Moore, " " " 33 75 

Joseph Billings, cash paid, 19 80 

Conn. River R„ R., freight, 1 40 

A. M. Peck, services sexton and returning 

deaths, 22 00 

A. E. Strong, cash paid, 4 10 

C. H. Brewster, paint and door for school 

house, 16 24 

Ezra White, posts and gate for cemetery, 15 00 

Chas. W. Marsh, labor cemetery West Farms, 4 00 

L. B. White, repairs school house, " " 16 30 

H. S. Hubbard, wood for town hall and 

library, 17 00 

D. W. Blcdgett, repairs school house West 

Farms, * 6 00 

L. S. Crafts, " " " West 

Brook, 35 50 

Reuben Belding, painting school house West 

Farms, 14 50 

Eames & Sprague, stove pipe, &c, for school 

houses and town hall, 115 18 

Jas. Porter, services school committee and 

cash paid, 65 00 

Geo. A. Billings, " " " " 

cash paid,, 59 06 

Oscar Belden, " - " •« " 

cash paid, 46 25 

W. D. Billings, services as clerk and cash 

paid express, 35 70 

W. D. Billings, recording and returning births, 

deaths and marriages, 37 So 



14 



Paid E. A. BardwelJ, services as treasurer &c, 
" " mdse. library and town hall, 

A. B. Loomis, flagging stone school house 

Dist. No. 2, 
Jo'hn McHugh, sawing wood, 
Joseph Marsh, for Dictionaries for schools, 



BILLS RECEIVABLE, 

Note and Interest John D, Brown, 
u " " Alvin Sanderson; 
" "i u D wight P. Morton, 



BILLS PAYABLE. 

Support of Oliver Bardwell, to March ist, 1875, 
; " Francis Abbot, ." 

Jane Stone & family " 
Catherine Tobin, 
" Pamelia Dickinson, " " '• 

" Nancy Morton, " " 

Services Selectmen 1874, 

" Constable, collector and librarian, 
Board of Tramps to March ist, 1875, 
Treasurer's Note Northampton Ins'n for Savings, 
" " Hampshire Savings Bank, 



3* 


00 


5 


04 


28 


00 


4 


5° 


20 


00 



$993.44 



241 


65 


144 


5° 


181 


52 



$567-67 



$3° 


00 


3° 


00 


35 


00 


3° 


00 


66 


00 


34 


00 


175 


00 


350 


00 


60 


00 


1975 


00 


1300 


00 


5^59 


00 



135 0o 



*5 



EEO^PITXJLA^TlOISr 



RECEIPTS. 



Bal. in hands of Treas. and Collector, Mar. 1874, $ 4,463 57 

Assessment Taxes for 1874, iOj475 °° 

Dog Fund 1873, 51 65 

National Bank Tax from State, 1720 10 

State Aid '" " 356 93 

Paupers " " 3 00 

Mass. School Fund " " 200 26 

Corporation Tax '•'".• " 109 12 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 6550 00 

Rent Town Hall, 11 00 

For Stone, , 2 00 

Interest on Taxes, 104 87 

$24,047 50 



i6 



EXPENDITURES 



Old bills, 
Paupers, 

Cemetery, Pantry, 
School House, u 

Dist. No. 2, 
Land Damage, 

Cash paid for Edward Mosley, 
Public Library, 
State Aid, 
Town " 
Schools, 

Highways and Bridges, 
Miscellaneous, 
State Tax, 
County " 
Discount on Taxes, 
Interest on Notes, 
Abatement on Taxes, 



Balance in hands of Treasurer and Collector, 



$ 646 


08 


; 1497 


17 


^3 8* 


154 


61 


198 


03 


70 


00 


6786 


78 


230 


07 


328 


00 


6 9 


32 


2 5 J 9 


64 


2516 


12 


993 


44 


2140 


00 


'974 


75 


298 


49 


184 


95 


3 1 


73 


$20,803 


03 


3 2 44 


47 


$24,047 


5° 



JOSEPH BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
A. E. STRONG, I of 

CHAS. L. WARNER, j Hatfield. 

E. A. BARDWELL, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 8th, 1875. 



*7 



THE MOSLEY DAMAGES. 



The Committee appointed by the Town for the settlement 
of claims of Edward Moseley, for damages from a defective 
bridge, report as follows : 

Paid Edward Moseley for personal damages, . ; 

Rockwell & Moseley, damages to property, 
L. S. Bliss, care of horses and cash paid, 
For sundry repairs, 
J. R. Smith for services, 
For legal and medical service, 

$6786.78 

WM. H. DICKINSON, ") 
SAMUEL P. BILLINGS, I 
AMARIAH H. STRONG, \ Committee. 
CHAS. L. WARNER, j 

JOSEPH BILLINGS, J 



$5250 


00 


1300 


00 


102 


73 


59 


5o 


7 


5o 


67 


00 



jS 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN 
MEETING MARCH 15, 1875. 



1st. — To choose a moderator to preside at said meeting. 

2d. — To choose all necessary town officers for the year ensuing, including one 
person for member of the School Committee for three years. Also 
one person for Road Commissioner for three years. 

3 J. — To choose an Elector under the will of the late Oliver Smith. 

4th. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors submitted by the Selectmen. 

5th. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, School Committee, Road Commis- 
sioners and Library Committee, and act thereon. 

8th. — To receive arid pass on town accounts. 

7th. — To see if the town will abolish the Board of Road Commissioners. 

8th.— To see what method the town will adopt for the maintainance and repairs 
of Highways and Bridges. 

9th. — To take action in relation to raising money to defray the necessary ex- 
penses of the town for the ensuing year. 

10th.— To see it' the town will make an appropriation for the Public Library the 
ensuing year, and choose a committee for the same. 

11th.— To see if the town will raise money for decoration purposes. 

12th. — To see what action the town will take in relation to the prompt payment 
of taxes the ensuing y^ar. 

13th. — To see what action the town will take in regard to a petition of L. L. 
Draper to an abatement of taxes. 

14th. — To see what action the town will take in regard to a claim of Elihu 
Marsh, for damages resulting from a defect in the highway. 

15th. — To see if the town will insure its public buildings. 

16th. — To see If the town will assume a part of the expense for the Bell re- 
cently purchased by the First Parish. 

17th. — To see if the town will procure Hooks and Ladders for use in case of 
fire, and raise money for the same. 

18th.— To see if the town will build a Receiving Tomb, and raise money for the 
same. 

19th. — To see if the town will rebuild the school house at West Farms, and 
raise money for the same. 

20th. — To see if the town will raise money to pay outstanding debts of the town. 



19 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE 
SELECTMEN. 



W. I. Bishop, 
Philip Carl, 
A. E. Strong, 
Danl. A. Vining, 
Chas. Wells, 
E. H. Belden, 
Henry G. Moore, 



Chas. L. Graves, 
Sam 'IE. "Witherell, 
Chas. K. Morton, 
Henry L. Waite, 
Sam'l P. Billings, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, 
Daniel W. Wells, 
F. D. Billings, 



Rufus Cowles, 
Alfred H. Graves, 
W. D. Billings, 
Roswell Hubbard, 
S. G. Hubbard, 
Eurotas Morton, 
Edwin W. Field. 



.Appropriations, ±874: 



Schools, 

Highways and Bridges, 

Paupers, 

Town Aid, 

Repairs School House, Pantry, 
" Cemetery, " 

*' School House, Dist. No. 

Public Library, 

Damages Edward Mosley, 

Contingencies, 



pooo oo 

2000 oo 

1500 00 

70 00 

150 00 

150 00 

200 00 

250 00 

i45i 73 
1300 00 



&EPOET OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



At the last annual meeting, the town voted their money for 
Schools in accordance with the provisions of the Statute, 
namely : that school money shall be used for the payment of 
teachers including board, fuel, care of fires, and school rooms : 
leaving the unexpended school money, to be used by the com- 
mittee as a part of the funds for the year following. 

March 1874, the town voted the sum of two thousand dol- 
lars for school purposes. 

Accoiding to the Selectmen's report, the amount of unex- 
pended school money in the Treasury, was five hundred 
eighty three dollars and seventy five cents. 

The amount received from the State School Fund, two 
hundred and six dollars. Making exclusive of the dog fund 
which was voted to be appropriated to schools, two thousand 
seven hundred and eighty nine dollars and seventy five cents. 

$2,789.75. 

Your Committee have endeavoured to procure such teachers 

as would give to the children of the town, the best returns 

for money expended. We are glad to report that our schools 

with hardly an exception, have been a decided success. 

Teachers who have been continued in our schools, have 

labored with the same untiring zeal, and consequently secured 

such success as gives your committee pleasure to commend. 

Some having commenced, while others having renewed their 

work afresh in our schools, have created a stimulus too mark- 



2^ 



ed to be passed by unnoticed, the results of which have been 
favorable, in interest awakened : the schools at West Brooks 
and West Hatfield, close with a long stride in advance of 
where. they were one year ago. 

There is the same need of educating many of our 
parents to the importance of looking to the punctuality and 
constancy in attendance, on the part of their children, from 
the commencement of the first day of each term, through 
all the intervening days to the close, but as it may seem like 
following in the old ruts to bring up this subject again, we 
will satisfy ourselves with alluding to this fault, of so long 
standing; hoping, that keeping this subject before the people, 
wnll effect some improvement, at least 

The importance of continuing the same teachers in the same 
school. The subject of Drawing, as practiced already, and 
what it may be in the future, as a prescribed study. The rela- 
tions of parents to their children in school, have been pretty 
thoroughly discussed in former reports, and still we say to 
parents : manifest an interest in the schools, — not only in 
words outside the school room, but by your presence inside. 
There is too much inclination on the part ot all to act as 
though it was intruding, to enter a school room in school 
hours. Teachers feel the need of sympathy in their 
work on the part of parents, and scholars receive an 
increased stimulus and confidence in demeanor by repeated 
manifestations of personal interest. That can be shown in 
no better way than by seeing them at their work. 

In years past, old school houses, and the building of new 
ones; the encroachment that ill-ventilated, incommodious 
rooms were making upon the health, and the probable length 
of life of our children, were subjects for the pen of school 
committees. Now we have but little occasion in this line to 
spin out a report, unless it be how we may make comfortably 
warm our more spacious rooms; save where the fiery ele- 
ment has taken things into its own hands, and laid low our 
labor and design. Consequently, the town will be obliged 
to make an appropriation for a new building at West Farms, 



22 



By vote of the town at our last annual meeting, the School 
Committee were directed to complete the grading and build 
a fence around the grounds of the center school house. The 
town raised the sum of two hundred dollars for this purpose. 
Your committee have attended to their duty and have en- 
deavored to put the fence and grounds in such shape as was 
expressed by the action of the town, the expense of which 
amounted to $198.03. 

All who have been coiversant with the center school build- 
ing, must have noticed that the portico was in bad condition,, 
caused by the action of frost upon the foundation of the .pil- 
lars. In order that it might be remedied, two large flag 
stones were procured, which, with suitable foundation stone 
beneath, has removed the difficulty. 

As the statute prescribes that twenty-five per cent of what 
is received from the State school fund may be used by the 
committee for books of reference, map's and apparatus, we 
have, in accordance with this provision, used the sum of 
twenty dollars and sixty-four cents. 



No. of children in town, according to the assessors' returns, between 

five and fifteen years of age, . . > 304 

No. reported last year . BOO 

No. of children that have attended school, . . . 284 

14 " over fifteen, " " . . . 13 

" . " under five, ",."."'. . • ? 

No. of different teachers employed, . . . 12 



23 



Names of Teachers and Wages per Month, Including Board, with 
Amount Received. 



Hill Gram V. . .Maria L. Tuttle, Sum. and Fall, 

Hill Prim. . Jane M. Cowley 

I Mary E. Wells, Summer, 

Center Oram. < Eunice Morton, Fall, 

( Clara Streeter, Winter, 

Center Prim Mary C. Billings, Summer, Fall & Win. 

West Farms Alice L. Bartlette, " " " 

West Brook Jessie R. Whitman, Summer and Fall, 

" "■ Winter, 

( Jennie E. Nichols, Summer, 

West Hatfield. -( Emma Rhood Fall, 

( Mrs Mary A. P. Bishop,. Winter, 

Amount expended for Teachers, including board, fuel, and care of 

school room, with apparatus, ....-» $2519 64 

Amount raised for Schools by Tax, 2000 00 

Amount of unexpendsd School money in Treasury March, 1874, 583 75 

Received from State School Fund, 206 00 

Amount clue from the Dog Fund, 

JAMES PORTER, ) School Committee 

OSCAR BELDEN, \ of the 

GEORGE A.BILLINGS, J Town of Hatfield 



$36 00 


$189 00 


32 00 


296 00 


40 00 


120 00 


32 00 


88 00 


40 00 


140 00 


34 00 


314 00 


32 00 


264 00 


36 00 




40 00 


347 00 


34 00 


102 00 


36 00 


99 00 


36 00 


126 00 



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REPORTS 



OF 



THE SELECTMEN 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OP THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 7, 1876. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS.: 

STEAM PRESS OP GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY. 

1876. 



Selectmen's Report 



In compliance with law and custom, the Selectmen again pre- 
sent to the voters and citizens of the town of Hatfield their an- 
nual report. 

Beginning the year with a realizing sense of the " hard times/' 
we have endeavored to economize and retrench wherever and 
whenever it has been in our power to so do. Notwithstanding, 
in some departments we have exceeded the appropriations made 
at the annual meeting, as in case of expenditures for the 

POOR. 

These we have always with us. How much more, then, may 
we expect to be called upon for aid, when we take into considera- 
tion the present financial condition of the country. Business 
depressed, demand for labor scarce, need we wonder that there 
should be an increasing demand upon the towns and cities of the 
Commonwealth for help? And so has it been with us. In some 
cases, calls for temporary aid, in others, for full support. We 
mention here the cases of Oliver Vining and family. We found 
him prostrate, in the last stages of consumption, his family des- 
titute. For them we provided food, medical care, and nurses, 
until his death. Since then his family have cared for them- 
selves. Wm. Jenkins, no settlement in this State, sick with 
typhoid fever ; Kobert Eeardon, sick with pneumonia, also a 
State pauper. For expense on account of the two last we expect 
to be remunerated by the State. 

Have buried, within the year, three persons, Pamelia Dickin- 
son, Nancy Morton, and child of Christian Schroeder. The two 
first are the last of those persons who have been so long supported 



by the town, and as a considerable portion of the annual appro- 
priation has been expended for these, it will be seen that for the 
coming year our expense for the poor will be greatly reduced, 
other things being equal. 

Our expense for that class of paupers known as " tramps," 
exceeds that of last year, notwithstanding we have made arrange- 
ments so that the cost per head has been considerably reduced. 
The number this year has been 429, against 160 last year. For 
the first month we paid 75 cents, and since, 50 cents per head, so 
that the entire cost of keeping these people has been $224.35. 
We believe it to be. an open question whether or not it would be 
policy for the town to build a lock-up for their accommo- 
dation. It certainly would be, if the numbers are to increase 
during the coming year as they have in the past. In 1875, the 
Legislature passed an act authorizing the town authorities to 
compel these tramps to work a certain length of time every day, 
but that seems to be of no avail to us, as we have nothing that 
they can do with profit to the town. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

At your last annual meeting, the board of Eoad Commissioners 
was abolished, and the repairs of highways and bridges placed 
into the hands of six surveyors, with the exception of repairs of 
bridges exceeding the cost of $20, which was left to the se- 
lectmen, a plan somewhat similar to that adopted some years 
ago. We believe this has operated successfully, and, so far as 
we know, satisfactorily. 

We report the roads and bridges to be in good condition, with 
one or two exceptions, viz. : two bridges at Middle Going Over, 
so called. These will need some repairs soon. 

We believe that some reductions may be made in the appro- 
priation for repairs for the coming year, from that of last, and 
would recommend that the same method be adopted. 

HOOKS AND LADDERS. 

At the annual meeting you appropriated $250 for the purchase 
of hooks and ladders for use in case of fire, instructing the select- 
men to expend the same, This we have done, and in each 



• 5 

school district have placed two ladders, one twenty-five and one 
eighteen feet in length ; also, three hand hooks, and one large 
hook with rope and chain attached. Have also procured new 
hose for the Hydraulic Engine. The hooks and ladders are 
placed as follows: 

Hill District, at School House. 

South Centre District, premises D. W. Wells. 

North " " " C. D. Bardwell. 

"West Farms " *' Oscar Belden. 

West Brook ?' " Daniel Vining. 

Pantry " " A. E. Strong. 

We have also a forty feet ladder, which may be found on the 
premises of D. W. Wells. 

INSURANCE. 

We have carried out our instructions in regard to the insurance 
of public buildings, and at present they stand insured as follows: 
Town Hall, $2,000 

School House, Centre, 6,000 

" Hill, 3,000 

" West Farms, m 3,000 

" Pantry, 800 

" West Brook, 1,000 

The aggregate cost has been $264.00. The new policies are all 
for five years, and all in stock companies. 

CLAIMS OF ELIHU MARSH. 

At the last annual meeting, the matter of claims of Elihu 
Marsh, for damages on highway, was referred to the selectmen. 
We h&ve carefully investigated the case, and, in view of the 
facts, would recommend that the town take no action in regard 
to the matter. 

We present to you herewith a statement in detail of our dis- 
bursements for the year ending March 1st, 1876. We hoped 
that all bills and claims against the town would be presented on 
or before that time. We believe, however, that there are some 
that have not been brought in. We would here say to all those 
interested, that if they would present their claims before the 
close of the financial year, it would enable the selectmen to pre- 



sent a more accurate report, and give the people a clearer insight 
as to the actual expenses of the town. 

Our liabilities at the present time consist of notes held by the 
Savings Banks in Northampton, amounting to $8,525.00, and 
outstanding bills to about $500.00. Total, $9,025.00. To offset 
this, we find in the hands of the Treasurer and Collector assets 
amounting to $4,787.69, leaving a balance of $4,237.31 as the 
indebtedness of the town. 

SUMMARY, 

Notes in Savings Banks, $8,525 00 

Outstanding Bills, 500 00 

$9,025 00 



In hands of Collector and Treasurer, $4, 185 05 

Demand Notes and Interest, 602 64 



4,787 69 
Indebtedness of the Town, $4,237 31 



EXPENDITURES. 



PAID OLD BILLS. 

Adam Doppman, labor highway, $13 00 

Philip Jubenville, " 8 71 

M. E. Warner, " 14 00 

Leander Cooley, " " 9 25 

H. Shumway, " " 17 50 

Frank Prince, " " ' 2 25 

S. W. Kingsley, " and material, 17 91 

Board Pamelia Dickinson, 66 00 

" Nancy Morton, 33 00 

" Francis Abbott, 33 00 

" Catherine Tobin, 31 56 

" Oliver Bardwell, 36 34 

" Tramps, 67 00 

L. S. Crafts, care watering tank, 5 00 

J. E. Wight, care cemetery, West Farms, 5 00 



A. E. Strong, services selectman, $35 00 

Ohas. L. Warner, " " 26 00 

Jos. Billings, " " 120 00 

Support Jane Stone and family, 28 50 

" Lewis Beaugor and family, 4 41 

Thos. Fitzgerald, 10 00 

C. M. Barton, M. D., med. ser. family Sela Wheeler, 15 00 

Hosea Wheeler, 15 50 
" Thos. Fitzgerald, 16 75 
« John Fitzgerald, 2 00 
" Catherine Tobin, 2 00 
med. ser. Pamelia Dickinson, 8 00 
G. A. Pierce, M. D., med. ser. removing John Fitzger- 
ald and Catherine Tobin to Insane Asylum, 12 00 
W. H. Todd & Co., lock for Town Hall, 2 75 
Horace Shumway, drawing coal, 8 50 
Dwight Dickinson, damage on highway, 3 75 
Myron Harwood, M. D., med. ser. Ashley Wheeler, 16 00 
L. S. Crafts, sawing wood, 6 75 



C. L. Knowlton, M. D. 



PAID STATE AID. 



Mrs. Euth Dennis, 
" Minerva Anderson, 
" Clara Vining, 
" IT. B. Graves, 



PAID TOWN AID. 



Mrs. U. B. Graves, 
" Clara Vining, 



$692 43 


88 


00 


92 


00 


48 


00 


20 00 


$248 00 


34 


66 


34 


66 



$69 32 



PAID FOE HIGHWAYS AND BEIDGES. 



Chester W. White, building bridges, West Brook, $118 00 

Chas. N. Coleman, repairing Pine Bridge, 40 00 

Moses E. Warner, building bridge, Fitch's Mill, 50 00 

" " " labor, 11 00 

L. N. Granger, lumber, 34 85 



8 

Edward 0. Waite, lumber, $22 00 

" " " labor, 8 52 

Alvin Sanderson, services surveyor, 50 00 

labor, 42 55 

Edwin Brainerd, services surveyor, 34 85 

" " labor, 27 70 

A. J. Cutter, services surveyor, 40 00 

" " " labor, 38 00 

Chas. L. Graves, services surveyor, 38 30 

' " " " labor, ' 13 62 

Henry G. Moore, services surveyor, 34 31 

" " " lumber, 13 00 

John Fitzgibbons, services surveyor, 40 00 

labor, 61 44 

27 10 

1 50 
3 00 
5 50 
7 75 

12 35 
26 15 

3 75 

11 50 
7 50 

13 00 

5 50 
9 40 

7 75 
20 50 

2 73 

6 75 

8 25 

2 50 
75 

9 50 
5 50 

4 00 

12 75 

3 00 

4 72 



Frank Prince, 


a 


Patrick Doolan, 


a 


Otis C. Wells, 


a 


D. W. Wells, 


a 


L. G. Curtis, 


a 


John O'Neil, 


a 


J. D. Billings, 


a 


David Billings, 


a 


Jos. Billings, 


a 


Mack Lamountain 


, earth, 


E. Hubbard, 


labor, 


S. G. Hubbard, 


a 


M. N. Hubbard, 


<( 


C. E. Hubbard, 


a 


H. S. Hubbard, 


a 


" " " lumber, 


J. D. Porter, 


labor, 


Edward Proulx, 


a 


Adam Doppman, 


a 


A. M. Peck, 


a 


Leander Cooley, 


a 


Henry E. Graves, 


a 


Fred Carl, 


a 


Philip Carl, 


a 


Luman Moore, 


a 


Edwin Kingsley, 


(< 



John Ryan, labor, 

Ohas. Wilkie, 

M. P. Bradford, 

Elihu Marsh, 

Anthony Allair, Jr., " 

Oliver Goodchild, 

Wm. Boyle, 

Peter Pecor, " 

N. T. Abells, " and tile, 

A. E. Strong, . " 

Henry Wade, " 

S. W. Kingsley, " and material, 

Lewis Rabboin, (i 

John McHugh, " 

Peter Rosebush, " 

Wm. Kaiser, ii 

George Smith, " 

H. F. Bardwell, 

John St. Peter, 

Michael Larkin, " 

L. S. Bliss, 

Wm. P. Allis, 

Jas. Ryan, " 

Jas. Porter, " 

George Vollinger, " 

W. B. Russell, 

Jas. Nolan, " 

Thos. Cutter, 

Chas. L. Oowles, " 

C. D. Bardwell, 

F. D. Billings, 

Ohas. Kingsley, " 

Israel Morton, " 

Mrs. J. T. Fitch, " 

Francis Teru, " 

M. C. Porter, 

J. D. Brown, 

Patrick Mullaney, " 

James Ryan, " 

Geo'. W. Fitch, 



$9 65 


9 


00 


3 


00 


7 00 


6 


60 


8 


40 


10 


00 


5 


24 


6 


02 


15 


50 


3 


00 


25 


65 


2 


68 


5 


10 


1 


50 


1 


35 




90 


7 


61 


3 


00 


2 


75 


3 


37 


11 


00 


9 


10 


6 


00 


1 


41 


1 


50 


2 


88 


4 50 


4 


13 


2 


75 


1 


95 


3 


00 


1 


50 


12 


89 


4 50 


5 


50 


12 20 


1 


55 


1 


50 


14 19 



10 



Geo. W. Fitch lumber, 

Geo. L. Marsh, labor, 

Chas. K. Morton, 

L. Vollinger, " 

John Batzhold, " 

E. A. Bard well, 

(( " " material, 

Michael Clancy, labor, 

Matthew Nolan, " 

Wm. H. Dickinson, " 

J. G. Ward, stone, 

I). F. Morton, stone and timber, 

Henry D wight, labor, 

E. M. Martin, merchandise, 

Henry G. Moore, cash paid, 

Erastus Billings, labor, 

0. S. Graves, 

Sanford Sanderson, " 

R. H. Belden, 

Oscar Belden, " 

A. S. Jones, " 

Francis Mosher, " 

Enrotus Morton, " 

Eleazer Oooley, " 

Dennis Cooley, " 

John W. Field, 

H. H. Field, 

E. W. Field, 



$93 52 



7 


68 


4 00 




67 


1 


34 


9 


36 


4 32 


3 


00 


1 


20 


22 


00 


7 40 


7 


00 


3 


00 


1 


75 


1 


85 


5 


50 


4 


65 


2 


25 


2 


00 


3 


00 


13 


75 


2 


00 


11 


80 


3 


50 


5 


50 


1 


37 


2 


87 


3 


45 



,419 94 



PAID FOR SCHOOLS. 



Edward C. Waite, wood, 
P. L. Strong & Sons, " 
Horace Waite, 

H. S. Hubbard, " and coal, 

" " " cash' paid, 

C. G. & F. A. Crafts, coal, 
Geo. A. Billings, 
" (i " cash paid, 



$15 00 
60 00 
19 00 
63 50 
17 25 
27 18 

111 63 
1*2 90 



11 



L. Mclntire, coal, 

George Graves, services janitor, 

Wm. L. Burt, " 

Geo. Graves, " " 

Jos. Gilbert, sawing wood, 

Erastus Strong, " " 

David Powers, " " 

J. R. Whitman, teaching and board, 

Helen M. Nash, 

Mary C. Billings, " and board, 

A. P. Bishop, 

Jane M. Cowles, 

Martha Gardner, 

Hattie 0. Billings, 

Clara Streeter, 

Ruth E. Abells, 

Mrs. 0. W. Billings, board, 

Albert Marsh, " 

H. W. Field, 

E. A. Bardwell, merchandise, 

Jane M. Cowles, teaching and board, 

Oscar Relden, cash paid, 

Wm. Burt, services janitor, 

Myron Porter, " " 

Ruth E. Abells, teaching and board, 

Clara Streeter, " " " 

Mary C. Billings, 

Geo. A. Billings, cash paid, 

Henry Cutter, services janitor, 



PAID FOR PAUPERS. 



$14 


14 


8 


25 


4 50 


7 


50 


5 


50 


7 50 


12 


00 


349 


00 


98 


40 


195 


50 


108 


00 


195 


50 


220 


50 


102 


00 


182 


00 


99 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


50 


00 


12 


80 


119 


00 


22 


25 


10 


50 


17 


50 


126 


00 


140 


00 


119 


00 


• 2 


18 


5 


00 



$2,655 98 



Support Pamelia Dickinson, 

" Nancy Morton, 

" Jane Stone and family, 

" Francis Abbott, 

" Oliver Bardwell, 

" Catherine Tobin, 

" Oliver Vining and family, 



$203 00 
193 00 
211 55 
165 31 
169 16 
122 72 
174 27 



12 

Thos. Cutter, support tramps, 

N. P. Gould, 

Support Lewis Beaugor and family, 

" Christian Schroeder and family, 

" Cynthia Remington, 

" Henry Minke and family, 

" Buckley children, 

" Mrs. Joseph Richards, 
George Hathaway, clothing, 

Anderson, 

C. M. Barton, M. D., medical services^ Geo. H. Pierce, 
Lewis Goodchild, provision for Lewis Beaugor, 
Joseph Billings, cash paid for paupers, 
Board and care Wm. Jenkins, 
Board and clothing for Lewis Covill, 
Chas. L. Warner, cash paid tramp, 
A. M. Peck, services sexton, 
Support Robert Reardon, 

" Lewis Beaugor. 

" Christian Schroeder, 



$66 


50 


157 


85 


28 


01 


27 


49 


34 


92 


8 


75 


10 


00 


5 


00 


4 50 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


60 


7 


50 


58 


00 


54 


00 


1 


50 


8 


00 


16 


50 


11 


00 


10 


00 



$1,757 13 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Edward C. Waite, wood for Town Hall, $14 00 

Theo. Porter, sawing wood for Town Hall, 2 00 

Peck & Pierce, insurance, 264 00 

L. S. Crafts, repairs school house, West Brook, 5 00 

Star Printing Co., for reports and order book, 50 87 

Dexter Jones, repairs Engine House and Town Hall, 3 75 

D. W. Wells, services assessor, 43 00 

J. 1). Porter, " " • 31 25 

W. D. Billings, " " 47 50 

" " " cash paid for assessors, 4 50 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 5 00 

Chas. W. Marsh, care cemetery, West Farms, 5 00 

A. M. Peck, " « 14 75 

" " " returning deaths, 9 50 

" " " repairs hearse, 1 50 

C. H. Jones, repairs Town Hall and school house, 9 00 



13 

D. W. & H. H. Bond, legal services selectmen, $33 00 
" " " " " " school house building commit- 
tee, West Farms, 

Trumbull & Gere, for posters, 

H. S. Hubbard, repairs school house, 

Mrs. J. T, Fitch, box for hooks and ladders, 

E. A. Bardwell, services treasurer and constable, 
"-*■" " cash paid stationery, 
" " " merchandise for library, 
Joseph Billings, expense N. Y. and Springfield, 
Joseph Billings, cash paid, sundries, 
S. D. Porter, services surveyor, 
E. A. Stockbridge, care watering tank, 
A. S. Jones & Son, rent for school room, 
Oscar Belden, freight for desks for school house, 
Mrs. John Leary, cleaning school house, 
James Porter, cash paid clerk board of electors, . 
George A. Billings, services school committee, 
Henry S. Hubbard, repairs school house, 
Oscar Belden, services school committee, 
George A. Billings, services school committee, 
W. D. Billings, ser. clerk, cash, express and postage, 

" recording and returning births, deaths 
and marriages, 

$833 83 

PAID FOR FIRE HOOKS AND LADDERS. 

0. E. Hartshorn, fire hooks, 
Homer Foote & Co. , rope, 
Conn. River R. R. Co., freight, 
J. D. Norton & Sons, ladders, 
A. M. Ball, hose for fire engine, 



PAID FOR PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

E. J. Cornwell, books and binding books, 
Bridgman & Child s, books, 



5 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


3 


00 


29 


00 


3 


00 


1 


85 


22 


50 


8 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


23 


61 


6 


00 


2 


00 


27 


25 


6 


00 


30 


00 


15 


00 


30 


00 


32 


00 



$132 00 


21 23 


1 09 


92 00 


21 00 


$267 32 


$25 42 


164 20 


17 75 



$207 37 



14 

PAID FOE SCHOOL HOUSE, WEST FARMS. 

Lysander Chaffin, labor, $170 00 

A. S. Jones, building committee, 2,999 00 

Oscar Belden, " " 765 00 

Elihu Marsh, board, 65 00— $3,999 00 

PAID FIRST PARISH. 
D. W. Wells, treasurer, for bell, $350 00 

BILLS RECEIVABLE. 

Note and interest, John D. Brown, $257 00 

Alvin Sanderson, 153 25 

D. P. Morton, 192 39— $602 64 






BILLS PAYABLE. 

Treas. Note, Hampshire Savings Bank, $5,250 00 

" " " " " 1,300 00 

" Northampton " " 1,975 00 

Outstanding Bills, 500 00— $9,025 00 



RECAPITULATION. 
RECEIPTS, 1875. 



Anthony Allair, Jr., license, 


$75 00 


H. S. Gere, dog fund, 1874, 


77 24 


Corporation tax, 


77 16 


State aid, 


386 14 


Bank tax, 


2,377 89 


School fund, 


210 95 


Paupers, received from State, 


18 00 


Rent Town Hall, 


7 00 


Estate Nancy Morton, 


12 01 


" Pamelia Dickinson, 


40 85 


Balance in hands collector and treasurer, 




March, 1875, 


3,244 47 


Assessment taxes for 1875, 


15,315 76 


Interest on taxes, received from E. A. 




Bardwell, 


28 74 


Received from town treasurer, 


7 50 


H. S. Gere, dog fund, 1826, 


86 70— $21,965 41 



IS 



EXPENDITURES, 1875. 



Old bills, 


$714 88 


Paupers, 


1,757 13 


Public Library, 


207 37 


'State aid, ' 


248 00 


Town " 


69 32 


Schools, 


2,655 98 


Highways and bridges, 


1,419 93 


Miscellaneous, 


833 84 


State tax, 


2,140 00 


County tax, 


2,003 13 


Discount on taxes, 


456 79 


Interest on notes, 


530 16 


State Treas., one fourth liquor license fees, 


18 75 


a a err0 r bank tax, 1874, 


20 92 


School House, West Farms, 


3,999 00 


Fire hooks and ladders, 


267 32 


Assessors order of abatement, 


88 84 


First Parish, for bell, 


350 00 




$17,781 36 


Balance in hands of treasurer and collector, 


4,185 05 




$21,966 41 



JOSEPH BILLINGS, ) Selectmen 
A. E. STRONG, [ of 

CHAS. L. WARNER, ) Hatfield. 

E. A. BARD WELL, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 1st, 1876. 



16 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 20th, 1876. 

Article 1st. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2kd. To choose all necessary town officers for the year 
ensuing, including one person for member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3rd. To choose an Elector under the will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4th. To revise and accept the list of Jurors, as sub- 
mitted by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5th. To hear the reports of the Selectmen and School 
Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6th. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7th. To take action in relation to raising money to de- 
fray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8th. To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintenance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 9th. To see if the town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library the ensuing year, and choose a Committee 
for the same. 

Art. 10th. To see what action the town will take in relation 
to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 11th. To see if the town will raise money to pay the 
outstanding debts of the town. 

Art. 12th. To see if the town will abate certain taxes com- 
mitted to E. F. Billings for collection. 



17 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 



Charles Wells, 
Dan'l A. Virring, 
Edwin W. Field, 
Dan'l W. Wells, 
W. D. Billings, 
F. D. Billings, 
Rufus Cowles, 
Henry L. Waite, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, 
Chas. L. Graves, 
Sam'l P. Billings, 



Roswell Hubbard, 
Philip Carl, 
R. H. Belden, 
Chas. Wilkie, 
P. L. Strong, 
J. E. Wight, 
Leander Cooley, 
M. E. Warner, 
J. D. Porter, 
Elisha Hubbard, 
Chas. N. Coleman. 



APPROPRIATIONS, 1875. 



School House, West Farms, 

Schools, 

Town debt, 

Paupers, 

Highways and bridges, 

Contingencies, 

First Parish, 

Public Library, 

Fire hooks and ladders, 

Town aid, 



$3,999 


00 


2,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


1,600 


00 


1,500 


00 


1,000 


oo 


350 


00 


250 


00 


250 


oo 


70 


00 


$13,019 


oo 



School Committee's Report. 



The Town voted $2,000 for the support of Schools the past 
year. In addition to this sum, there was an unexpended balance 
In the treasury of $270.11 ; $210.95 has been received from the 
State School Fund ; the Dog Fund for the years 1873 and 1874, 
$128.89— all making the sum of $2,609.95. 

In presenting a report of the Schools of this town, we feel 
warranted in stating that an average degree of prosperity has 
been attained the past year. The number of Schools has been 
the same as in previous years. There has been little change of 
teachers, nine being the whole number employed. Of these, five 
have been retained throughout the year, four of them in the same 
school. All have seemed to manifest an interest in their work, 
and labored faithfully. 

The amount of money paid to teachers and for board, varies 
but little from last year's report. Fuel has cost $130 more than 
last year, owing to the larger amount of coal used in the furnace 
at the Center School house, and bills paid for wood, that did not 
properly belong to the current expenses of the year. These bills, 
with other small items, have increased the cost of our schools a 
small sum above the appropriation, a fact we were not aware of 
until the final summing up of accounts. For the school at the 
Farms the Summer and Fall terms, we were obliged to use a 
small, inconvenient room, and the scholars, of course, labored 
under many disadvantages. The Winter term did not commence 
until December 20th, the new house not being ready for occu- 
pancy before that time. 

While we speak of the schools as comparing f aborably with for- 
mer years, we are aware that it is possible that a much higher 
standard of excellence might be attained. The one great draw- 
hack to their progress is a general lack of interest on the part of 
parents. They do not encourage the school by their presence, or 



19 

see that their children make the best use of its privileges. This 
is the prime cause of the great number of absent and tardy 
marks seen on the Registers. Children are not able to compre- 
hend the importance of always being present and in season. It 
is the parents' duty to see to that, and teach the good, wholesome 
lesson of punctuality. This fault has been ably set forth in 
previous reports, and we believe it should be in all future reports, 
until it is in some measure remedied, and the scholars in town 
receive the full benefit of the money expended for their edu- 
cation. 

A new school building has been erected at the Farms the past 
season ; $3,999 was voted by the town, for this purpose, at the last 
annual spring meeting. In addition to this sum, $1,000 in mon- 
ey and work has been contributed by the people of the district, 
to build and furnish a hall in said building, that might be 
used for various purposes to meet the wants of the neighborhood. 
The School Committee were obliged to assume the responsibility 
of furnishing the school room, the appropriation in the hands of 
the Building Committee being already exhausted. The cost of 
furniture was $223. 

As a town we are well supplied with good, substantial school 
buildings, which is an important feature in the foundation of 
good schools, and which calls for more vigilance in the care of 
them than has before been given, that they be not defaced or 
•damaged in any way. While this comes within the sphere of 
School Committee's duties, every citizen has a right, and should 
not fail to call attention to any thing wrong discovered about the 
school premises. Repairs on school houses is yearly a large item 
in town expenses, which ought to be, in a large measure, dispensed 
with. The present time calls for an economy that shall keep 
intact what property we have, and to receive an equivalent for 
every dollar expended either for public or private good. 

Number of children in town, according to the assessors' re- 
turns, between five and fifteen years of age, 311 
No. reported last year, 304 
".No. of children that have attended school, 299 



20 



NAMES OF TEACHERS AND WAGES PER MONTH. 

Hill Grammar, Hattie C. Billings, summer, $34 00 

J. R. Whitman, fall, 36 00 

" " J. K. Whitman, winter, 40 00 

Hill Primary, Jane M. Cowles, 34 00' 

Center Grammar, Clara Streeter, 40 00 

Center Primary, Mary C. Billings, 34 00 

West Farms/ Ellen M. Nash, 32 00 

West Brook, J. R. Whitman, summer, 40 00 

" " Martha Gardner, fall and winter, 36 00 

West Hatfield, Mrs. Mary A. P. Bishop, summer, 36 00 

"■ Mrs. Ruth E. Abells, fall and winter, 36 00 

Amount expended for Teachers, including board, fuel, care 

of school rooms, with apparatus, 2,655 00 

Amount raised for Schools by tax, 2,000 00 
Amount of unexpended school money in treasury, 

March, 1875, 270 11 

Received from State School Fund, 210 95 

Received from Dog Fund for the years 1873 and 1874, 128 89 



GEORGE A. BILLINGS, 
HENBY S. HUBBARD, 
OSCAR BELDEN, 



School Committee 

of the 
Town of Hatfield. 





Length of 


Whole No. 


Average at- 


No. of 


No. of 




school in 


of schol- 


tendance in 


children 


children 




weeks. 


ars in each 


each school. 


under five 


over fif- 






school. 




years of 
age. 


teen years 
of age. 


SCHOOLS. 


































u 

03 




u 


© 




u 






u 


© 




u 


© 




ti 




a 




© 


a 




© 


a 




© 


a 




© 


a 




© 




ti 


r* 


a 


H 


j3 


a 


a 


jjj 


a 


a 


^ 


a 


fl 


<—\ 


a 




S 
w 


ft 


& 


3 


03 
ft 


£ 


3 
02 


ft 


U 


s 


ft 


% 


3 
02 


ft 


& 


Hill Grammar . . 


12 


11 


13 


33 


31 


33 


23 


23} 


26} 








1 






Hill Primary . . . 


12 


11 


14 


52 


54 


42 


41 23 


42 3 2 


33 33 


3 


4 










Centre Grammar 


12 


11 


14 


37 


32 


44 


30 


26 










1 




6 


Centre Primary. 


12 


11 


14 


61 


55 


47 


47 


4.4.5 


3« 


3 










1 


West Farms .... 


12 


13 


14 


23 


19 


26 


16! 


15} 










1 




3 


West Brook .... 


12 


10} 


14 


30 


33 


38 


23 


23 


31 












4 


West Hatfield.. 


12 


11 


14 


30 


38 


43 


24 


29} 


35 


1 


1 











REPORTS 



OF THE 



3B21L>lE<D r FM3E2I^ 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year Ending March 1, 1877, 



NORTHAMPTON : 
STEAM PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY. 

1877. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield, the Selectmen 
thereof respectfully present their Eeport for the year ending 
March 1st, 1877. 

THE POOR. 

For the relief of the poor, we have somewhat exceeded the 
appropriation ($1,200). The reason is obvious — hard times. 
You will observe, however, that the Treasurer gives us credit 
for $45.00, received from the State and from the town of 
Northampton. We still have a claim upon the town of North- 
ampton for $88.00 for aid rendered to William Hayes, who was 
sick in this town, but who, we believe, has a settlement there. 

We are now supporting, in the Insane Asylum, Northampton, 
Francis Abbott and Allen M. Richmond, the latter coming upon 
the town within the year (May 1, 1876). We have been relieved 
of the support of Oliver Bardwell, he having received some pro- 
perty from a deceased relative. ' It was hoped that the town 
might recover, to some extent, the money expended on his ac- 
count in years past, and we have put in a claim against his 
estate. We are advised, however, that there is no law whereby 
we can recover. His guardian has assumed his expenses since 
January 1st, 1876. 

The number of applicants for temporary relief has increased 
during the winter. We hope, however, that, as soon as spring 
opens, we shall be relieved to a great extent of this class of 
paupers. Have buried five persons during the year : Lewis 
Beaugor, Tiba Wheeler and child, Cynthia Remington, and 
Lewis Covill, 



The cost for tramps is $20.00 less than in 1875. In comparing 
the last three months with the corresponding months of last 
year we notice a considerable decrease in numbers. We find 
that nearly half of the whole number provided for during the 
year carne into town during the months of March and April. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The expense for repairs of highways and bridges for the year 
has been $1,729.49, exceeding the appropriation by $329.49. Of 
this the Selectmen have expended for new bridges and culverts, 
repairs of old bridges, and lumber for general use, about $625. 

The Surveyors have expended about $1,100, not a large sum, 
when the amount of labor performed is taken into considera- 
tion. The roads were left in bad condition by the spring fresh- 
ets, and a great many of the smaller bridges and sluices were 
badly washed, and have been rebuilt. The great amount of 
snow that has fallen during the past winter, has rendered neces- 
sary an unusual expenditure of money for that season of the 
year. 

The bridges, with the exception of one, are now in good con- 
dition, although some of the older ones will doubtless need some 
repairs within the coming year. The bridge over the main 
stream on the Depot road will need attention as soon as the 
ground is in favorable condition. We recommend that about 
$1,400 be appropriated for repairs of highways and bridges for 
the coming year. 

TOWN DEBT. 

At the annual meeting, the Selectmen were authorized to 
take measures to reduce, if possible, the rate of interest upon 
the town debt. On April 29, 1876, we succeeded in making a 
loan of Richardson, Hill & Co., of Boston, of $5,500, on the fol- 
lowing terms, viz. : rate of interest 5-J- per cent., payable semi- 
annually ; $1,000 of the principal to be paid in one year, $2,000 
to be paid in two years, $2,500 to be paid in three years. The 
first payment becomes due April 29th of this year. With these 
funds, a note of $5,220, with interest, was paid at the Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. • 

The liabilities of the town at the present time consist of these 



notes ($5,500), and notes held by Northampton savings banks 
($3,275), Selectmen's orders unpaid ($1,473.38), outstanding 
bills amounting to about $400, and balance County tax and 
interest ($960.00) ; total, $11,608.38. To offset this we find a 
balance against the Treasurer and Collector of $6,289.15, leav- 
ing $5,3iy.23 as the indebtedness of the town. 



EXPENDITUEES, 



PAID OLD BILLS. 

L. S. Crafts, care of watering tank, $ 5 00 

Joseph Billings, services, Selectman, 120 00 

A. E. Strong, " " 73 60 

Charles L. Warner, " " 25 00 

G. A. Pierce, M. D., professional services, 5 00 

E. A. Stockbridge, care watering tank, 5 00 

S. C. Wrightington State agent, board of James Shea, 23 00 

E. H. Wood, house rent, house rent, Oliver Vining, 15 63 
Smith & Searle, coffins, Pamelia Dickinson and Nancy 

Morton, 37 25 

Support of Francis Abbott, 35 00 

'* James Shea, 14 00 

Sundry Highway bills, 111 69 

C. M. Barton, M.D., professional ser., Cynthia Wheeler, 34 00 

" " " " Robert Reardon, 7 00 

" William Jenkins, 29 00 

" Richard Wheeler, 9 00 

" Nancy Morton, 8 00 
E. F. Billings, services, Constable, Collector and 

Librarian, 1874, 155 00 
E. F. Billings, services, Constable, Collector and 

Librarian, 1875, 57 00 

House rent, Jane M. Stone, 15 00 

784 17 



PAID FOR PAUPERS. 



Support of Christian Schroeder 


$ 71 00 


" Cynthia Remington, 


69 50 


" Lewis Beaugor, • 


80 61 


rt Anthony Gilbert, 


19 83 


" Peter Pecor, 


7 25 


" Buckley family, 


21 00 


Thomas McGrath, 


24 00 


" Joseph Martin, 


17 50 


John Tobin, 


10 00 


" James Shea, 


87 37 


" Paul LaMountain, 


5 00 


'* Joseph Proulx, 


5 00 


" Jane Stone and family, 


68 00 


" Lewis Covill, 


83 73 


" William Hayes, 


88 00 


" Ellen M. Morley, 


5 00 


Ci Francis Abbott, 


175 05 


" A. M. Richmond, 


144 32 


N. P. Gould, tramps, 


203 40 


A. E. Strong, cash paid, 


5 10 


J. D. Billings, provisions, 


4 86 


Clapp & Johnson, provisions, 


12 50 


Mary Powers, 


10 95 


Smith & Searle, coffins for Lewis Beaugor, Tibi Reming- 


ton and child, Cynthia Remington, 


Lewis Covill, 55 00 


Joseph Billings, — Cash paid. 


5 00 


Frank Anderson, " 


4 50 




$1,283 47 


SCHOOLS. 




Edmund Donavan, wood, 


$ 5 50 


P. L. Strong & Sons, wood and sawing, 


30 00 


Edward C. Waite, 


42 00 


Charles Wolfram, " 


10 00 


Erastus Strong, sawing wood, 


7 50 


Cooley Bartlett, 


1 50 


William Burt, 


2 00 


Alvin L. Strong, coal, and drawing, 


44 13 



Oscar Belden, coal, 

Ohas. T. Parsons, " 

Charles Porter, services as janitor, 

Henry Cutter, 

William Burt, 

William Porter, 

Flora J. Pomeroy, teaching, 



and board, 



board of teacher, 



Jane M. Cowles, 
Alice L. Bartlett, 
Cora H. Eaton, 
Clara Streeter, 
Mary C. Billings, 
Hope Alvord, 
Eunice J, Morton, 
Maria L. Tuttle, 
Emma Porter, 
Myra Parsons, 
Albert H. Marsh, 
John M. Strong, 

AlvinL. Strong, " " 

" " school apparatus, 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 
Joseph S. Wells, merchandise, 
Lilla Smith, teaching and board, 
Nicholas Powers, service as janitor, 
Oscar Belden, maps, 
Ellen M. Nash, teaching, 
H. W. Field, board of teacher, 
L. E. Field, services as janitor, 
Fred. Vedemyer, " " 

L. E. Bartlett, " « 

Fred. Vedemyer, " " 



$32 00 


37 


04 


9 


50 


8 


00 


22 


75 


13 


00 


88 


00 


262 


50 


154 


00 


197 


50 


102 


00 


262 


50 


96 


00 


80 


00 


190 


50 


97 


50 


58 


00 


30 


00 


39 


00 


66 


00 


5 


19 


12 


74 


6 


24 


91 


00 


2 


25 


22 


25 


56 


00 


56 


00 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


25 


3 


25 



Leander Cooley, 
Thomas Cutter, 
Adam Doppman, 
Pomeroy Doppman, 



PAID HIGHWAYS AND BEIDGES. 
labor, 



2,254 09 



$ 18 59 

1 45 
4 00 

2 86 



Wm. B. Langdon, labor, 
James Kyan, " 

" earth, 

J. W. Field, 
Theo. Baggs, 
Fred. Carl, 
Nicholas Powers, 
Edwin Harris, 
Erastus Strong, 
Alvin L. Strong, 
John Adams, 
Paul LaMountain, 
Henry G. Moore, 
Luman Moore, 
Albert Webber, 
Elihu Marsh, 
William Carson, 
William M. Jones, 
A. S. Jones & Sons, 
Luther Wells, 
Sylvanus Crafts, 
C. W. White, 
Lyman Abbott, 
William Kaiser, 
D wight Morton, 
James Breeor, 
Michael Boyle, 
Michael Kyan, 
James Dunn, 
Maurice Fitzgibbons, 
Henry Stenglein, 
George W. Fitch, 
John McHugh, 
Peter Pecor, 
Charlotte W. Billings, 
J. D. Billings, 
F. D. ." 
J. A. 
S. F. 
George W. Smith, 



$11 


59 


12 


95 


6 


00 


2 


00 


8 


87 


7 00 


6 


60 


4 


60 


6 


30 


8 


00 


5 


80 


1 


20 


12 


51 


3 


60 


2 


78 


3 


60 


1 


50 


9 


12 


15 


50 


13 


15 


1 


03 


10 


12 


1 


09 




93 




28 


7 


63 


7 


80 


10 


00 


8 


50 




50 


1 


50 


14 


40 


2 


48 


3 


75 


2 


00 


3 


75 


6 


00 


3 


00 


21 


70 




90 



Patrick Mullany, labor, $ 4 12 

Michael Hade, " 1 50 

Anthony Allair, Jr., " 13 60 

J. D. Brown, « 10 25 

Joseph Smith, " 1 65 

Anthony Johnson, " 1 35 

James Nolan, " 3 00 

Oscar Belden, " 6 50 

R. & W. H. Belden, " 13 50 

O. S. Graves, " 3 46 

Eurotas Morton, " 4 74 

Philos Doane, " 75 

William Boyle, " 2 75 

Ohas. L. Graves, services as surveyor, 40 55 

" labor, . 19 43 

0. D. Bardwell, services as surveyor, 30 00 

labor, 40 40 

lumber, 7 01 

Edwin Brainerd, services as surveyor, 37 20 

labor, 29 98 

Jacob Carl, services as surveyor, 20 00 

labor, 54 87 

Henry H. Field, services as surveyor, 25 75 

labor, 17 49 

Henry K. Graves, services as surveyor, 25 25 

labor, 26 85 

Edward Waite, lumber, 108 55 

Estate L. N. Granger* " 65 64 

William P. Allis, " 41 43 

34 29 

5 00 
3 15 

13 00 

3 62 

20 00 

2 92 

3 75 
75 

6 90 
11 72 



D. P. Morton, 


a 


Michael Boyle, 
Frank W. Prince, 

a a 


a 
a 


John H. Ryan, 
John B. Ryan, 
Charles Kingsley, 
Moses " 


labo 

a 
a 
a 
a 


Edwin 


a 


S. W. Kingsley, 
John O'Neill, 


a 

a 



10 



H. S. Porter, labor, 

J. D. Porter, 

Silas " 

James " " 

Alvin Sanderson, " 

E. A. Stockbridge, 

C. B. Marsh, 
0. Marsh & Son, 

D. W. Wells, 

Joseph S. Wells, merchandise, 
L. S. Crafts, labor, 

C. B. Dickinson, 
William H. Dickinson, " 

" " lumber, 

David Fitzgerald, labor, 

Philip Jubenyille, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Mosher, 
Daniel A. Vining, 
Horace Waite, 
A. M. Peck, 
Peter Kosebush, 

E. W. Field, 
H. S. Hubbard, 
M. N. 
Elisha 
S. G. 

Chas. E " 
John Gendron, 
Philip Carl, 
Edward Proulx, 
L. S. Bliss, 
Elijah Bard well, 
C. D. Bartlett, 
William P. Allis, 
N. P. Bradford, 
Lewis Rabboin, 
Patrick Daley, 
Labor on Bridge near Depot, 

" Pine Bridge, 

" Bridge near A. E. Strong's, 



$12 00 



4 


00 


1 


50 


6 


00 


4 


25 




48 


11 


47 


27 


55 


11 


27 


7 


48 


2 


75 


13 


50 


16 


80 


16 


22 


1 


45 


1 


25 


1 


05 


2 


75 


4 


78 


10 


60 


4 


12 


4 


35 


16 


95 


14 


00 


5 


00 


9 


50 


5 


50 


5 


75 


28 


40 


15 


75 


4 


25 


17 


00 


3 


96 


11 


00 


9 


00 


2 


75 




38 


26 


96 


83 


63 


124 


50 



11 



Labor on Bridge near West Farms, 

" Bridges, West Brook, 
A. E. Strong, labor on Bridges, 
John Gay, labor, 

E. A. Stockbridge, " 
M. E. Warner, 



E. S. Warner, 



$29 


60 


62 


02 


16 


50 


5 


13 




48 


20 


00 


6 


25 



$1,729 49 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Jos. Billings, cash paid expense to Buckland and Shel- 

burne Falls, $ 5 00 

Jos. Billings,, cash paid, sundries, 8 00 

" \ '" Expense, Shelburne Falls, 5 00 

" " Sundries, 8 10 

" " Expense, Boston, 14 05 

" u Drawing and sawing wood, town hall, 3 20 

Trumbull & Gere, printing, 36 38 

Thad. Graves, legal service, Sunderland bridge case, 30 00 

"■ " " Town vs. Alvin Sanderson, 10 00 

'< Costs, " " " 25 03 

Eames & Sprague, repairs, School House Hill, 40 27 

Stove and fixtures, W. Farms, 60 77 

O. D. Case & Co, furniture, school house, W. Farms, 201 19 

Wm. Dougherty, repairs, school house, Center, 3 25 

H. W. Hubbard, services, Assessor, 52 50 

D. W. Wells, " " 38 75 

W. D. Billings, " " 57 50 

" " Cash paid for Assessors, 3 50 

Bridgman & Childs, record book, 5 05 

L. B. White, school house, W. Farms, 63 50 

A. M. Peck, services as sexton, 9 00 

" " " and returning deaths, 12 75 

Abating nuisance near Jas. O. Waites's, 60 48 

L. P. Dole, repairing cemetery fence, Hill, 4 63 

C. W. Marsh, " " W. Farms, 4 00 

Patrick Daley, damage, highway, 2 25 

Tillotson & Smith, merchandise, town hall, 8 50 



12 

Benj. M. Warner, express, $ 75 

Charlotte W. Billings, drawing wood, town hall, 6 00 

Marshall Wheeler, sawing wood, town hall, 1 50 

Edward Waite, " " " 10 50 

S. W. Kingsley, repairing road scraper, 30 00 

Jos. S. Wells, merchandise, 2 30 

Smith & Searle,* window shades, school house, W. Farms, 3 63 

A. E. Strong, repairing road scraper, 6 00 

Oscar Belden, services as School Committee, and repairs, 24 90 

Geo. A. Billings, " " " 29 00 

cash paid, 12 25 

W. D. Billings, services as Town Clerk, 25 00 

" " Kecording and returning births, deaths, 

and marriages, 31 80 

W. D. Billings, postage, 1 20 

E. S. Warner, services as Constable, 10 00 

Theo. Porter, services as watchman, and care town hall, 3 00 

E. F. Billings, services as Constable, 10 70 

Bond Bros. & Bottum, legal service, Selectmen, 37 1G 

" " " " " Draper case, 97 33 

Peck & Pierce, insurance, 50 00 

Alvin L. Strong, cash paid, sundries, 10 33 

Oscar Belden, services as School Committee, 17 00 

Horace Shu m way, express, 12 00 



$1,205 00 



STATE AID. 

Mrs. Buth Dennis, $48 00 

" Minerva Anderson, 48 00 

" Clarissa Vining, 48 00 

" U. B. Graves, 48 00 



$192 00 



TOWN AID. 



Mrs. Clarissa Vining, $34 66 

" U. B. Graves, 34 66 

$69 32 



13 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Wm. Greenwood, 
Bridgman & Childs, books, 
Emma E. Porter, books, 
Wm. P. Allis, wood, 
Harlan P. Tisdall, sawing wood, 
Wm. P. Allis, book, 
Jos. S. Wells, merchandise, 
Wm. P. Allis, catalogues, 
E. J. Oornwell, binding books, 
E. F. Billings, services as Librarian, 
" " Cataloguing books, 



BILLS PAYABLE. 

Treas. Note, Richardson, Hill & Co., 
" " Hampshire Savings Bank, 
i( " Northampton " " 

Outstanding Bills, 
" Orders, 

Balance County tax and interest, 



$2 


25 


86 


94 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


50 


3 


14 


34 


00 


23 


25 


25 


00 


10 


75 



$195 83 



$5,500 00 


1,300 00 


1,975 00 


400 00 


1,473 38 


960 00 


$11,608 38 



RECAPITULATION. 

RECEIPTS, 1876. 

Balance in hands Collector and Treas., March, 1876, $4,184 05 

Note, J. D. Brown, and interest, 257 00 

" D. P. Morton, " " 202 54 

Richardson, Hill & Co., 5,500 00 

Anthony Allair, Jr., license, 100 00 

Received from State for Paupers, 35 47 

Corporation tax, 134 75 

Bank tax, 1,838 96 



14 



State aid, 

Massachusetts school fund, 

H. S. Gere, dog fund, 1876, 

Town of Whately, for scholars, 

Town of Northampton, for pauper, 

Eent of town hall, 

Interest on taxes, received from E. A. Bardwell, 

Assessment of taxes for 1876, 



288 00 

197 75 

70 81 

10 00 

10 00 

13 00 

130 38 

7,937 26 



, 


$20,909 97 


EXPENDITURES. 




Selectmen s' orders,, 


$6,239 98 


State Tax, 


1,278 00 


County Tax, 


1,000 00 


Discount on Taxes, 


215 57 


Note, Hampshire Savings Bank, 


5,250 00 


Interest on Notes, 


554 77 


State Treas., liquor license fees, 


25 00 


Assessors order of abatement, 


29 50 


Town's order of abatement to E. F. Billings, 


28 00 


i 


$14,620 82 


Balance, in hands of Treasurer and Collector, 


6,289 15 



$20,909 97 

JOSEPH BILLINGS, J Selectmen 
A. E. STRONG, \ of 

HENRY G. MOORE, 5 Hatfield. 

E. A. BARDWELL, Treasurer. 



Hatfield, March 12, 1877. 



15 



APPROPRIATIONS, 1877. 



Schools, 

Highways and Bridges,, 

Poor, 

Contingent Expenses, 

School House, West Farms, 

Public Library, 

Town Aid, 



$2,000 00 


1,400 


00 


1,200 


00 


1,000 


00 


261 


43 


250 


00 


70 


00 



$6,181 43 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 



Dan'l A. Vining, 
Edwin W. Field, 
Dan'l W. Wells, 
W. D. Billings, 
F. D. Billings, 
Rufus Cowles, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, 
Samuel P. Billings, 
Roswell Hubbard, 
R. H. Belden, 
Chas. Wilkie, 



P. L. Strong, 
J. E. Wight, 
Moses E. Warner, 
Chas. L. Warner, 
Alvin L. Strong, 
Luther Wells, 
Geo. C. Marsh, 
James O. Waite, 
James Porter, 
Albert Webber, 
Caleb D. Bardwell. 



16 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 19th, 1877., 

Article 1st. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2nd. To choose all necessary town officers for the year 
ensuing, including one person for member of the School Corn, 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3rd. To choose an Elector under the will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4th. To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submit- 
ted by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5th. To hear the reports of the Selectmen and School 
Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6th. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7th. To take action in relation to raising money to de- 
fray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8th. To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintainance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing- 
year. 

Art. 9th. To see if the town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library, the ensuing year, and choose a Committee 
for the same. 

Art. 10th. To see what action the town will take in relation 
to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 11th. To see if t^e town will raise money to pay the 
outstanding debts of the town. 

Art. 12th. To see if the town will abate certain taxes com- 
mitted to E. A. Bardwell for collection. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

For the Year Ending March, 1877, 



The closing of another year suggests to your Committee the 
duty of submitting their annual report. As a town, we have 
cause for congratulation with the general progress of school 
work. If we should deal with particular cases, it would be easy 
to indicate faults, and opportunities for improvement. We have 
not yet reached the ideal of excellence ; and, while this is con- 
ceeded, we claim proficiency in many particulars, both on the 
part of teacher and pupil. 

It is not proposed to single out instances of failure or success, 
for public attention, either on the part of teacher, scholar or 
school. For it is obvious that, without an understanding of the 
connecting circumstances, there might be unjust impressions 
formed that would produce injury rather than good. We prefer, 
to view results attained in their general aspects, with suggestions 
as they occur. 

There is no danger that as citizens we shall place too high an 
estimate upon our common school system of education. To it, 
largely, we owe our position as a State and Nation, and our hope 
for the future is in the free and thorough diffusion of knowl- 
edge among the masses to which it aims. It should be admit- 
ted that their support is a large item of expense to every town. 
The amount appropriated in the State for the year ending April, 
1875, was nearly $4,500,000, equal to a trifle less than $15 for 
each child between the ages of five and fifteen years. (The per 
centage in our own town, however, was less than $7). But the 



18 

cost of ignorance would be much greater. Even now the ex- 
penses of our penal and reformatory institutions in Massachu- 
setts, with the criminal courts, approximate to this amount. 
And when we remember that eighty per cent, of the crime in 
New England is committed by the seven per cent, who cannot 
read, it is clear that a failure to provide facilities for the educa- 
tion of the young would be even more expensive. But the edu- 
cation afforded by the public school has a higher purpose even 
than the restraint upon the criminal and vicious. It aims to 
enlighten the mind, to cultivate its powers, and to equip with 
the intelligence necessary for the successful prosecution of busi- 
ness and for the higher functions of citizenship. 

In these times of financial distress, when taxes are burden- 
some, there is a general desire to reduce expenses, both public 
and private. Town and city expenditures are closely scanned, 
that they may be diminished to the lowest point possible. Un- 
questionably, a fair reduction in all departments is necessary. 
And if, in relation to schools, such a course does not subvert 
their best interests, it is wise and just. But there is a point 
beyond which it is not judicious to go, even under the guise of 
economy. We can ill afford, at this day, to cripple those inter- 
ests calculated to implant in the heart a common sense of hu- 
manity, self-respect, and the discipline of self-government. 

The course of study in the public schools is mainly prepara- 
tory ; the foundation work, and hence of the first importance. 
But with the eagerness to reach something higher, the tendency 
is to neglect those branches that will give character and effect to 
all future attainments. Beading and spelling do not occupy 
the place they ought in public education. To be proficient in 
either, is an accomplishment that few possess. Pupils are apt 
to consider reading in the light of recreation, and if they have 
ascended from the Primer to the Sixth Keader, and been able to 
pronounce the words correctly, they consider their work accom- 
plished. Elocution, in its strictest sense, should not necessarily 
be sought, but rather the ability to grasp the meaning of the 
author, appropriate his ideas, and utter them with a clear, easy, 
and natural expression. Teachers seldom succeed in this branch 
of their work, when they fail to give reading its proper place as 
a study, and demand of each one under their charge as careful 
preparation in this as in any pursued. 



19 

Writing and spelling have a practical value, and are essential 
elements in the preparatory work. Proficiency in them can only 
be achieved by patient, well directed effort. Indeed, in the 
grouping of these three are found the foundation principles of 
all future acquirements. We have urged their importance in 
the schools, and it is our pleasure to state that, in some instances, 
teachers have taken the position with regard to them that they 
demand, and yet, improvement is in order. 

The need of correct and efficient instruction in the elementary 
schools cannot be sufficiently emphasised. "As the twig is 
bent the tree is inclined," is a maxim as true here as elsewhere. 
If we would have the tree symmetrical in its maturity it must 
be carefully pruned and nurtured in its early growth ; and if we 
seek for our children the possession of a well-developed mind 
and character, we should be satisfied with nothing less than a 
careful and judicious training in childhood, both at home and 
in school. The opinion is often entertained that teachers of 
ordinary acquirements can direct the education of the child, and 
even that those oitering the teacher's profession are sufficiently 
skilled for the work ; but these are pernicious ideas. If we 
must have instructors of this class, let them be placed over those 
more mature, where there is at least a chance that their thought- 
lessness and inefficiency may be counteracted, and not be im- 
pressed indelibly on the minds of little children. To control 
and interest the child, is a great conquest To employ, profita- 
bly, the activities, both mental and physical, that otherwise 
would be wasted in mischief, requires tact ; and to supply, as in 
many instances is often necessary, the deficiencies of home in- 
struction, requires patient toil. 

Teachers need your sympathy and co-operation. Show them, 
parents, by your frequent presence in the schools, that you are 
interested in their success, and it will not only tend to redouble 
their energy, but you will receive from so doing, a practical 
knowledge of the methods employed, and thus be able to judge 
by your own observation of the results attained. Criticisms 
would not be so often unreasonable if they were based on per- 
sonal acquaintance with the facts. The best endeavors of a 
teacher may be entirely neutralized, and failure in her work en- 
sue, simply by accepting for truth heresay reports, that may be 
the production of some one's imagination, and possibly exist only 



20 

there. Parents are not always aware of the assistance they can 
render in making onr schools more successful. Nor do they 
realize the injury they may produce by thoughtless interference 
with teachers in school government. To be left undisciplined 
is a calamity to any school, and a serious injury to any child. 
It cannot be expected that any teacher will successfully govern 
and instruct those whose parents are indifferent in regard to their 
attendance and conduct. The interests of the school, family and 
individual are one ; and the parent, who by any means encour- 
ages his children in insubordination, is contributing to their 
ruin, and surely laying up sorrow for himself, besides lending 
that influence, which works like leaven in destroying the suc- 
cessful operation of the school. 

We have reason for honest pride in the possession of such am- 
ple facilities for home education. The school buildings are in 
the main, pleasant, commodious, and conveniently situated, so 
as to be accessible to all. Additions have been made to the 
apparatus from year to year, as available funds would allow, and 
there is still room for more. The necessity yet remains for a 
careful and wise supervison, and a selection of teachers who 
have a love for their work ; and something more, an ability to 
develop the faculties of pupils under their charge. The choice 
of teachers is not always an easy task. Your committee have 
aimed to lay aside all personal preferences and prejudices in the 
discharge of this duty, and yet, we agree that we have some- 
times erred. The test of superior education or scholarship is 
not always safe, neither are the recommendations of others 
always reliable. The only safe means of discrimination is by 
trial. 

There is a noticeable ambition on the part of most scholars to 
finish the elementary branches of the Public Schools as early as 
possible, with a view of entering the Academy. So far as this 
tends to inspire zeal and arouse a determination to thoroughly 
master their work, it is commendable. But if, on the other 
hand, it tends to a superficial knowledge of the rudiments of 
education, it is pernicious, and should be corrected. Crowding 
children will never be successful, and the study of the higher 
branches will hardly supply the necessity for a complete mastery 
of the fundamental principles of education. If these are con- 
quered, the facilities afforded by the Academy for a higher edu- 



21 

cation will more certainly accomplish the desired object. We 
record with pleasure our appreciation of the results already 
attained in this institution, and, with its present thorough and 
skillful management, it is destined to fulfill our most sanguine 
expectations as an auxilliary to our Public Schools in furnishing 
that discipline of mind, practical knowledge, and social and 
moral development necessary for the proper discharge of the 
responsibilities of life. 

Your Committee have, in the discharge of their duties during 
the year now closed, endeavored to confine themselves in their 
expenditures to the sum appropriated for their use, and a perusal 
of the financial statement accompanying this report will give you 
the needed information upon this point. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

The following named scholars attended school the entire year 
without an absent or tardy mark : 

Abbie L. Fitch, Maggie Benway, 

Mary E. Nolan, Gertrude A. Strong, 

Sadie Porter, John Steinglin, 

Johnnie Sheehan, Harry J. Wight, 

Sadie Kingsley, H. Wiley Field, 

Ella Jubinville. 



No. of children between the ages of 5 and 15, 313 

No. reported last year, 311 

No. of teachers employed, 12 

No. of children who have attended school, 314 

Average number attending each term, 254 

Average attendance, 205 

No. of children over 15, 14 

No. of children under 5, 5 



22 



NAMES OF TEACHERS AND WAGES PAID PER 
MONTH, INCLUDING BOARD. 



Hill Grammar, L. Hope Alvord, summer, 
" " Eunice J. Morton, fall, 

" , *' Emma E. Porter, winter, 

Hill Primary, Jane M. Cowles, 
Center Grammar, Clara Streeter, summer, 
" " Maria L. Tuttle, fall and 

winter. 
Center Primary, Mary C. Billings, 
North Hatfield, Cora H. Eaton, 
West Brook, A. L. Bartlett, summer and fall, 

" Lillian Smith, winter, 

W. Hatfield, F. J. Pomeroy, summer and fall, 
" M. E. Parsons, winter, 



$32 00 




32 00 




30 00 


273 50 


30 00 


262 50 


34 00 




66 50 


292 50 


30 00 


262 50 


28 00 


227 50 


28 00 




28 00 


245 00 


28 00 




30 00 


251 5 



Amount of appropriation for schools, $2,000 00 

Received from State School Fund, 197 75 

i( From Dog Fund, 1875, 86 70 

" " From School Committee of Whately, 

for tuition, 5 00 

Amount received from Rufus Swift, for tuition, 5 00 



Amount expended for teachers and board, 
" " " Wood and coal, 

" " " Care of school houses, 

" " " Mdse. and apparatus for schools, 

" Unpaid bills, 1875-6, 

Balance unexpended, 



$2,294 45 

School Committee 

of the 
Town of Hatfield. 



£2,294 45 


$1815 00 


211 


67 


62 


00 


46 


42 


119 


00 


40 


36 



G. A. BILLINGS, 
OSCAR BELDEN, 
ALVIN STRONG, 



Hatfield, March, 1877. 



23 



SCHOOLS. 


Length of : Whole No. 1 Average at- | 

School ■ Scholars : tendance in 
in Weeks. • in each : each School. 
: School. j 


No. of 

Children 

under five 

years of 

age. 


No. of 
Children 

over 15 

years of 

age. 


© 

a 
a 


13 
ft 


u : © 

5 : a 

a : a 

£ '• 2 


"3 
ft 


u • © 

5 ■ a 
.a : a 

t> : 3 
t> : xn 


13 
ft 




© 

a 
a 
£ 


13 

ft 


© 

t 


© 

a 
a 


1 

ft 


© 
■p 

a 

$ 


Hill Grammar . . 
Hill Primary . . . 
Center Grammar 
Center Primary. 
North Hatfield. 

West Brook 

West Hatfield.. 


12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 


10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 


13J28 
13j 45 
13J36 
13J58 
13126 
13134 
13J34 


23 
45 
29 
52 
25 
37 
43 


24I19J 

35J34J 

33131 

45J47& 

21!21| 

39=24 

50I26| 


381 
22? 

21 2 5 

27| 
31J 


20J 
281 
28| 

181 

28 

43J 




2 

;0 

jl 

jl 

lo 

[0 






1 



1 









1 









1 





= 

10 





1 




1 






4 


6 
4 



REPORTS 



TTh® SlDJMVingN 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THF. 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending March 1, 1878. 



HATFIELD, MASS.: 
POWER PRESS OF ECONOMICAL PRINTING CO. 

1878. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



The appropriations made by the town for the year, ending- 
March 1, 1878, amount in the aggregate to $7,843.09. The State 
Tax was $1,065.00, and the County Tax, $1,810.74. 

The Selectmen and Treasurer were instructed to refund the 
town debt, where the rate of interest exceeded 6 per cent. We 
have paid one note in the Hampshire County Savings Bank of 
$1,300.00, and one- note in the Northampton Institution for Sav- 
ings of $1,975. We have made a loan of John Pickering & 
Mosely of $2,000 for one year; rate of interest, 4^ per cent. 
We have also made the first payment of $1,000 to Richardson, 
Hill & Co.; the second payment of $2,000 on Richardson, Hill & 
Co. ? s note comes due April 29, 1878; and the $2,000 note held by 
John Pickering & Mosely, comes due in June, 1878. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

Fourteen hundred dollars ($1400) was appropriated for this 
service. 

We have expended for Highways and Bridges $1,225.22. We 
found two of the bridges on the Swamp road in bad condition, 
and we were obliged to relay the walls on both, at an expense of 
about $125, We thought best to lay the walls in cement, think- 
ing it would be economy for the town. We have also built a foot 
walk near the Hill Bridge, expense $7D. 

The wall on one of the dry bridges on the old Depot road has 
gone down, and it will be necessary to relay it; and one bridge 
near David Powers' will have to be rebuilt. 



POOR. 

We have expended for Poor $874.50. Roily Wells came to us 
the 25th of July, and we have boarded him ever since at an ex- 
pense of $2. 50 per week. David D. Gardner applied to us for 
help, Jan. 31, 1878, in very feeble condition, and has been under 
medical treatment ever since. Mrs. Sarah Williams came to us 
for help, Dec. 3d, 1877, and we have provided for her, and have 
charged same to the State, as we find that she is a State pauper. 
Geo. Hathaway was sent to the State Reform School the first of 
April last, and we have paid $1. per week for his support. Our 
tramp bill has not been as large as some years, being but $53.85; 
and of this sum, $19.00 was paid in the month of March, 1877. 

We have settled with Mr. J. E. Doane in full, for all taxes 
placed in his hands for collection, for the year 1877. He has 
performed the duties of Collector with such promptness and abil- 
ity, that we consider it worthy of note; it being something so 
very unusual, for a Collector to settle in full, before the annual 
town meeting. Our Treasurer, Mr. Roswell Billings, has also 
performed his duties with ability and promptness. 

The amount of uncollected taxes for the year 1875 and 1876, 
placed in our hands for collection, was $1,541.33 and interest; 
the amount collected on the face of the taxes was $1,339.33; 
interest on same, $84. 13, being a loss of $202. 

The indebtedness of the town has been reduced $2,275, leaving 
the present liabilities: outstanding bills to about $600, and notes 
amounting to $6,500; total, $7,100. To offset this, we find in 
the hands of the Treasurer, cash, $1,705.73, and balance due on 
E. F. Billing's note of $52.02, leaving a balance of $5,342.25 as 
the indebtedness of the town. 



EXPENDITURES, 



Paid Old Hill*, 

L. S. Crafts, care watering tank, $ 5 00 

A. E. Strong, services Selectmen, 71 00 

H. G. Moore, " " 38 00 

Joseph Billings, " " 125 00 

Horace Shumway, wood, coal, &c, 22 70 

Support of F. R Abbott, 3190 

A. M. Richmond, 39 74 

A. L. Strong, services School Committee, 23 00 

Town of Hadley, aid Peter Pecor, 4 67 

C. M. Barton, M. D., medical services Poor, 33 33 

Peter Carter, tramps 1876, 2 50 

Metcalf & Co., printing, 1874, 1875 and 1876, 23 10 

Gazette Printing Co., Town reports, 30 00 

Win. Dougherty, repairs on school houses, 3 25 

L. B. White, repairs Town Hall, 8 99 

C. H. Jones, " "■ 3 07 

Bond Bros. & Bottum, legal services Draper case, 26 77 

Bridgman & Childs, books for Library, 6Q 53 

Sundry Highway Bills, 89 74 

Geo. A. Billings, services School Committee, 15 00 

Fred. Vedemyer, " as janitor, 1 75 

E. F. Billings, " as Constable, 10 00 

$675 04 



JPaicl ±\>tt Paupers. 

Support of F. F. Abbott, 

A. M. Richmond, 

Joseph Martin, 

Barney McHugh and Tom Buckley, 

Mrs. A. Taylor, 

Joseph Proulx, 

Anthony Gilbert, 

Paul LaMountain, 

Mrs. Lewis Beaugor, 

Christian Schroeder, 

David D. Gardner, 

James Shea, 

Mrs. Michael Tobin, 

George Hathaway, 

Roily Wells, 

Marshall Wheeler, 

Buckley children, 

Peter Pecor, 

Joseph Proulx, 

Barney McHugh, 
F. A. Sackett, coffins for Marshall and Harriet Wheeler, 
William S. Briggs, tramps, 
J$. P. Gould, 
H. S. Hubbard, 
H.G.Moore, 

A. M. Peck, services as Sexton, 
0. M. Barton, M. D., medical services poor, 
H. S. Hubbard, cash paid, 

William Richtmyer, board Mrs. Sarah Williams, 
0. M. Barton, M. D., medical services D. D. Gardner, 

<f Marshall Wheeler, 
A, E. Strong, order, 
X. P. Gould, tramps. 



1160 


52 


163 


85 


20 


00 


76 00 


27 


00 


9 


22 


16 


95 


4 


50 


14 75 


45 


26 


1 


10 


30 


00 


9 


30 


38 


00 


89 


64 


5 


24 


9 


00 


2 


00 


4 


25 


10 


00 


20 


00 


34 


80 


5 


60 




65 




80 


8 


00 


6 


67 


3 


00 


14 00 


20, 


00 


9 


00 


2 


00 


13 


40 



*874 50 



Hig > lrwa,y Kills*. 

Hill District — Moses W. Kingsley, Surveyor. 



Henry A. Wade, 


labor, 


Hosea Wheeler, Jr. 


a 


James W. Warner, 


a 


E. S. Warner, 


a 


a 


earth, 


Charles Kingsley, 


labor, 


Moses W. Kingsley, 


a 


J. D. Porter, 


a 


George W. Warner, 


<( 


II, S. Hubbard, 


a 


0. L. Graves, 


" 


M. N. Hubbard, 


a 


John Gendron, 


a 


Horace Shumway, 


a 


John A. Warner, 


ii 


James Porter, 


a 


Moses W. Kingsley, 


a 


John Eyan, Sr., 


a 


L. G. Curtis, 


" 


Michael Larkin, 


a 


Charles Wilkie, 


a 


Wm. M. Jones, 


i i 


Patrick Mullanny, 


a 


Henry S. Porter, 


a 


Thaddeus Graves, 


a 


<( a 


earth, 


George C. Fitch, 


labor, 


a . a 


load old brick, 


Anthony Allair, Jr. 
Moses E. Warner, 


, 60 loads clay, 


earth, 


a a 


labor, 


John T. Fitch, 


a 


J. S. Graves, 


a 


Joseph Martin, 


ii 


A. Gilbert, 


a 


Nelson Allair, 


ii 



\ 2 31 

2 18 
13 44 

8 37 
17 35 

4 69 
34 85 

6 88 



2 


50 


21 


81 


3 


29 


8 


75 


1 


25 


7 


50 


2 


19 


8 


75 


29 


16 


1 


25 


1 


00 


2 


50 


4 72 


3 


75 


3 


75 


6 


88 


3 


76 


8 


60 


1 


88 




10 


6 


00 




40 


6 


75 


3 


75 


10 00 


I 


25 


2 


50 


1 


00 



$245 11 



8 

District No. 2 — Edwin Brainard, Surveyor, 
John Kiley, labor, 

D. W. Wells, 
Edwin Brain ard, services as Surveyor, 

" " labor, 

Lawrence Vol linger, i ' 



A. Gilbert, 


i i 


Henry Stingline, 


a 


Elisha Hubbard, 


a 


Fred. H. Bardwell, 


a 


J. D. Billings, 


a 


Michael Day. 


a 


Frank Steele, 


a 


Nicholas Powers, 


a 


Michael Boyle, 


a 


Anthony Allair, Jr. 


clay, 


Sam'l H. Dickinson 


, labor, 


James Nolan, 


a 


Luman Moore, 


a 


S. G. Hubbard, 


a 


District No. 3— Fi 


F. W. Prince, ' 


labor, 


A. M. Peck, 


a 


James Breeor, 


i i 


Fred. Carl, services as Surveyor, 


a 


labor, 


James Ryan, 


ii 


Edward Proulx, 


a 


a 


stone, 


Wm. Langdon, 


labor, 



1 


25 


4 


75 


32 


30 


11 


80 


2"37 


7 


82 


2 


00 


10 


50 


14 25 


12 


00 


1 


25 




63 


3 


38 


1 


38 


11 


00 


1 


25 




63 


5 


53 


19 


00 



$143 09 

Fred. Carl, Surveyor. 

3 50 

4 12 
7 17 

22 00 

34 41 

1 25 

6 00 

5 00 
3 50 

John Mcllugh, " 3 06 

Wm. H. Dickinson & Son, labor, 10 50 

John Burke. labor, 1 25 

John B. Evan. " 1 25 



John Karrin, 


labor, 


George W. Smith, 


Si 


John O'Neil, 


a 


L. S. Bliss, 


a 


0. Marsh & Son, 


a 


John D. Brown, 


i i 


Wm. P. Allis, 


<( 


Wm. Boyle, 


a 


E. C. Waite, 


a 


(i 


lumber, 


Elijah Bard well, 


earth, 



1 


25 




58 


1 


25 


5 


03 


7 


18 


3 


00 


7 


75 




62 




30 


1 


98 


10 00 



1141 95 

North Hatfield District — Wm. H. Belden, Surveyor. 
H. G. Moore, labor, 

C. B. Marsh & Son, " 
Wm. H. Belden, earth, 

u services as Surveyor, 

K. & W. H. Belden, labor, 
Leander Cooley, " 

Edwin W. Field, 
O. S. Graves, 
Henry H. Field, 
E. Marsh, 
John Field, 

Frank Mosher, " 

Dennis Cooley, u 

A. S. Jones & Sons, - 

$101 31 

West Brook District — Henry R. Graves, Surveyor. 
0. B. Dickinson, labor, 8 80 

Edward C. Waite, " 2 97 

Henry R. Graves, services as Surveyor, 16 76 

Philip Jubinville, labor, 1 22 

L. S. Crafts, " 2 84 



12 03 


11 47 


5 00 


17 85 


16 98 


4 75 


8 26 


3 44 


2 75 


1 75 


50 


3 96 


3 50 


9 07 



10 



Luther Wells, 


labor, 


9 00 


David Fitzgerald, 


a 


1 41 


Sylvanns Crafts, 


a 


55 


Michael Tobin, 


a 


30 


Chester W. White, 


a 


2 46 


Mrs. Elizabeth Mosher, <■' 


99 


Michael Clancy, 


a 


1 62 


E. A. Martin, 


a 


62 


• 


$49 54 


West Hatfield District- 


-Jacob Carl, Surveyor. 


J. A. Cutter, 


labor, 


75 


John Kiley, 


" 


1 50 


Prank Steele. 


it 


1 50 


Philip Carl, 


a 


30 37 


P. L. Strong & Sons 


y 


8 25 


Wm. Miller, 


a 


1 68 


M. P. Bradford, 


a 


11 75 


Adam Doppmann, 


a 


1 87 


Jacob Carl, services as Surveyor, 


20 00 


a 


labor, 


41 25 


Henry Dwight & Son, " 


2 50 


Lawrence Vollinger, 


a 


2 50 


John Batzold, 


" 


1 87 


Patrick Dailey, 


a 


1 25 


P. T. Abells, 


a 


7 00 


Nicholas Powers, 


a 


1 25 


Edmund Powers, 


a 


4 75 


John Eyan, 


a 


4 75 


George Vollinger, 


a 


1 25 


John Dandlin, 


a 


63 


Joseph Klistner, 


a 


94 


Joseph Stotter, 


i ( 


1 25 


A. E. Strong, 


a 


2 50 


Charles Wensel, 


i i 


1 25 



$152 61 



11 



• Briclg-es, Railing's, «&>e. 

Edwin Bardwell, for laying stone, 
David Curtis, labor, 

0. E. Dorsey, cement, 

Jacob Carl, labor, 

board E. Bardwell, 
H. S. Hubbard, lumber, 
E. C. Waite, 

Philip Carl, labor, 

Peter Saffer, ~ (i: « 

M. P. Bradford, 
S. W. Kingsley, 
Lawrence Vollinger, " 
Leander Cooley, posts and railings, 
George W. Warner, labor at foot-walk, 
M. E. Warner, lumber for foot-walk, 

ee labor, 

" drawing tile and stone, 

James" Porter, plank for foot- walk, 
0. S. Graves, lumber, 
Philip Jubinville, iron for bridges, 
L. S. Crafts, labor, 
E. M. Graves, nails, 
Hartwell & Prindle, cement pipe, 
John Eyan, land damage, 
Leander Cooley, labor, 
John Dandlin, 
E. A. Martin, nails, 
S. G. Hubbard, earth, 
J. S. Wells, nails, 
H. G. Moore, lumber, 

" labor, 



$20 


00 


. . 2 


50 


19 


00 


31 


55 


6 


50 


50 


43 


53 


14 


14 00 


12 


50 


16 


00 


5 


0Q 


1 


26 


15 


68 


10 


00 


37 40 


8 


75 


2 


50 


7 


50 


6 


25 


4 


60 


10 


03 


4 


00 


21 


50 


3 


00 


4 80 




62 




62 


2 


00 




79 


1.1 


90 


8 


00 



$389 81 



12 




Pat>lic JL.il>rary. 


< 


Bridgman & Childs, books, 


$7 00 


Wm. P. Allis, wood and sawing, 


6 00 


J. S. Wells, oil, 


53 


J. B. Smith, " 


10 


L. H. Kingsley, printing, 


1 00 


E. F. Billings, services as Librarian, 


25 00 




$39 63 


Paid State Aid. 




Mrs. Kuth Dennis, 


$48 00 


" Minerva Anderson, 


48 00 


" Clarissa Vining, 


48 00 


" U. B. Graves, 


48 00 



$192 00 



Paid Town Aid. 

Mrs. U. B. Graves, . $35 00 

" Clarissa, Vining, 35 00 



$70 00 



Paid 


for 


Schools. 




Miss Myra E. Parsons, 


teaching 


, Pantry, 


$161 00 


" Irene Lyman, 




a 


a 


91 00 


u Mary C. Billings, 




a 


Center, 


240 50 


" Maria L. Tuttle, 




a 


a 


84 00 


" J. R. Whitman, 




a 


a 


77 00 


** Jennie Stearns, 




a 


a 


98 00 


" Fannie Woodard, 




a 


Hill, 


247 50 


" Carrie L. Warner, 




a 


a 


162 50 


Mrs. Jane Cowles, 




a 


a 


78 00 


Miss Alice S. Bartlett, 




a 


North Hatfield, 


234 50 


i( Cora H. Eaton 




a 


West Brook, 


246 50 


E. C. Waite, wood and 


sawing, 


i\ 


56 25 


ii if; 






tforth Hatfield, 


21 00 



13 



James Cronan, sawing wood, West Brook, 


David Power s, " 


i i 


North Hatfield, 


A. L. Strong, coal. 


, Hill and Center, 


1 1 a 


Center, 


Charles Parsons, " 


( c 




Oscar Belden, " 


North Hatfield, 


0. E. Hubbard, wood, Hill, 




H. S. Porter, 






H. S. Hubbard, " 


<< 




George W. Fitch, " 


(i 




0. Schrcecler, sawing 


wood, 


HilL 


Joseph Martin, " 


i i 


" 


A. L. Strong, wood, 


Pantry 


? 


i.t i i 


Center 




Peter Schrceder. 


janitor, 


Hill, 


Freddie Cutter, 


<< 


Pantry, 


Eddie Porter, 


\< 


Center, 


Willie Newman, 


a 


a 


John McIIugh, 


'"' 


" 


Fred. Vedemyer, 




West Brook, 


Lemuel C. Bartlett, 


<:< 


North Hatfield, 


Eddie H. Belden, 


" 


and sawing wood, 



Tainton Bros. , Merrill & Co. , exchanging books, 
Oscar Belden, Express paid on books, 

" for making exchange of Reading books, 



^Miscellaneous Expenses, 



2 


25 


3 


00 


55 


77 


11 


62 


16 


86 


8 


00 


5 


50 


5 


65 


4 


50 


4 00 


3 


60 


1 


25 


17 


50 


10 50 


8 


68 


5 


50 


7 


75 


h 
i 


00 


1 


00 


4 


50 


3 


50 


4 


50 


78 


93 


4 00 


5 


00 


$2078 


11 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Eurotas Morton, Assessor, $47 50 

Charles L. Warner, '''< '■* 55 00 

Wm. D. Billings, " ' 60 00 

Clerk, 25 00 



14 

Charles L. Graves, School Committee, 
Oscar Belden, ic (i 

Alvin L. Strong, " " 

John E. Doane, Collector, 
Constable, 

$354 05 
SETTLEMENT WITH E. A. BARDWELL, TREASURER. 

Joseph Billings, $11 00 

S. P. Billings, 33 00 

L. G. Curtis, 15 ()0 

Bond Bros. & Bottum, legal counsel, 9 00 



22 


55 


30 


35 


28 


75 


80 00 


5 


50 



$68 00 

Incidental Expenses, 

Fred. Packard, repairing slate roof, W. B. school house, $10 00 

A. L. Strong, " school houses, 20 80 

C. L. Graves, " " " ■ . 10 40 

L. S. Crafts, labor, « " 5 00 

S. W. Kingsley, " " 5 40 

N. P. Gould, " " 7 50 

J. B. Smith, books for schools, 4 03 

J. S. Wells, " i( 7 57 

Win. Dougherty, repairs school house, 3 00 

A. L. Strong, books and crayons, 2 64 

Bond Bros. & Bottum, advice on pauper, 2 00 

" " legal service, Draper case, 109 50 

A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 3 50 

" work at cemetery, 13 00 

A. H. Marsh, " 5 00 
Wm. D. Billings, recording deaths, births and marriages, 27 00 

Horace Shunrway, expressage, 3. 00 

H. B. Pierce, register of voters, 80 

Gazette Printing Co., Selectmen's order book, 2 75 

Tax bills, 6 00 

L. H. Kingsley, printing dog notices, 2 25 



w 



Henry S. Gere, advertising, 

L. S. Crafts, care water tank, 

H. S. Hubbard, j{ thousand shingles and nails, 

J. S. Wells, oil for Town Hall, 

J. B. Smith, oil and nails for Town Hall, 

Expenses at fires, 

Wm. Barnes, labor, 

J. S. Wells, ink and pens, 

" Collector of old Taxes, 

" postage and stationery, 

" legal advice on taxes, 

" storage and keeper on drill, 
H. S. Hubbard, cash paid for lock, 
Bridgman & Childs, record book for Town Clerk, 
Eames & Sprague, balance on account, 



Interest Paicl. 



4 


50 


5 


00 


1 


50 




75 




44 


11 


25 




50 




16 


25 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 




35 


9 


80 


i 


36 



1329 31 



Hampshire County Savings Bank, 
Northampton Institution for Savings, 
John Pickering & Mosely, 
Eichardson, Hill & Co., 
Discount on Taxes, 


156 88 

32 25 

62 71 

275 00 

280 24 


Insurance. 

Oliver Walker. 


$707 08 
$90 00 



Bills Payable. 

Treas. Note, Richardson, Hill & Co., $4500 00 

" " John Pickering & Mosely, 2000 00 

Outstanding Bills, • 600 00 

$7100 00 



16 



RECAPITULATION. 



Receipts, 1 877. 

lteceived from S. P. Billings, L. G. Curtis and Joseph 
Billings, from settlement with E. A. Bardwell, 



Collector and Treasurer, 


$4302 89 


John Pickering & Mosely, 


3200 00 


Fred. Wilbor, Guardian for George Hathaway. 


13 00 


Oscar Belden, damages on school houses. 


1 00 


J. S. Wells, on old Taxes, 


1339 33 


" interest " ■ ' " 


84 13 


Bank Tax, 


1672 75 


Corporation Tax, 


121 25 


Massachusetts School fund. 


185 67 


State Aid, 


192 00 


Interest on taxes, from J. E. Doane, 


32 83 


Assessment of taxes for 1877, 


7843 09 


E. F. Billings, paid on note, 


75 00 


W. L. Smith, dog fund, 1877, 


58 18 




$19,121 12 


Expenditures, 1ST 7 




Selectmen's orders. 


$5998 51 


State Tax, 


1065 00 


County Tax, 


1810 74 


Discount on Taxes, 


280 24 


Note Hampshire County Sayings Bank, 


1300 00 


' * Northampton Institution for Savings, 


1975 00 


Interest on Notes, 


89 13 


Assessor's orders of abatement, 


67 87 



17 



Richardson, Hill & Oo.'s Note, 

Ci interest on Note, 

John Pickering & Mdsely's Note, 

" '*' interest on Kote, 

Selectmen's orders, 1876, 
County Tax and interest for 1876, 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, 



1000 


00 


275 


00 


1200 


00 


62 


71 


1340 


20 


950 


99 


$17,415 


39 


1,705 


73 


$19,121 


12 



H. S. HUBBARD, ) Selectmen 
H. G. MOORE, V . of 
M. E. WARNER, \ Hatfield. 



ROSWELL BILLINGS, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 6, 1878. 



18 



A^ppropria tioiin, 1 877. 



Schools, 

Highways and Bridges, 

Poor, 

Contingent Expenses, 

Interest, 

To pay on Town Debt, 

Town Aid, 

Public Library, 

Insurance. 



$1,800 


00 


1,400 


00 


1,000 


00 


800 


00 


490 00 


1,000 


00 


70 


00 


100 


00 


90 


00 



16.750 00 



luiert of" Jurors reported t>y the Selectmen. 



Edward Curtis/* 
A. S. Jones,/ % 
Reuben Beldeny % 
0. S. Graves, \ x 
J. Wesley Waite, / * 
William Richtmyer,/* 
Joseph Billings, % 
Fred. Carl, 
Seth W. Kingsley,* 
M. ST. Hubbard,' 
Roswell Billinas. * 



Samuel P. Billings, * 
¥m. D. Billings, \ 
John E. Doanc, v 
Otis C. Wells, 
Eleazer F. Cooley, /* 
Rafus H. Cowles, 
Charles Wilkie, 
Alvin L. Strong, 
Silas S. Dwight, 
M. P. Bradford, 
Nelson Allair. 

■ / 



19 



Articles in the Warrant fcr To-vra Meeting:, 

March 18, 1878. 

Article 1st. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2nd. To choose all necessary town officers for the year 
ensuing, including one person for member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3rd. To choose an Elector under the will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4th. To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submit- 
ted by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5th. To hear the reports of the Selectmen and School 
Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6th. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7th. To take action in relation to raising money to de- 
fray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8th. To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintainance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 9th. To see what action the town will take in relation 
to the prompt payment of taxes the coming year." 

Art. 10th. To see if the town will raise money to pay the 
outstanding debts of the town: 

Art. 11th. To see if the town will abate certain taxes com- 
mitted to John E. Doane for collection. 

Art. 12th. To see if the town will authorize the making of 
a full and complete record of the Soldiers and Sailors who served 
during the late war upon the quota of the town. 

Art. 13th. To see if the town will raise money to raise the 
road from Pine Bridge to a point near Cow Bridge road. 

Art. 14th. To see if the town will make an appropriation 
for the Public Library, and choose a Committee for the same. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



The School Committee, as a part of the duty assigned to them, 
respectfully present their Annual Eeport of the Schools in town. 

In taking a general review of school matters for the year, we 
think as much has been accomplished as in any year previous. 
Teachers have all labored faithfully, and in many of the schools, 
have met with decidedly good success. 

The number of schools supported by the town, is seven; they 
have been in session thirty-seven weeks, divided as follows : 
Spring term, twelve weeks; Fall term, eleven weeks; Winter term, 
fourteen weeks. Wages paid to teachers, six and one half and 
seven dollars per week, including board; No. of teachers em- 
ployed, eleven; No. retained throughout the year, four. 

The schools were supplied at the first of the winter term, with 
a new series of reading books, the Franklin Header. The old 
reading books had been in use about ten years, and we had the 
feeling that a change was not only desirable, but absolutely nec- 
essary for their highest interest. 

The Franklin Reader comes highly recommended, and has been 
introduced in quite a number of surrounding towns. Here we 
would like to call attention to the pains taken by some of our 
teachers with the reading, the results of which are praise worthy, 
indeed; and if we were to offer a suggestion to help along the 
good work, it would be, not to permit a scholar in reading to 
pass over a large number of important words, without having his 
or her attention called to the meaning of them, — a mistake that 
is often noticed. 



22 

A spirit of insubordination has been manifested by some of the 
older scholars in the winter schools. The Committee have ad- 
vised the teachers after trying different methods of discipline, to 
expel such scholars, which has been done in two or three instan- 
ces, with the provision they could return on condition of good 
behavior. These measures have had a good effect, and restored 
peace and prosperity in a good degree. The success of a school 
is often destroyed by the bad influence of one or two unruly 
members, and if they cannot be brought under subjection, the 
good of the school demands their expulsion. 

Most of our schools labor under the great disadvantage of not 
being well classified. There are so many recitations, that the 
teacher can not do justice to any of them; ten or twelve minutes 
to hurry through a lesson, amounts to little more than an apol- 
ogy. There are several reasons for this condition of things: a 
large number of scholars attend only the winter term of school; 
Many are more or less absent every term when they can obtain 
work, and many children receive help and encouragement from 
their parents, and are enabled to progress faster than their 
classes, and dissatisfaction is often expressed if they are not per- 
mitted to. Valid as these reasons appear to be, it is desirable 
that something should be done, some sort of system prescribed 
and adhered to in the making up of classes. 

In looking over the register, we see quite an improvement in 
the punctuality of the scholars, especially in the school at North 
Hatfield, where only two scholars have been tardy the entire year, 
and it is hoped that a like effort may be made, and with as good 
results in every school in town. 

In the exchange of Reading Books, the introduction price of 
the new books was from sixteen to eighty cts. apiece, according 
to the size of the book, and for corresponding old books, we re- 
ceived from six to thirty cts. Whole cost of the exchange, $87.93. 

No. of children betAveen the ages of 5 and 15, 301 

No. reported last year. 313 

Average No. of scholars in all the schools for the year, 275 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 17 

No. of scholars under 5 years of age, 10 

No. of scholars in the winter schools, 278 

No. of American scholars in the winter schools, 67 

No. of Foreign scholars in the " " 208 

No. of Colored scholars in the a a 3 



28 

Names o:F Teachers audi wages paid per 
month, inducting' Tboard. 

Hill Grammar, Fanny Woodard, spring and fall, $26 00 

winter, 28 00 

Hill Primary, Jane M. Cowles, spring, 26 00 

Hill Primary, Carrie L. Warner, fall and winter, 26 00 

Center Grammar, Maria L. Tuttle, spring, 28 00 

Center Grammar, J. E. Whitman, fall, 28 00 

Center Grammar, Jennie M. Stearns, winter, 28 00 

Center Primary, Mary C. Billings, spring, fall and win. , 26 00 
North Hatfield, Alice L. Bartlett, spring, 

" " . " fall and winter, 

West Brook, Cora H. Eaton, spring, 

■." " i( fall and winter, 

West Hatfield, Myra E. Parsons, spring and fall, 

" Irene L. Lyman, winter, 

Average cost per week, including board, 

"'\ " " " " for the year 1873, 



Amount expended for teachers and board, 
" " for wood and coal, 

" " for care of school houses, 



Amount appropriated by the town, 

" received from the State school fund, 

" * i( « dog fund, 1876, 

il unexpended last year, 



Amount of school money expended, 
" " (e unexpended, 



24 00 
26 00 

28 00 

26 00 

28 00 

26 00 

6 67 

8 66 

1720 50 

231 25 

38 43 



$1990 18 


$1800 00 


185 


67 


70 


81 


40 


36 


$2096 


84 


$1990 


18 


106 


66 



$2096 84 



OSCAR BELDEN, i School Committee 

ALVLST L. STRONG, \ of the 

CHARLES L. GRAVES, ) Town of Hatfield 



Is 


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REPORTS 



OF 



The SeuiBotbiun 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending March 1, 1879. 



HATFIELD, MASS.: 
POWER PRESS OF ECONOMICAL PRINTING CO. 

1879. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



We have been unable to keep within the appropriations that 
were given us by the town. By referring to our report, you will 
find that we have expended for Highways and Bridges, $1700.73; 
about $600 of this amount was expended after the December 
freshet. The cost of filling the wash-out near the Hill Bridge, 
was $325. 

For new bridges and repairing old ones, we have paid $409.68; 
building two new ones on the old Depot road, and replacing the 
bridge across the main stream (that was washed away by the 
freshet,) and putting new stringers on the same. We have re- 
planked two of the bridges on the Depot road, and otherwise 
repaired them. Four of the bridges on this road were washed 
away by the flood. We have also built one new bridge near 
David Powers.' Several of the bridges need further repairs this 
year. 

POOR 

$1000 was appropriated for the Poor. We have expended 
$1323.79. Of this amount, about $185 of it should come back 
to us from the State; making $1138.79 that we have actually 
paid for our poor. 



TOWN DEBT. 

The indebtedness of the town amounts to: Richardson, Hill & 
Co.'s Note of $2500, due April 29, 1879, two Notes held by John 
Pickering & Moseley of $1000 and $2000, a Demand Note of 
$1000 held by the First National Bank of Northampton, Select- 
men's orders unpaid, $320.08, and outstanding bills to about $300. 
Total, $7120.08. 

To offset this, we find in the hands of the Treasurer, cash, 
$98.97, a balance due on E.F.Billings' Note of $55.64, due 
from the State on poor account, $185, and State aid, $212, leaving 
a balance of $6568.47 as the indebtedness of the town. 

We have settled with Mr. J. E. Doane, Collector, in full, for 
all taxes placed in his hands for collection. 



EXPENDITURES. 



JE>SLia Old Bills, 1 878. 

Sundry highway bills, 

Almeron Crafts, board D. D. Gardner, 

E. Seward Warner, for enforcing dog law, 
Economical Printing Co., printing town reports, • 
Moses E. Warner, Selectman, 

Roswell Billings, Treasurer, 

H. S. Hubbard, Selectman and Overseer of the poor, 

" Stationery, postage and carrying mail, 

board E. Wells. 
J. E. Doane, order of abatement on taxes, 
H. G. Moore, Selectman, 

F. F. Abbott, board at hospital for Insane, 
A. M. Richmond, " 

James Cronan, sand for North Hatfield school house, 

W. G. Bassett, settlement Draper case, 

E. M. Graves, Mdse., 

E. F. Billings, services as Constable, 

Oscar Belden, school account, 

Dexter Jones, repairs on Town Hall, 

A. M. Peck, work in Cemetery, 



$18 


07 


20 


00 


6 


00 


30 00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


95 


00 


3 


50 


1 


50 


14 46 


46 


00 


30 


00 


39 


65 


18 


00 


485 


05 


1 


00 


4 00 


4 80 


1 


50 


1 


50 



$895 03 



Highway Bills. 



West Hatfield District. — N. T. Abells, Surveyor. 



N. T. Abells, 


labor, 


Ci services as Surveyor, 


Philip Carl, 


labor, 


M. P. Bradford, 


a 


Wm. Miller, 


a 


John Kiley, 


a 


A. E. Strong, 


a 


Henry Dwight, 


" 


John H. Eyan, 


" 


John Vollinger, 


" 


Patrick Boyle, 


a 


John Chandler, 


a 


George Contzlman, 


a 


Andrew Hilbert, 


a 


George Steele, 


a 


Frank Newman, 


a 


a 


clay, 


Wm. Carson, 


labor, 


Fred Carson, 


a 


John Smith, 


it 


Edmund Powers, 


a 


Joseph Kleasoner, 


a 


P. L. Strong & Sons, " 


Adam Doppman, 


'• 


H. S. Porter, 


a 


George Dennis, 


a 


J. A. Cutter, 


sand, 


u 


labor, 


Peter Saffer, 


it 



123 


22 


9 


75 


6 


00 


38 


60 


3 


00 




40 


2 


52 


14 40 


13 


90 


7 


60 


3 


25 


6 


30 


5 


60 




85 


4 


00 


7 


85 


3 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


4 70 


11 


20 


7 


55 


19 


50 


7 


75 


12 


00 


1 


50 


!5 


00 


1 


50 


15 


00 



$356 94 



Hill District. — Pi 


Patrick Mullanny, 


labor, 


M. W. Kingsley, 


a 


J. D. Porter, 


a 


John Kyan, 


a 


L. P. Dole, 


a 


Michael Larkin, 


a 


Horace Shumway, 


a 


J. T. Fitch, 


a 


Thaddeus Graves, 


a 


a 


earth, 


Nelson Allair, 


labor, 


M. E. Warner, 


a 


C. L. Graves, 


a 


John Jandrow, 


a 


Anthony Allair, Jr 


, earth 


it 


labor, 


H. S. Hubbard, 


i t 


E. S. Warner, 


a 


James Porter, 


a 


Maltby, 




H. S. Porter, 


labor, 


Geo. C. Fitch, 


a 


Chas. Wilkie, 


a 



Patrick Mullanny, Surveyor. 



68 


38 


2 


00 


7 


75 


1 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 70 


9 


00 


1 


50 


2 


80 


9 


65 


4 50 


2 


75 


4 


50 


1 


38 


3 


00 


11 


40 


3 


00 


4 


50 


5 


80 


5 


75 


4 75 


1 


62 



$162 23 



District No. 2. — Edwin Brainerd, Surveyor. 
Edwin Brainerd, services as Surveyor, 



labor, 



Anthony Gilbert, 
John Kiley, 
D. W. Wells, 
O. L. Thayer, 
F. H. Bardwell, 
David Billings, 



37 82 
12 98 

5 50 

2 75 

6 00 
1 00 

3 00 
3 00 



Luman Moore, 
John Vollinger, 
Henry Stinglein, 
Michael Hade, 
Michael Dea, 
Geo. Vollinger, 
Israel Morton, 
Silas Porter, 
Moses C. Porter, 
Kobert McGrath, 
Michael Boyle, 
Mrs. 0. Billings, 
F. D. Billings, 
Wm. P. Allis, 
C. K. Morton, 
J. S. Wells, 
Theodore Baggs, 
Patrick Daly, 
Wm. D. Billings, 
Jacob Carl, 



5 


00 


3 


10 


1 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


3 


60 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


70 


1 


65 


6 


00 


2 


23 


3 


00 


9 


00 


4 00 


3 


00 


1 


60 


6 


00 


3 


00 



$138 93 



North Hatfield District. — A. E. Harris, Surveyor. 



E. Harris, labor, 

C. B. Marsh & Son, 

Oscar Belden, 

K. & W. H. Belden, 

George Fiffer, 

Leander Cooley, 

J. W. Field, 

H. G. Moore, 

David Powers, 

A. S. Jones & Sons, 

J. E. Wight, 

A. E. Harris, 



4 40 

6 00 

3 75 
12 70 

25 
1 81 

50 
1 50 

4 35 
10 50 

3 00 
20 80 



Eurotas Morton, labor, 
Elihu Marsh & Sons, 
Lysander Oooley, 
0. S. Graves, 
Eleazer Cooley, 
Frank Mosher, 
H. W. Field, 
H. H. Field, 



5 


50 


4 


00 




71 


3 


50 


1 


33 


4 


00 


1 


80 




50 



$90 90 



Disteict No. 3. — Geo. L. Maesh, Surveyor. 
Edward Proulx, labor, 
John O'Neil, 
Geo. L. Marsh, 
Wm. P. Allis, 
Fred Olevy, 
Lewis Murry, 
Peter Rosebush, 
John Kerr en, 
Frank Price, 
James Breeor, 
James Ryan, 
Wm. Boyle, 
J. D. Brown, 
E. A. Bardwell, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, 



Michael Proulx, 
L. S. Bliss, 
A. M. Peck, 
C. G. Waite, 
John McHugh, 
Fred Carl, 
Wm. B. Langdon, 



earth, 
labor, 



earth, 
labor. 



13 


50 


1 


00 


40 


96 


4 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 




50 


1 


00 


4 00 


2 


45 


4 00 


5 


50 


2 j00 


21 


50 


4 40 


2 


50 


5 


50 


3 


00 


11 


40 


4 00 


3 


20 


5 


50 



$146 41 



10 



West Brook District.— C. B. Dickinson, Surveyor. 

C. B. Dickinson, labor, 38 75 
R. Mosher, 
David Fitzgerald, 
Conrad Wolfram, 
E. 0. Waite, 
Chester AVhite, 
Wm. Kichtmeyer, 
Eleazer Cooley, 
L. S. Crafts, 

D. A. Vining, 
Dwight Morton, 
Morris Fitzgibbons, 

*73 30 



1 


50 


2 


15 


7 


65 


5 


30 


1 


35 


2 


50 


3 


90 


2 


00 


i 


15 




70 




35 



Wash-Out near Hill B:ricig , e. 



E. S. Warner, 


sand, 


(t 


labor. 


Newell Graves, 


a 


Newell Graves, Jr., 


a 


Peter Balice, 


« 


Dick Wheeler, 


(i 


Michael Hade, 


a 


Hosea Wheeler, Jr., 


« 


Fred Wheeler, 


" 


Theodore Porter, 


a 


M. W. Kingsley, 


" 


Joseph Rosebush, 


i( 


Frank Burbey. 


a 


John O'Neil, 


<< 


John Ryan, St., 


a 


Joseph Hibert, 


66 


Hosea Wheeler, 


" 


Selah Wheeler, 


k '*' 


Thaddeus Graves. 


" 



21 40 



4 


50 


1 


80 


2 


00 


8 


10 


4 


05 


2 


60 


1 


35 


2 


50 


5 


20 


6 


00 




70 


2 


70 


2 


70 


4 


00 


3 


80 




50 




50 


8 


10 



11 



Patrick Mullanny, 


labor, 


a 


sand, 


Anthony Allair, Jr. 


, earth, 


H. S. Hubbard, 


sand, 


" 


labor, 


M. E. Warner, 




Geo. W. Warner, 




David Billings, 




Charles Kingsley, 




John McGrath, 




J. D. Porter, 




J. T. Fitch, 




James Porter, 




M. N. Hubbard, 




George Vollinger, 




J. 8. Graves & Son, 




Eichard Fitzgerald, 




A. F. Curtis, 




Lewis Eabboin, 




Mrs. C. Billings, 




Samuel F. Billings, 




a 


old brick, 


R. H. Cowles, 


labor, 


Geo. C. Fitch, 


a 


C. K. Morton, 


a 


D. P. Morton, 


a 


Erastus Billings, 


a 


F. H. Bardwell, 


a 


N. P. Gould, 


stone, 



12 


90 


8 


40 


15 


90 


9 


18 


14 


70 


14 85 


3 


60 


5 


10 


4 50 


2 


15 


13 


20 


12 


30 


8 


10 


5 


40 


2 


■70 


26 


15 


2 


70 


1 


10 


1 


70 


5 


40 


23 


20 


1 


50 


7 


80 


10 


80 


7 


80 


6 


60 


5 


40 


2 


70 


2 


00 



$322 33 



Rodney Smith, 
N. T. Abells, 



Bridges and Railings 

lumber, 

labor, 

railings and spikes, 



118 37 

31 75 
10 85 



12 



John Kiley, 


labor, 


a 


crow-bar lost, 


Henry Dwight, 


labor, 


a 


stone and railings, 


Leander Cooley, 


labor, 


Peter Balice, 


" 


Peter Saffer, 


a 


8. W. Kingsley, 


'- and bolts, 


H. G. Moore, 


a 


" 


lumber and railings, 


John Vollinger, 


labor, 


Lawrence Vollingei 




Frank Newman, 


Si 


David Powers, 


a 


0. E. Morton, 


a 


W. H. Dickinson & Son, plank, 


M. E. Warner, 


lumber, 


0. S. Graves, 


labor, 


H. S. Hubbard, 


a 


a 


lumber, 


E. M. Martin, 


spikes, 


E. S. Warner, 


labor, 


Geo. S. Burt, 


nails and spikes, 


Eufus Ames, 


nails, 


James Cronan, 


labor, 



5 


25 


1 


00 


4 


16 


1 


50 


22 


12 


2 


00 


3 


60 


11 


42 


i 


50 


46 


00 


2 


50 


4 


30 


1 


20 


1 


50 


2 


50 




96 


8 


25 


2 


00 


1 


50 


102 


62 




35 


12 


30 


1 


05 


1 


94 


1 


20 



$409 69 



I?aicl fbr Schools. 

Miss Carrie E. Graves, teaching, Hill, 
Fanny Woodard, 
Lilla H. Peck, 
Mary L. Waite, 
Emma E. Porter, 
Cora H. Eaton, 
Alice L. Bartlett, 
Carrie L. Warner, 



108 50 
19 80 
126 50 
205 00 
216 00 
216 00 
205 50 
126 50 



13 



Miss Delia Bates, 


teaching, 


Myra Parsons, " 




Mr. A. L. Dyer, 


i i 




Peter McHugh, 


sawing wood, 


Geo. Dennis, 


i i 




Henry Vedemyer, 


a 




E. H. Dyer, 


a 




Henry Balice, 


a 




David Powers, 


i i 




A. L. Strong, 


a 




Willie Schroeder, 


janitor, 


Hill, 


Peter Schroeder, 


a 


a 


Fred Cutter, 


a 


West Hatfield, 


Eddie Porter, 


a 


Center, 


George Cooley, 


a 


North Hatfield, 


L. E. Bartlett, 


a 


a 


Joseph Vining, 


a 


West Brook, 


Philip Jubinville, 


a 


a 


W. D. Clapp, 


coal, 




E. M. Martin, 


wood, 




E. C. Waite, 


a 




Crafts, janitor, West Brook, 


Geo. C. Fitch, 


wood, 




Charles E. Hubbard, " 




A. L. Strong, 


a 




C. L. Graves, 


drawing i 


coal, 


Philip Carl, 


i i 




Joseph Kleasoner, 







I*iil>lic Library. 

Kufus Ames, for oil, 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 
E. F. Billings, services as Librarian, 



84 


00 


78 


00 


84 00 


2 


50 


3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


25 


1 


00 


8 37 


1 


50 


1 


20 


6 


50 


6 


00 


20 


75 




55 


4 


80 


2 


25 


2 


80 


50 


57 


26 


30 


17 


50 


14 


00 


1 


50 


3 


50 


10 


00 


22 


92 


2 


00 


6 


77 


1 


00 


$1694 33 




78 


138 


78 


25 


00 



$164 56 



14 



State Aid. 



John W. Madison, 
Mrs. U. B. Graves, 
Clarissa Vining, 
Kuth Dennis, 
Minerva Anderson, 



26 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 



$218 00 



Town Aid, 1 878. 



Mrs. U. B, Graves, 
Clarissa Vining, 



35 00 

35 00 

$70 00 



Paid, fbr Paupers. 

Support of A. M. Richmond, 

F. F. Abbott, 

Roily Wells, 

Pomeroy Doppman, 

David D. Gardner, 

Barney McHugh, 

Mrs. A. Taylor, 

Mrs. Jane Stone, 

Joseph Proulx, 

Mrs. Sarah Williams, State Pauper, 

George Hathaway, Reform School, 

James Shea, 

Michael Ryan, 

Mrs. Gertie Murry, 

C. Shroeder, 

Newell Graves, 
Wm. S. Briggs, tramps, 
H. S. Hubbard, 
C. Schroeder, " 



169 75 

171 33 

91 42 

171 95 

100 98 

30 00 

32 00 

71 15 

5 03 

115 55 

48 00 

39 45 

39 25 

11 00 

23 25 

24 60 
8 80 

50 
20 85 



15 



Dr. C. M. Barton, medical attendance Mrs. Williams, 

" " " Mrs. P. Doppman, 

" " " Mrs. Beaugor, 

D. D. Gardner, 
" alcohol ex., tools, etc., P. Doppman, 

W. L. Smith & Co., coffin for D. D. Gardner, 
" coffin and comfortables, 

Jared Remington, care of Oliver Irvin, 

Joseph Pocket, " " and digging grave, 

W. L. Smith & Co. , coffin for Oliver Irvin, 

E. M. Graves. Mdse. " 

A. M. Peck, Sexton D. D. Gardner, 



Miscellaneous Expenses, 



Wm. D. Billings, 
C. L. Warner, 
Eurotas Morton, 
Wm. D. Billings, 
A. L. Strong, 
C. L. Graves, 
E. M. Martin, 
Roswell Billings, 
John E. Doane, 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Assessor, 



Clerk, 

School Committee, 



Treasurer, 
Collector, 



2 


00 


an, 32 


00 


8 


00 


39 


00 


6 


74 


13 


00 


14 50 


15 


50 


ive, 6 


25 


7 


00 




94 


4 00 



$1323 79 



60 


00 


56 


25 


51 


50 


25 


00 


29 


50 


23 


75 


20 


00 


35 


00 


100 


00 



$401 00 



School Expenses. 



C. L, Graves, 


crayons, 


7 00 


a 


repairs, 


11 00 


A. L. Strong, 


repairs on school houses, 


9 70 



16 



E. M. Martin, crayons, books and supplies, 
" repairs, 

Mrs. John Leary, cleaning Center school house, 
John Burke, " school house, 
Fitzgibbons, " " " West Brook, 

C. Murphy, " « « No. Hatfield, 

Jare Brown, repairs, West Hatfield, 

Leander Crafts, whitewashing W. Brook school house, 

I. R. Clark, glass, 

Wm. Dougherty, repairs, 

Rufus Ames, books, etc., 

Bridgman & Childs, " 

Eames & Sprague, supplies, 



7 


50 


2 


15 


3 


50 


1 


50 


2 


50 


1 


50 


23 


00 


3 


00 


8 


61 


5 


95 


IV 

i 


92 


1 


85 


21 


83 



$118 51 



Incidental Expenses. 

Economical Printing Co., order book and tax bills, 

Kizer & Hamlin, Soldiers and Sailors' record, 

Rufus Ames, oil and nails, Town Hall, 

Clark W. Bryan & Co., Collector's book, 

S. W. Kingsley, repairing scraper and fire extinguisher, 

Horace Shumway, expressage, 

Gazette Printing Co., blanks for Assessors, 

Alvin Dinsmore, abatement '77 tax, 

Nelson Allair, work in cemetery, 

H. G. Moore, " 

A. M. Peck, 

" recording deaths, 

J. E. Wight, hedge plants for cemetery, 
Theodore Porter, care Town Hall, 

W. D. Billings, recording deaths, births and marriages, 
Eames & Sprague, Town Hall, 
H. S. Hubbard, shingles, boards and labor. Town Hall, 

" paper and check book, 

" expenses to Spring'd, twice, pauper case, 

Michael Kennedy, damages on highway. 



7 


75 


50 


00 


1 


18 


1 


25 


14 


40 


7 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


3 


44 


3 


00 


3 


00 


iV 
i 


00 


8 


25 




50 


26 


20 




38 


15 


93 




85 


5 


30 


3 


75 



17 



L. S. Crafts, care watering tank, 
J. E. Doane, services as Constable, 

" postage, 

" work on Town Hall, 

Wm. Dougherty, painting hearse, 



Interest JPaid. 

John Pickering & Mosely, 
Kichardson, Hill & Co., 
First National Bank, Northampton, 
Discount on Taxes, 



5 


00 


3 


00 


2 


40 


7 


25 


10 


00 



$190 83 



71 


72 


192 


50 


10 


60 


168 


64 



1443 46 



Bills Payable. 

Treasurer's Notes, John Pickering & Mosely, 3000 00 

" Kichardson, Hill & Co., ' 2500 00 

" First National Bank, Northampton, 1000 00 



$6500 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



Receipts, 1878. 

John Pickering & Mosely, 4800 00 

First National Bank of Northampton, 1900 00 

Corporation Tax, 135 04 

Bank Tax, 1545 52 

State Aid, 192 00 

Dog fund, 63 78 

Massachusetts School fund, 183 72 

School Committee, 10 03 

Rent of Town Hall, 3 00 

5 



18 



Mrs. Minerva Gardner, for D. D. Gardner. 

Oliver Irvin, State, 

Assessment of Taxes, 1878, 

Interest on Taxes, from J. E. Doane, 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, March, 1878, 



3 


00 


7 


75 


5665 


90 


18 40 


1705 


73 


$16233 


87 



lilxpeuclit :ui* eft, 187§. 

Selectmen's orders paid, 

State Tax, 

County Tax, 

Discount on Taxes, 

Interest on Notes, 

Assessors* order of abatement, 

Kichardson, Hill & Co.'s Note, 

John Pickering & Mosely's Note, 

First National Bank of Northampton, 



Cash in Treasurers hands. 



6454 


70 


710 


00 


1810 


74 


168 


64 


274 


82 


16 


00 


2000 


00 


3800 


00 


900 00 


$16134 


90 


98 


97 


$16233 


87 



H. S. HUBBARD, ) Select?nen 
O. C. WELLS, [ of 
H. G. MOORE. ) Hatfield. 

ROSWELL BILLINGS. Treasurer. 
Hatfield. March. 8. 1879. 



19 



-Appropriations for 187§. 



Schools, 

Highways and Bridges, 

Poor, 

Contingent Expenses, 

Town Aid, 

Public Library, 

Record Soldiers and Sailors, 

Interest, 



1500 


00 


1000 


00 


1000 


00 


500 


00 


70 00 


150 


00 


75 


00 


250 


00 


s£4545 


00 



T^ist of Jurors reported toy the Selectmen, 



Charles A. Jones, 
Charles E. Wilkie, 
Alvin L. Strong, 
Rufus H. Cowles. 
Edward Curtis, 
Silas S. Dwight, 
Samuel P. Billings. 
Nelson Allair, 
Edmund Powers. 
M. P. Bradford. 
Michael Larkin. 
E. M. Martin. 



John E. Doane, 
Joseph S. Wells, 
Roswell Billings, 
Wm. D. Billings, 
O. Stanley Graves, 
Jonathan S. Graves, 
John T. Fitch, 
George A. Billings. 
Luman Moore, 
Silas G. Hubbard. 
Patrick Mullannv. 



20 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH, 17, 1879. 

Article 1st. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2kd. — To choose all necessary town officers for the year en- 
suing, including one person for member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3rd. — To choose an Elector under the will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4th. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submitted 
by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5th. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen and School 
Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6th. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7th. — To take action in relation to raising money to defray 
the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8th. — To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintainance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensu- 
ing year. 

Art. 9th. — To see what action the town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the coming year. 

Art. 10th. — To see if the town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the town. 

Art. 11th. — -To see if the town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library, and choose a Committee for the same. 

Art. 12th. — To see if the town will accept of "An Act in rela- 
tion to the election of Selectmen and Assessors of Towns," 
Approved by the General Court, May 15, 1878. 

Art. 13th. — To see what action the town will take concerning 
Truant children. 



Annual Report of the 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

For the Year Ending March, 1879. 



In the discharge of the duties assigned them, the Board of 
School Committee submit to the town their Annual Keport. 

It has been our aim during the year now closed, to confine our 
expenditures within the sum appropriated for schools; therefore, 
we have practised economy in every thing possible, consistent 
with the best interests of the schools and the future public good. 

The No. of teachers employed, 10; No. retained throughout 
the year, 4. A very large percentage of our teachers have been 
home-made, graduates of Smith Academy. They have, taken as 
a whole, been very successful. No one has been a failure; yet, 
some have been more successful than others in discipline. We 
have employed some teachers from other towns, who have been 
equally rewarded with success. All have seemed to take a deep 
interest in their work of instruction, and, in the main, good dis- 
cipline has been the rule rather than the exception. Much in- 
terest has been taken in the preservation of the school property. 
We do not propose to single out any who have partially failed, 
nor those that achieved the greatest success, but make our criti- 
cisms and commendations in general terms; as more evil than 
good would naturally arise from personal allusion. 

We have put our shoulders to the wheel, from time to time, 
with the teachers, and done all in our ability to correct all mis- 
takes and push forward the education of our pupils in good 
morals as well as in book knowledge; although, in many respects 
we feel that we have erred. 



24 

Many teachers are far more anxious how to govern than how 
to teach; forgetting that the great secret of good discipline, is 
good teaching. Often, the pupil who is the most troublesome 
when uninterested and careless, becomes a most earnest student 
when rightly directed and inspired by a true teacher. The 
teacher should lead, instead of drive; teach, instead of hear reci- 
tations; encourage originality of thought and method, instead of 
requiring the exact language and matter of the book. She 
should be the earnest friend of every pupil, rather than the 
stern, unyielding monarch. One original thought of the pupil 
is worth a score committed to memory from the book. This is 
a question that can not be too strongly emphasized, and one 
which is much overlooked by many who are teaching. If the 
pupil comes to the recitation with his or her lesson passably well 
committed to memory, it is thought to be enough, without in- 
vestigating the matter to see whether the pupil has any ideas of 
his or her own on the subject in question. 

Considerable time has been taken up with reading and spelling 
during the year, and with much profit to the pupils. These 
branches are apt to be neglected by teachers and scholars, as 
many have a strong desire to get up higher on the ladder, little 
realizing the mistake that they have made, until it is, in many 
cases, too late to be remedied. These branches, and all others 
in the fundamental principles of the rudiments of education, can 
not be too thoroughly understood; hence the importance of em- 
ploying teachers thoroughly versed in their occupation. Yet 
something more is needed. The co-operation of the parents with 
the teacher is an important element. Unless the sympathy of 
parents is in harmony with the purpose of the teacher, the school 
is shorn of much success. 

Judicious people do not frequently point the exceptional blem- 
ishes of an exceptionally excellent school to their neighbors, 
knowing what evil will result from "sowing tares among the 
wheat;" but discreet people strive to help mould and make a 
school, — not to mar it and discourage its teacher. There is no 
better way of showing your interest in the welfare of your child- 
ren, than by frequent visits to the school-room. It inspires the 
pupils to nobler and grander purposes of thought and action, 
and stimulates the teacher to adopt better methods of operation. 



25 

The most of our schools labor under great disadvantage, 
through the negligence of some of the parents to provide suffi- 
cient text books for their children. Some scholars, in cases of 
need, have been furnished at the expense of the town; yet others, 
who ought to come fully equipped, are but partially supplied; 
consequently, great annoyance to the teacher to borrow books 
for them, or devise some other plan to keep them, who have 
nothing to do, quiet. 

We shall not receive the full benefit of the money expended for 
schools, until the town buys and owns all books used in our pub- 
lic schools; thereby giving all classes a free and equal chance for 
the improvement of the mind. Your committee sugest, that it 
would be wise economy for the town, to purchase at wholesale 
prices and supply all deficiencies as they occur; each book to be 
labeled with proper rules for protection and loaned to the pupil. 
Many towns in the State have adopted this plan with success. 

An examination of some of our school registers, show at a 
glance, that the record of attendance for the year now closed, is 
below mediocrity; for which various reasons can be given: The 
summer and winter terms were unavoidably broken up by the in- 
visible hand of God, in prostration of teachers and scholars by 
sickness; but aside from sickness, we do not, as a town, approxi- 
mate to a good degree of punctuality in attendance. In the 
school year of 1876-7, of the 342 towns and cities in the state, 
we rank the 305th town in percentage of attendance; while 304 
rank better, and only 37 are below us. 

It does seem to your committee, that considerable absence and 
tardiness might be avoided if all parents were seeking for the 
highest good of their children, instead of the small pittance that 
they can earn at home. Indifference is sometimes met with, 
where parents do not, or can not, make their children go to 
school; and yet others send their children, as they suppose, to 
school, but they do not go there; but go to some pond where 
there is skating or some other recreation. 

While we have brought these facts to your notice, we wish to 
remind you, that we have laws in our State for such cases, which 
should be made to bear upon them with all their force. 

7 



26 



The Legislature of 1873, passed an act as follows: — 
"Each city and town shall make all needful provisions and ar- 
rangements concerning habitual truants and children between 
the ages of seven and fifteen years who may be found wandering 
about in the streets or public places of such city or town, having 
no lawful occupation or business, not attending school, and 
growing up in ignorance; and shall also make such by-laws as 
shall be most conducive to the welfare of such children, and to 
the good of such city or town; and shall provide suitable places 
for the confinement, discipline and instruction of such children : 
provided, that said by-laws shall be approved by the Superior 
court or a Justice thereof, or by the Judge of probate of the 
county. " 

When we think of the pauperism, vice and crime, which igno- 
rance, is in a large degree accountable, it does seem to your com- 
mittee that the town should use all the means available to en- 
hance the value of our public schools; therefore, we shall present 
at the annual town meeting, a form of by-laws concerning truant 
children, to be acted upon by the town. 



KOLL OF HONOR 

The following named scholars attended school the entire year 
without an absent or tardy mark: 

Maria Carter, Gilbert E. Morton. 



No. of children between the ages of 5 and 15, 293 

No. reported last year, 301 

No. of children who have attended school, 295 

Average number attending each term, 259 

Average attendance, 203 

No. of children over 15, 12 

No. of children under 5, 4 



27 



NAMES OF TEACHERS AND WAGES PAID PEE 
MONTH, INCLUDING BOARD. 

Hill Grammar, Fanny Woodard, part summer, 24 00 

" " Carrie Graves, remainder " 24 00 

" " " fall, 22 00 

" A. L. Dyer, winter, 24 00 210 50 

Hill Primary, Carrie L. Warner, summer, 24 00 

fall, 22 00 

Emma E. Porter, winter, 24 00 210 50 

Center Grammar, Mary L. Waite, sum. and fall, 22 00 

" " " " winter, 24 00 205 00 

Center Primary, Lilla H. Peck, sum. and fall, 22 00 

Myra E. Parsons, winter, 24 00 204 50 

North Hatfield, Alice L. Bartlett, sum. and fall, 22 00 

" winter, 24 00 204 50 

West Brook, Cora H. Eaton, sum., fall and win., 24 00 216 00 

West Hatfield, Emma E. Porter, sum. and fall, 24 00 

" Delia Bates, winter, 24 00 216 00 



Amount appropriated for schools, 

" Received from State School Fund, 

from Dog Fund, 1877, 
" " from School Committee of 

Northampton, for tuition, 
Amount unexpended last year, 

" received from Rufus Swift, for tuition, 



$1500 00 

183 72 

58 18 

12 00 
18 73 
15 00 

$1787 63 



Amount expended for teachers and board, $1469 80 

for wood and coal, 177 18 

" • " for care of school houses, 46 35 

" for Mdse. and apparatus for schools, 1 00 

Balance unexpended, 93 30 



$1787 63 



ALVIN L. STRONG, 
CHARLES L. GRAVES, 
EZRA M. MARTIN, 
Hatfield, March, 1879. 



School Committee 

of the 
Town of Hatfield. 



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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND 



JLJLJ&I&^LJE&'^r (DOMMITOPIEIE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 
For the Year Ending; March 1, 1880, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. : 
STEAM PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY, 

1880. 



Selectmen's Report 



The time has again arrived when it is the duty of the 
Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor to report to the 
voters of the town their doings, and how the appropria- 
tions of the town, for the past year, have been expended. 
It is our desire to report to you in a way that you may 
know where every dollar of your money has gone, so that 
each voter can see and approve or disapprove, as he likes. 
The appropriations made for the year were not quite 
large enough, in some accounts, to carry us through, so 
that we were obliged to exceed ; but taking the appro- 
priations as a whole we have not exceeded, as you will 
see by a careful examination of our report. 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

One thousand dollars was appropriated for these ac- 
counts, seven hundred for highways and three hundred 
for bridges. We have expended for bridges, $462.19 ; 
highways, $874.15. 

On a close examination of our bridges, we found eight 
or ten of them in bad condition, and we were obliged to 
replank eight, and partially replank several more. We 
have rebuilt abutments on two bridges on the Depot 
road, and have otherwise repaired them. 



4 
POOR. 

This branch of town business requires a great deal of 
patience, and, as is well known, is the hardest and most 
unsatisfactory of all town business, but we have tried to 
labor faithfully, so that we might do justice both to the 
town and to the poor. We have aided forty different 
ones during the past year. We have paid for this account, 
$1,218.15 ; of this amount, $31.93 that we have paid for 
B. Perham, will come back to us from the State, as we 
find that he is a State pauper. 



TOWN DEBT. 

The indebtedness of the town amounts to John Pick- 
ering & Moseley's note of $2,000, due June 3d, 1880 ; 
and two notes held by the State Treasurer of $3,500 and 
$1,000, due April 11th, 1880, and August 20th, 1880; and 
outstanding bills to about $350. Total, $6,850. 

To offset this, we find in the hands of the Treasurer, 
cash $1,035.25 ; a balance due on E. F. Billings' note of 
$41.53; due from State on poor account, $27.07; and 
State aid, $276.87, leaving a balance of $5,469.28 as the 
indebtedness of the town. Decreasing the indebtedness 
of the town, $1,650.80 

H. S. HUBBARD, ) Selectmen 
H. GK MOORE, \ of 

C. B. DICKINSON, ) Hatfield. 




EXPENDITUEES. 



PAID OLD BILLS, 1878. 

Sundry highway bills, 

H. G-. Moore, services Selectman, 

0. C. Wells, 

H. S. Hubbard, " " 

" " board J. Remington and Irvin, 

Dr. 0. M. Barton, medical attendance for Mrs. Sarah 

Williams and 0. Irvin, 
Horace Shumway, expressage, 
L. H. Kingsley, printing town report, . 

" " order book and bills, 

" " printing for Library, 

A. L. Strong, services Schpol Committee, 
Slate & Baker, for P. Doppmann, 
City of Springfield, 0. Childs, 
Wm. Dougherty, repairs Town Hall, 
0. C. Wells, 

Rufus Ames, oil and chimneys, 
Mrs. A. Taylor, 
Moses W. Kingsley, sand, 



676 05 


45 


00 


45 


00 


80 


00 


17 


50 


45 


00 


2 


00 


31 


05 


4 45 


1 


00 


6 


75 


4 


90 


1 


50 


1 


25 


1 


00 


4 56 


6 


00 


1 47 



$374 48 



6 
HIGHWAY BILLS. 

Hill District. — Patrick Mullanny, Surveyor. 



Paid Patrick Mullanny, labor, 


$93 95 


Joseph Baker, " 


3 68 


John Ryan, Sr., " 


4 85 


Michael Larkin, " 


2 00 


E. Seward Warner, " 


6 00 


" " sand, 


60 


H. S. Porter, labor, 


22 50 


H. S. Hubbard, 


14 50 


Moses W. Kingsley, " 


1 70 


C. L. Graves, 


2 80 


J. D. Porter, 


19 72 


" sand, 


4 85 


C. Schweder, labor, 


38 


James Porter, labor, 5.30 ; sand, 35c, 


5 65 


S. D. Porter, labor, 


1 00 


J. S. Graves & Son, " 


9 00 


Geo. 0. Fitch & Son, " 


4 00 


John Gendrou, " 


7 85 


Mack La Mountain, " 


50 


Ohas. E. Kingsley, " 


2 00 


M. N. Hubbard, 


1 40 


M. E. Warner, 


12 85 


Moses W. Kingsley, " 


1 80 


John Ryan, tf 


1 30 


John Gorman, " 


2 00 


Horace Shumway, " 


7 20 


Nelson Allair, labor, 7.00 ; sand, 1.65, 


8 65 


E. S. Warner, labor, 


1 80 


J. T. Fitch, 


8 25 


A. Allair, Jr., 


90 


" " clay, 


1 10 



$254 78 



District No. 3. — Fred Carl, Surveyor. 



Fred Carl, labor, 

Edward Proulx, " 

John McHugh, 

L. S. Waite, 

0. d Waite, 

Lewis Murray, " 

W. H. Dickinson & Son, " 

W. P. Allis, 

Theodore Baggs, " 

A. M. Peck, 

James Breeor, " 

John Kenen, " 

James Ryam, (( 

Wm. B. Langdon, " 

L. S. Bliss, 



$42 


50 


5 


50 


4 50 




75 


6 


00 


1 


50 


18 


00 


4 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


7 


30 


2 


00 


4 00 


1 


00 


4 


55 



$106 10 



District No. 2. — Edwin" Brainbrd, Surveyor. 

Paid J. D. Billings, labor, $22 60 

David Billings, " 

George Steele, " 
J. S. Wells, 

Theodore Baggs, " 

Charles K. Morton, " 

Henry Stinglein, " 

George a Vollinger. " 

Lumon Moore, " 
S. F. Billings, 

Edwin Brainerd, " 

John McHugh, " 

John Batzold, " 
F. D. Billings, 

Mrs. C. M. Billings, " 

JaGob Carl, " 

John A. Billings, " 

$98 33 



2 


00 


5 


15 


1 


80 


1 


57 


1 


57 


1 


00 


1 


20 


5 


10 


5 


00 


32 


34 


2 


40 




50 




53 


2 


77 


8 


60 


4 20 



West Hatfield District. - 


— M. P. Bradford, Surveyor. 


Paid N. T. Abells, 


labor, 


$31 25 


M. P. Bradford, 


a 


65 00 


J. A. Cutter, 


it 


6 50 


Wm. Carson, 


a 


4 00 


David B. Curtis, 


ti 


2 50 


Peter Stoter, 


(< 


2 50 


Philip Carl, 


a 


15 00 


Mrs. J. Vollinger, " 


1 00 


Joseph Kleasoner, " 


1 30 


Peter Sailer, 


a 


6 02 


Henry D wight, 


(C 


8 00 


John Ryan, 


(( 


7 80 


P. L. Strong & Sons, " 


5 40 


Frank Newman, 


te 


1 00 


Joseph Stoter, 


iC 


1 00 


Adam Doppmann, " 


3 00 


John Batzold, 


a 


2 00 


Fred Wagner, 


te 


30 




$163 57 


North Hatfield District.— 


-O. Stanley Graves, Surveyor. 


0. Stanley Graves, labor, 


$34 31 


C. B. Marsh & Son, * 




10 90 


Edwin Harris, ' 




3 15 


John W. Field, 




77 


H. G. Moore, ' 




3 60 


Leander Cooley, ' 




8 82 


Lysander Cooley, * 




1 55 


Eleazer F. Cooley, * 




4 50 


Dennis Cooley, ' 




4 00 


Charles D. Bartlett, ' 




2 25 


S. D. Bartlett, 




1 00 


A. S. Jones & Sons, i 




15 00 


R. & W. H. Belden, < 




14 75 


Eurotas Morton, ' 




7 00 


E. W. Field, ' 




3 30 


Henry H. Field, ' 




4 50 


David Powers, ■ 




•2 70 



$122 10 



9 



West Brook District. — D. A. Vising, Svrveyor. 



H. R. Graves, 


labor, 


Wm. S. Briggs, * 


a 


Horace Waite, 


n 


tt a 


posts, 


D. A. Vining, 


labor, 


Conrad Wolfran, 


n 


Philip Jubenoille, 


tt 


Dwight Morton, 


Si 


David Fitzgerald, 


it 


Reuben Mosher, 


tt 


Michael Clancy, 


it 


C. B. Dickinson, 


tt 


L. S. Crafts, 


ft 



$17 00 


4 00 


14 00 


1 62 


62 75 


4 70 


3 00 


2 50 


1 00 


1 00 


2 40 


11 00 


4 30 



$129 27 



BRIDGE ACCOUNT. 



L. S. Burt, for nails, $1 92 

Paid George W. Warner, lumber, 22 42 

E. M. Martin, for spikes, 77 

C. G. & E. A. Crafts, for plank, 23 11 

Rodney Smith, " . 55 17 

Henry G. Moore, " 20 83 

O. Stanley Graves, " 16 09 

J. C. Clark, for cement, 13 80 

H. S. Hubbard, for lumber, 104 17 

M. P. Bradford, for labor, 51 00 

" " board L. Bradford, spikes, &c, 8 00 

N. T. Abells, labor, 25 50 

Silas S. Dwight, freight on cement, 5 38 

John Batzold, labor, 10 00 

William Carson, " 9 30 

.Peter Saffer, " 11 50 

Boardman & Pippin, iron, 1 25 
2 



10 



Paid J. H. Howard, spikes, &c., 
Philip Carl, labor, 
E. H. Woods, plank, 
Edwin Bardwell, stone work, 
Levi Bradford, " " 
Fred Wagner, labor, 
Joseph Kleasoner, " 
C. B. Dickinson, " 



$6 25 


3 


50 


23 


53 


4 00 


22 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 


20 


00 



$462 19 



PAID FOR POOR. 

Support of A. M. Richmond, 
F. F. Abbott, 

" Emily Brenette, 

" Michael Ryan and wife, 

" Mrs. Gertie Murray, 

" Mrs. Sarah Williams, 

" Mrs. Jane Stone, 

" Mrs. Lysander Chaffih, 
B. Perham, 

" Joseph Proulx, 

" Alice Wheeler's baby, 

" Bertie and Penny Wheeler, Reform School, 
Watson Smith & Co., coffins for Alice and Lilie Wheeler, 
A. M. Peck, sexton " " 

Minerva Gould, care " " 

Supplies, 

Mrs. Arthur Taylor, 
Agitor Permendo, 
Daniel Martin, 
Francis Ballau, 
Henry G. Moore, tramps, 
C. Schweder, 
Support of P. Doppmann and family, 



$182 


81 


172 


46 


112 


76 


59 


50 


52 


00 


34 50 


86 


00 


124 


68 


31 


93 


3 


13 


57 50 


43 


40 


r, 16 


00 


7 00 


7 50 


3 


32 


15 


00 


7 00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


1 


20 


66 


40 


131 


56 



$1,218 15 



11 



PAID FOR SCHOOLS. 



George W. Warner, wood, 

E. H. Dyer, sawing wood, 

Henry Cutter, " 

Patsey Whalen, " 

Albert Dyer, teaching, Hill, 

Miss Laura Clapp, " " 
" Nellie Clapp, " 
" Cora H. Eaton, " 

" " " teaching, West Brook, 

" Alice L. Bartlett, teaching, No. Hatfield, 
" Lilla H. Peck, 

" « " " West Hatfield, 

" Sarah E. Loom is, " Center, 

" Myra E. Parsons, " West Brook, 

" Mary L. Waite, " Center, 

" Carrie L. Warner, " 
" Ellen Miller, 
" Nellie A. Dwight, " West Hatfield, 

John Smith, janitor, 

L. E. Bartlett, 

E. M. Martin, 

Eddie Porter] " 

George Porter, " 

Freddie Allair, 

Joseph Kleasoner, " 

Peter Schweder, " 

Charles T. Parsons, coal, 

W. D. Clapp, 

D. A. Vining, 

John McHugh, drawing coal, 

E. M. Martin, 

C. L. Graves, " 

G. C. Fitch & Son, wood, 

Horace Waite, wood and sawing, 



$11 


00 


2 


75 


3 


40 


1 


00 


72 


00 


205 


00 


60 


00 


84 00 


42 


00 


156 


00 


60 


00 


66 


00 


66 


00 


174 00 


132 


00 


139 


00 


84 


00 


133 


00 


1 


50 


1 


05 


10 


95 


12 


75 


7 50 


9 


50 


7 25 




50 


17 


59 


27 54 


19 


07 


4 00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


7 00 


43 


40 



$1,667 85 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 



48 


00 


48 


00 


132 


87 


20 


00 



12 
STATE AID. 

Paid Mrs. N. B. Graves, $48 00 

Mrs. Ruth Dennis, 
Mrs. Minerva Anderson, 
James Shea, 
John W. Madison, 

$296 87 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

E. F. Billings, librarian, 

Wm. P. Allis, wood and sawing, 

E. M. Graves, oil, 

Mrs. John Leary, cleaning library, 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 



$25 


00 


5 


00 




32 


1 


00 


116 


70 



$148 02 



Town Officers. 




Wm. D. Billings, Assessor, 


$57 50 


S. D. Porter, " 


51 25 


R. P. Smith, 


51 25 


Roswell Billings, Treasurer, 


50 00 


Wm. D. Billings, Clerk, 


50 00 


C. L. Graves, School Committee, 


29 00 


J. S. Wells, 


25 00 


E. M. Martin, " 


21 50 


John E. Doane, Collector, 


100 00 



$435 50 



13 

SCHOOL-HOUSE REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

J. S. Wells, repairs on school-houses, 

C. L. Graves, 

Morris Fitzgibbons, (s 

N. T. Abells, ' 

Wm. Dougherty, " 

H. H. Bangs, 

S. W. Kingsley, " 

L. S. Crafts, 

J. F. Green, repairs on black boards, 

C. L. Graves, books, crayons and supplies, 

E. M. Martin, " " " 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 

E. M. Graves, 

E. M. Martin, cleaning school-house, 

Eames & Sprague, supplies for school-houses, 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Theodore Porter, care town hall, 
N. T. Abells, repairing road scraper, 
Geo. S. Phelps, " " " 

Patrick Boyle, land damage, 
A. M. Peck, labor in cemetery, 
Chas. A. Wight, " 
L. S. Crafts, 

(i care water tank, 
Metcalf & Co., blanks for assessors, 
Clark W. Bryan & Co., tax book, 
L. H. Kingsley, tax bills, 
Wm. D. Billings, postage and dog license, 
H. S. Hubbard, repairs on town hall, 
I. R. Clark, glass, " " 

Wm. Dougherty, repairs, " " 
J. E. Doane, " " " 

J. T. Fitch, " " " 



$20 07 


7 00 


2 


50 


10 


16 


4 


10 


8 


15 


8 


05 


8 


90 


24 


14 


12 


80 


20 27 


18 


90 


17 


57 


1 


25 


9 


90 



$173 76 



$1 35 


3 00 


33 00 


5 00 


13 37 


3 00 


8 24 


5 00 


5 00 


1 08 


3 85 


2 50 


4 25 


8 00 


4 30 


3 25 


2 00 



$3 25 


8 00 


4 10 


1 25 


6 25 


4 00 


1 80 


es, 23 65 



14 

E. S. Warner, notifying town officers, 

E. F. Billings, services as constable, 

Horace Shu m way, expressage, 

M. H. Spaulding & Co., crow-bar, 

A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 

H. S. Hubbard, paper, postage, and carrying mail, 

John E. Doane, stamps and paper, 

Wm. D. Billings, recording births, deaths and marriages, 23 65 

$158 49 



INTEREST PAID. 

John Pickering & Moseley, * 

Richardson, Hill & Co., 

Hide and Leather Bank, 

State Treasurer, 

First National Bank, Northampton, 

Discount on Taxes, 



$163 


29 


68 


45 


22 


50 


107 50 


110 


13 


106 


86 



$578 73 



BILLS PAYABLE. 

Treasurer's Notes, State Treasurer, $4,500 00 

" " John Pickering & Moseley, 2,000 00 

$6,500 00 



15 




[RECAPITULATION. 




Receipts, 1879. 




Cash in Treasurer's hands, March 1st, 1879. 


$98 97 


Corporation Tax, 


171 19 


Bank Tax, 


1,386 01 


State Aid, 


192 00 


Eelief of indigent soldiers and sailors, 


23 45 


State Poor, 


37 08 


Mrs. Sarah Williams' Estate, 


51 34 


Rent of Town Hall, 


8 00 


Anthony Allair, old plank, 


1 25 


S. W. Kingsley, cement, 


1 65 


Massachusetts School Fund, 


179 02 


School Committee, 


15 00 


E. F. Billings, paid on note, 


18 00 


State Treasurer, 


4,500 00 


First National Bank, 


1,000 00 


John Pickering & Moseley, 


2,000 00 


Town of Palmer, 


4 86 


Dog Fund, 


47 00 


Assessment of Taxes, 1879, 


7,649 30 


Interest on taxes, from J. E. Doane, 


19 86 


E. M. Graves, sale of school books, 


11 63 



$17,415 61 

* 
Expenditures, 1879. 



Old orders, 
State Tax, 
County Tax, 
Discount on Taxes, 
Interest on Notes, 
Richardson, Hill & Co. 's Note, 
John Pickering & Moseley, Note, 
Hide and Leather Bank, " 
First National Bank, " 



$318 78 


355 


00 


1,763 


09 


106 


86 


471 


87 


2,500 


00 


2,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 



id 



Selectmen's orders paid, 

Assessors order of abatement, 

First National Bank, note and interest, 



Cash in Treasurer's hands, 



H. S. HUBBARD, 
H. G. MOORE, 
C. B. DICKINSON, 



ROSWELL BILLINGS, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 4th, 1880. 



$5,809 46 

44 63 

1,010 67 


$16,380 
1,035 


36 
25 


$17,415 

Selectmen 

of 
Hatfield. 


61 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1879. 



Schools, 

Highways and Bridges, 

Poor, 

Contingent Expenses, 

Town Officers, 

Interest, 

Town Debt, 

Public Library, 

Old Bills, 

Town Aid, 



$1,400 00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


700 


00 


600 


00 


250 


00 


1,000 


00 


150 


00 


600 


00 


70 


00 



$6,770 00 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN, 



Charles E. Wilkie, 
Alvin.L. Strong, 
Rufus H. Cowles, 
Silas S. Dwi^ht, 
Samuel P. Billings, 
Michael Larkin, 
George A. Billings, 
Silas G. Hubbard, 
Henry H. Field, 
Henry R. Graves, 
Charles E. Hubbard, 

Samuel D. 



John E. Doane, 
Roswell Billings, 
Wm. D. Billings, 
O. Stanley Graves, 
Jonathan S. Graves, 
John T. Fitch, 
Otis C. Wells, 
Patrick Mullanny, 
Charles S. Shattuck, 
William C. Dickinson, 
Edward C. Waite, 
Porter. 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN 
MEETING, MARCH 15, 1880. 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary town officers for the 
coming year, including one person for member of the 
School Committee for three years, and one member for 
one year. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the will of the 
late Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as 
submitted by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen and 
School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art- 7. — To take action in relation to raising money 
to defray the necessary expenses of the town for the en- 
suing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the town will adopt for 
the maintenance and repairs of Highways and Bridges 
the ensuing year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the town will take in re- 
lation to the prompt payment of taxes the coming year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the town will raise money to pay 
the outstanding debts of the town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the Public Library, and choose a Committee for 
the same. 

Art. 12. — To see if the town will take action, or 
choose a Committee, to look after the interests of the 
town in regard to the railroad crossings in the town. 

Art. 13. — To see if the town will choose a special po- 
lice for protection against tramps. 



Report of School Committee. 



In presenting our report we feel justified in saying that 
the condition of the schools compares favorably with 
former years. We have, by the strictest economy, been 
able to confine our expenses within the amount appropri- 
ated, which was much smaller than in previous years. 

The whole number of teachers employed, twelve ; num- 
ber retained throughout the year, one. We have, on the 
whole, been very successful in obtaining good teachers, 
and some whose services we have been anxious to retain 
throughout the year, we have been prevented from so 
doing by sickness or other unfavorable circumstances. 

We have, as a rule, had good discipline in the schools, 
but we are aware that in some of the schools it has not 
been quite what it should be, and think it would be 
money well expended to employ good male teachers for 
some of our schools through the winter term. This is 
desirable both for the preservation of order and the pro- 
tection of school property. We have not been able to 
procure good male teachers with the amount of money at 
our disposal. 

The scholars might be advanced much faster and better 
results obtained if the parents would take more interest 
in their children's success, and thus encourage them to 
greater efforts. 

The number of scholars in some of our schools is very 
large, and it is impossible for a teacher to do justice by 



20 

so many. We would call the attention of the people to 
the need of another school-house, which could be located 
so as to accommodate scholars from the Hill, Pantry and 
Center Districts. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

The following named scholars have attended school the 
entire year, without an absent or tardy mark : — 

Haery Abells, Fred. Cooley, 

Albert Benway, • Eugene Jubenville, 
Gilbert Morton, Carrie Smith. 



Wo. of children between the ages of 5 and 15, 323 

No. reported last year, 293 

No. of children who have attended school, 333 

Average number attending each term, 283 

Average attendance, 232 . 

No. of children over 15, 11 

No. of children under 5, 7 



NAMES OF TEACHERS AND WAGES PAID PER 
MONTH, INCLUDING BOARD. 

Hill Grammar, Albert Dyer, summer, 
Nellie L. Clapp, fall, 
" " Cora H. Eaton, winter, 

Hill Primary, Laura H. Clapp, summer, 
" " << " fall, 

" " " " winter, 

Center Grammar, Mary L. Waite, sum. and fall, 24 00 

Ellen Miller, winter, 24 00 216 00 

Center Primary, Sarah E. Loomis, summer, 24 00 

Carrie L. Warner, fall, 22 00 

" " « " winter, ' 24 00 205 00 



:24 


00 






24 00 






24 


00 


$216 


00 


22 


00 






22 


00 






24 


00 


205 


00 



21 



North Hatfield, Alice L. Bartlett, summer, 

Lilla H. Peck, fall, 

" * " Alice L. Bartlett, winter, 

West Brook, Cora H. Eaton, part summer, 

" " Myra E. Parsons, remainder, 

" " " fall and winter, 

West Hatfield, Lilla H. Peck, summer, 
" " Nellie A. Dwight, fall, 

" " " " winter, 

Amount appropriated for schools, 

" Keceived from State School Fund, 

" from Dog Fund, 1878, 
" " from Ruf as Swift for tuition, 

Amount unexpended last year, 



Amount expended for teachers and board, 
'' " " wood and coal, 

" " i( care of school houses, 

Balance unexpended, 



24 


00 






24 00 






24 


00 


216 


00 


24 


00 






24 


00 






24 


00 


216 


00 


22 


00 






22 


00 






24 00 


199 


00 




$1,400 00 






179 


02 






63 


78 






15 


00 




'$1 


93 


30 




,751 


10 




$1,473 


00 






143 


85 






51 


00 






83 


25 



$1,751 10 



CHARLES L. GRAVES, i 

EZRA M. MARTIN, \ Bcll0 ° l 

JOSEPH S. WELLS, S Committee - 



Hatfield, March, 1880. 



Library Report, 



The Committee on the Library submit the following 
report : 

The money appropriated by the town for the Library, 
is expended, for the most part, in three ways : First, in 
meeting the necessary running expenses ; second, in the 
cost of rebinding and repairing old books ; third, in pur- 
chasing new books. 

With the limited amount of money placed at our dis- 
posal, we should ordinarily have very little to devote to 
the last mentioned purpose, meeting general expenses 
and repairing old books; exhausting so large a share of 
the appropriation. 

During the past year, however, no old books have 
been rebound, and consequently more money has been 
devoted to buying new books. Sixty-three volumes have 
been purchased, at a cost of $116.70. 

In buying books, two courses are open to your Com- 
mittee, — to add to the Library works just introduced to 
the public, many of them of passing interest ; or to 
make selection from the works of standard authors. 
We recognize the demand there is for the first by a large 
class of readers, and yet we feel that if the Library is to 
be a permanent good, the great writers of the English 
language ought to find a place on its shelves. 

Very few of the latter class of books have been ob- 



23 

tained of late ; but with a moderate increase of appro- 
priation, your Committee feel that the demand for cur- 
rent literature might be met, and besides a few standard 
books added each year to the Library. 

What is true of all public libraries is true also of the 
library in this town, — the books most sought for are 
books of fiction. It is said, however, on good authority, 
that access to a good library tends to cultivate among 
readers a taste for more substantial literary food. We 
hope that will prove to be the case here. At any rate, 
we feel that our policy ought to be such as to encourage 
the right tendencies and meet the wants of those who 
read, not merely to be entertained, but to be profited 
as well. 

FREDERIC D. BILLINGS, ) 
WILLIAM P. ALLEN, \ Committee, 

R. M. WOODS, J 



REPORTS 



OF 



The SmejEUtmbh 



and 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending March 1, 1881. 



HATFIELD, MASS. : 

L. H. Kingsley, Job Printer. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield: — 

The Selectmen herewith submit their report for the year end- 
ing March 1, 1881. 

SUMMARY. 

• 

State Treasurer's Note, due April 10, 1881, $2,500 00 

" Aug. 20, 1881, 1,000 00 

John Pickering & Mosely's Note, due June 5, 1881, 2,000 00 

Unpaid Orders, 517 00 

Outstanding Bills, 500 00 



$6,517 00 
In hands of Treasurer, $1,519 37 

Balance due on E. F. Billings' Note, 19 44 

Due from State and Military. Aid, 105 00 $1,643 81 



Indebtedness of the Town, $4,873 19 



EXPENDITUEES. 



OLD BILLS. 

Sundry Highway bills, 

C. B. Dickinson, for services as Selectman, 

H. G. Moore, 

H. S. Hubbard, " 

Sundry Poor bills, 

Dr. Seymour, Medical aid to P. Doppman, 

0. M. Barton, " Alice and Lily Wheeler, 

B. Perham, 
" "P. Doppman, 

Chaffin family, 
John.Kleasnor, services as Janitor, 
Eddie Belden, 
J. C. Clark, coal, 
N. T. Abells, glass, putty, &c, 
C. L. Graves, services as School Committee, 
Eames & Sprague, stove pipe, &c, 
French & Kimball, coal, 
H. S. Hubbard, repairs on Town Hall, 
Theodore Porter, care " 

Gazette Printing Co., 
J. E. Doane, abatement of taxes, &c, 
Delano & Hammond, advice to S. G. Hubbard, 



$45 


49 


50 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


161 


33 


37 00 


9 


00 


3 


00 


4 00 


5 


50 


7 


50 


1 


50 


25 


36 


1 


43 


5 


00 


10 


66 


20 


91 


3 


50 


1 


00 


25 


00 


17 


62 


7 


00 



$591 80 



HIGHWAY BILLS. 



Hill District. — G. W. Warner, Surveyor. 



Geo. W. Warner, 

E. S. Warner, 

H. S. Porter, 

W. M. Jones, 

M. W. Kingsley, 

James Porter, 

A. L. Dyer, 

Henry Kingsley, 

Fred Jubinville, 

J. S. Graves & Son, 

G. W. Fitch, 

J. D. Porter, 

M. E. Warner, 

Elisha Hubbard, earth, 

James Breeor, 

Horace Shumway, 

J. T. Fitch, 

H. S. Porter, 



labor, 



$32 22 



11 


35 


5 


50 


7 


50 


4 


00 


4 


50 


1 


25 


1 


00 




60 


3 


00 


8 


00 


10 50 


11 


30 


14 00 




75 


8 


00 


. 5 


00 




75 



$129 22 



District No. 2. — Fred. Pease, Surveyor. 

Fred. Pease, services and labor, 

Fred. Bardwell, 

Theodore Baggs, 

Michael Boyle, 

James Mullins, 

Mrs. E. P. Dickinson, 

Elisha Hubbard, earth and 

James Nolan, 

2 



$42 75 



8 


50 


1 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


4 


00 


3 


50 



Jacob Carl, 
Joseph Shepp, 
Nicholas Powers, 
George Steele, 
Peter Saffer, 
S. G. Hubbard, 
David Billings, 



labor. 



District No. 3. — Fred. Carl, Surveyor. 

Fred. Carl, services and labor, 

James Kyan, 

Edward Proulx, 

John O'Neil, 

Edwin Brainerd, 

John McHugh, 

James 0. Waite, 

A. M. Peck, 

0. & G. L. Marsh, 

James Breeor, 

W. P. Allis, 

John Kerren, 

John B. Byan, 

Lewis Murry, 

C. G. Waite, 

L. S. Bliss, 



4 50 


1 50 


1 00 


2 -50 


2 00 


7 50 


7 00 



$103 75 



$38 50 



2 


00 


4 


75 


1 


00 


4 00 


2 00 


1 


00 


1 


72 


4 


50 


2 


30 


6 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


9 


00 


5 


00 



$84 77 



West Hatfield District.— M. P. Bradford, Surveyor. 
M. P. Bradford, services and labor, $81 50 



Phillip Carl, 
Peter Stotter, 



21 00 

2 50 



Erastus Strong, 
Adam Doppman, 
Peter Saffer, 
John Batzold, 
P. L. Strong & Sons, 
Wm. Carson, 
N. T. Abells, 
Joseph Stotter, 
Henry Wade, 



labor, 



3 


50 


7 


50 


1 


70 


2 


60 


1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 



$129 30 



North Hatfield District. — 0. Stanley Graves, Surveyor. 

0. S. Graves, services and labor, $29 13 

H. G. Moore, 

Edwin Harris, 

H. H. Field, 

E. F. Cooley, 

John W. Field, 

Leander Cooley, 

Dennis Cooley, 

Luman Crafts, 

E. W. Field, 

Lysander Cooley, 

C. B. Marsh & Son, earth, 

$79 28 



5 00 


4 50 


4 50 


4 00 


2 00 


8 70 


8 75 


2 00 


7 50 


1 20 


2 00 



West Brook District. — Horace Waite, Surveyor, 
Horace Waite & Son, services and labor, $34 44 



Henry R Graves, 
Daniel A. Vining, 
Morris Fitzgibbon, 
Luman Crafts, 



6 75 
10 00 

3 00 
10 00 



Edward C. Waite, 
Dwight Morton, 
Henry E. Graves, 
C. B. Dickinson, 



10 


43 


3 


00 


% 


00 


8 


50 



$93 12 



BEIDGE EXPENSES.— HILL BRIDGE. 

Michael Cleary, stone work, $55 50 

John Kiley, " 55 00 

James Savage, " 20 70 

Nonotuck Silk Co., use of derrick, 37 00 

Horace Shumway, drawing stone, 7 00 

Geo. W. Warner, " " and labor, Inn: 69 70 

Britnal & McDonald, 36 loads of stone, 36 00 

J. A. Sullivan, cement, .62 00 

E. S. Warner, labor and team, 22 62 

M. E. Warner, " " 15 65 

H. S. Porter, " 8 25 

W. M. Jones, " 7 20 

Geo. W. Fitch, " 14 00 

James Porter, " 26 40 

John McGrath, " 13 25 

Chas. E. Kingsley, " 4 00 

Peter Belise, " 3 75 

Geo. S. Booth, " 10 50 

0. E. Hubbard, " 5 00 

Michael Stone, " t 8 75 

S. W. Kingsley, li and ironwork, 19 31 

S. P. Billings, " 10 00 

J. E. Doane, " 1 00 

M. W. Kingsley, " '3 75 

Dexter Jones, " 26 50 

Eobert McGrath, " , 3 50 

J. S. Graves & Son, "* 9 40 

J. D. Porter, " 1 80 



H. S. Hubbard, labor, 

George Benway, " 

K. P. Smith, 

J. T. Fitch, 

Chas. E. Wilkie, lumber and time, 

G. W. Warner, 

E. C. Davis, advice on foundation, 

J. H. Howard, spikes and nails, 

E. A. Burt, boarding Cieary and Savage, 

Mrs. A. Allair, " " " 

B. M. Couch, castings for bridge, 

John Maxwell, lumber, 

M. N. Hubbard, labor, 



OTHER BRIDGE EXPENSES: 

John Maxwell, plank, 

G. W. Warner, " and timber, 

C. B. Dickinson, " " and spikes, 

Theodore Baggs, " 

0. S. Graves, 

Horace Shumway, " 

E. M. Martin, spikes, 

J. H. Howard, 



7 


00 


2 


50 


24 00 


4 


10 


25 


00 


31 


25 


5 


25 


3 


27 


17 


85 


8 


00 


11 


06 


35 


00 


1 


00 



$732 81 



$80 


00 


24 


96 


10 


32 


3 


00 


12 


15 




75 




83 


3 


90 



$135 91 



PAID FOR POOR. 

State Hospital for support of A. M. Richmond, $186 62 

F. F. Abbott, 174 71 

Emily Brenette, 175 59 

Support of Michael Ryan, 29 41 

" Jane Stone, 2 00 

3 



10 



Support of Alice Wheeler's Baby, 

" Pomeroy Doppman's family, 

" Ohaffin family, — and E. R. tickets, 

" James Shea, 

" Charles Manchester's family, 

" James Powers, 

" Mrs. Gertie Murry, 
C. G. Waite, house rent for M. Ryan, 
G. W. Hubbard, " P. Doppman, 
Clothing for Doppman family, 
State Reform School, for Bertie and Penny Wheeler, 

" " " James Stone and Thos. Moran, 

Michael Boyle, care of tramps, 



79 


00 


80 


40 


75 


00 


126 


23 


15 


00 


21 


87 


9 


00 


3 


33 


36 


00 


14 


15 


104 


00 


n, 35 


00 


12 


60 



$1,179 91 



PAID FOR SCHOOLS. 

P. L. Strong & Sons, for wood, 

Henry Cutter, sawing wood, 

Fred. D. Billings, drawing coal, 

Oscar Belden, coal and drawing, 

French & Kimball, coal, 

B. F. Bridges, coal, 

S. S. Dwight, freight on coal, 

A. H. Graves, coal and drawing, 

Miss Emma E. Porter, teaching, Hill, 

" Mary Elmer, 

" Carrie L. Warner, " " 

" Eva Mattoon, 

" Myra E. Parsons, " West Brook, 

" L. H. Clapp, 

" Carrie S. Porter, 

" A. L. Bartlett, " West Farms, 

" Nellie A. Waite, 

" Mary L. Waite, " Center, 

" Anna H. Billings, 

" Carrie L. Warner, 



$25 00 

5 00 

5 00 

9 36 

20 28 

68 70 

13 74 

17 17 

72 00 

72 00 

147 00 

147 00 

138 00 

72 00 

147 00 

72 00 

147 00 

219 00 

147 00 

72 00. 



11 



Miss Anna L. Phillips, teaching, West Hatfield, 

Eddie Burke, Janitor, 

John Kleasnor, " 

Eddie Belden, " 

Lester Swift, " 

George Cooley, " 

Freddie Allair, " 

George Cooley and Steven Kleosner, services as janitors, 

Edward 0. Waite, wood and sawing, 

Geo. W. Fitch, wood, 

Chas. E. Hubbard, boarding teacher, 

F. D. Billings, drawing coal, 



78 


00 


8 


25 


8 


50 


1 


50 


2 


30 


1 


75 


6 


50 


3, 9 


00 


44 


25 


3 


25 


4 


75 


8 


75 



$1,793 05 



REPAIRS AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 

N. T. Abells, repairs, 
H. H. Field, white washing, &c, 
C. H. Jones, windows and repairs, 
J. S. Wells, cash and repairs, 
Wm. Daugherty, repairs, 
Bridgman & Childs, Mdse., 

A. C. Stockin, books, 

B. E. .Cook & Son, two clocks, 
W. H. Day, stove pipe, &c, 
Oscar Belden, crayon, erasers, &c, 



PAID STATE AID. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Coville, 

" Alonzo Dennis, 

" U. B. Graves, 

" Minerva Anderson, 
Peter Carter, 



$27 


41 


3 


50 


5 


00 


12 


.67 


2 


00 


15 


20 


70 


61 


7 


50 


36 


04 


2 


12 



$182 05 



Mrs. U. B. Graves, Town Aid, 



$48 


00 


32 


00 


40 


00 


44 


00 


18 


00 


$182 00 


$35 


00 



12 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



E. F. Billings, librarian, $37 50 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 85 57 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 



Towh Officers. 

W. D. Billings, Assessor, 

" " copying valuation list, 

S. D. Porter, 

" " Assessor, 
G. L. Marsh, 

John E. Doane, Collector, 
A. H. Graves, School Committee, 
Oscar Belden, 
W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, 



$123 07 



$60 00 


20 


00 


13 


75 


65 


00 


60 00 


75 


00 


25 


00 


32 


50 


50 


00 



$401 25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Assessors' Counsel in matter of taxes, $2 00 

S. S. Dwight, freight on plank, 11 00 

Horace Shumway, expressage, 10 35 

E. S. Warner, notifying town officers, 4 00 

L. H. Kingsley, printing, 6 75 

W. D. Billings, Collector's book and stamps, 2 00 

C. H. Wight, trimming hedge in cemetery, t 4 00 

J. S. Holcomb, damage to wagon, 10 00 

W. E. Bardwell, damage to harness and wagon, 5 00 

Expense of running Town lines and Monuments, 13 25 

Luman Crafts, care of water tank, 5 00 



IB 



C. E. Belden, cleaning and repairing engine, 4 00 

A. M. Peck, labor in cemetery, 12 70 

W. D. Billings, recording deaths, births and marriages, 24 60 

R. P. Smith, paper, postage and mail carrying, 5 00 



$119 65 



INTEREST PAID. 

State Treasurer, $3,500, at 4^ per cent, $166 25 

John Pickering & Mosely, $2,U0U, at 4)^ per cent, 45 00 

State Treasurer, $1,000, at 4 per cent, 40 00 

Hampshire Co. hank, $1,000 lor 3 mo., at 4 1-5 per c, 10 50 



BILLS PAYABLE. 



RECAPITULATION. 
Receipts, 1880. 

Cash in hands of Treasurer, March 1, 1880, 

State Treasurer, 

John Pickering & Mosely, 

Corporation Tax, 

Bank Tax, 

State and Military Aid, 

Dog Fund, 

Massachusetts School Fund, 

Mrs. Chaffin's account, 

Rent of Town Hall, 

Old bridge plank, 

E. F. Billings, paid on Note, 

Rufus Swift, School Tuition, 

Assessment of Taxes for 1880, 

Interest on Taxes, from J. E. Doane, 



$261 75 



State Treasurer's Note,— Due, $3,500 00 

John Pickering & Mosely 's Note,— Due, 2,000 00 



$5,500 00 



$1,035 
4,500 
2,000 


25 

00 
00 


168 


00 


1,345 


77 


184 37 


54 


89 


181 


53 


1 


99 


4 


25 


3 


80 


25 


00 


15 


00 


8,563 


43 


45 


31 


$18,128 


59 



u 



Expenditures, 1880. 

State Tax, ■ . . $1,065 00 

County Tax, 1,810 74 

Discount on Taxes, 116 25 

Interest on Notes, 261 75 

State Treasurer's Note, 4,500 00 

John Pickering & Mosely's Note, 2,000 00 

Paid State Treasurer on Town Debt, 1,000 00 

Insurance on Public Buildings, 190 50 

Selectmen's Orders, 5,578 94 

Assessors' Orders of Abatement, 86 04 



$16,609 22 
Cash in hands of Treasurer, 1,519 37 



$18,128 59 



E. P. SMITH, ) Selectmen 

F. K. POETEE, [ of 

C. B. DICKINSON, )' Hatfield. 

EOSWELL BILLINGS, Treasurer. 
Hatfield, March 7, 1881. 

I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen and Treasurer 
and find them right cast and well vouched, and that there re- 
mains in the hands of the Treasurer One Thousand, Five Hun- 
dred and Nineteen Dollars and Thirty Seven cents. ($1,519 37). 

JOSEPH S. WELLS, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 9, 1881. 



15 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 188a. 

Schools, .$1,500 00 

Highways and Bridges, 1,000 00 

Poor, 1,000 00 

Contingent Expenses, 700 00 

Town Officers, 600 00 

Interest, 250 00 

Town Debt, 1,000 00 

Old Bills, 600 00 

Town Aid, 70 00 

Public Library, 200 00 



>,920 00 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 

William Barnes, Henry R. Graves, 

Moses W. Kingsley, Nathaniel T. Abells, 

Henry Wade, John Vollinger, 

Charles E. Hubbard, Henry S. Hubbard, 

Luther Wells, Win. P. Allis, 

Lewis S. Dyer, A. E. Hyde, 

Daniel W. Wells, Eurotas Morton, 

Charles K. Morton, W. H. Dickinson, 

Edwin Brainerd, - Jacob Carl, 

J. H. Howard, James Porter, 

Levi Pease, Arthur F. Curtis, 
Frederick Bardwell. 



16 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 21, 1881. 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary town officers for the coming 
year, including one person for member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the will of the late Oliver 
Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submitted by 
the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen and School Com- 
mittee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7 — To take action in relation to raising money to defray 
the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the town will adopt for the main- 
tainance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the coming year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library, and choose a Committee for the same. 

Art. 12. — To see if the town will by its vote or otherwise ask 
the Legislature to extend to women who are citizens the right 
to hold Town Offices, and to vote in town affairs on the same 
terms as male citizens. 

Art. 13. — To see if the town will refund to Rufus Cowles the 
amount paid by him from over taxation for the years of 1878 
and 1879. 



17 



Art. 14. — To take action in relation to the support of the Poor 
of the town, including the purchase or lease of a farm, and 
making the necessary appropriation. 

Art. 15. — To take action in relation to a decree issued by the 
County Commissioners for the County of Hampshire, on the 
2d day of March, 1880; whereby the New Haven & Northamp- 
ton Co. were authorized and required to make certain altera- 
tions in highways and town ways in the town. 

Art. 16 — To take action in relation to alterations made, and 
obstructions placed in highways and town ways in the town 
by the New Haven & Northampton Co. 

Art. 17. — To take action in relation to alterations made by the 
Connecticut River R. R. at their railroad crossing in the town. 

Art. 18. — To take action under Chapter 54, Section 1, of the 
Acts of 1881; The votes must be by ballots and ballots must 
be "Yes" or "No" in answer to the question — "Shall licenses 
be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in the town?" 

Art. 19. — To take action in relation to procuring a water tank 
near the house of human Crafts. 



18 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



'In presenting our report of the schools of this town for the 
past year, we feel warranted in stating that an average degree of 
prosperity has been attained. 

The number remains the same, seven; the length of time in 
session, thirty-six and one half weeks, except the West Brook 
school, which was shortened one and one half weeks on account 
of sickness of the teacher. Whole number of teachers employed, 
eleven. There was no change in teachers at the commencement 
of the winter term, except in the West Brook school. All have 
manifested an interest in their work, labored faithfully, and 
with good results. 

The Registers show but few names of parents that have visited 
the schools. A teacher said to one of the Committee, "It is 
discouraging; it seems as though the parents cared nothing 
about us." Another says, "I wish the parents would come and 
see for themselves what we are doing, rather than depend on 
hearsay." Such neglect is injustice to the teacher, and great 
injustice to the children. If all that are interested would be- 
come better acquainted with the schools, they could better ap- 
preciate the teachers' labors, and co-operate with them for the 
best interest of the children. 

While we speak of our schools as comparing favorably with 
previous years, we are aware that oar standard is low. We have 
many bright and good scholars that need no urging to go ahead; 
but too large a number are not only dull, but lazy, and are not 
accomplishing what they are capable of doing. How to make 
an improvement in this class should be our study. From them, 
comes most of the absent and tardy marks, mischief and annoy- 
ances that give trouble. The old saying is yet in force: "Satan 
finds some mischief still for idle hands to do." For improve- 



19 



ment in this state of things, we would suggest that every scholar 
be made to do a reasonable amount of work every school-day, 
and no discharge from it without good reasons. By compulsion 
if it can not be done in any other way; at the same time, an ef- 
fort should be made to interest and encourage the scholar to ac- 
tivity, by practical questioning and clear explanations, simpli- 
fied and within reach of the mind taught. 

The present advantages for schooling in our town are such, as 
to afford a good education if rightly used, and within the reach 
of all. Many realize this fact and are making good use of their 
opportunities. Five of our present corps of teachers obtained 
their education wholly in town, and their ability and success in 
teaching gives them much credit. 

We have endeavored to keep the expenses within the amount 
of money appropriated for schools; but was obliged to shorten 
the winter term, for want of money, to thirteen and one-half 
instead of fourteen weeks, the usual length. 

An exchange of Geographies was made in the fall — introduc- 
ing Harper's in place of Warren's — that had been long used in 
our schools. The teachers all speak in praise, of the new book. 
We have also made arrangements to introduce a new spelling- 
book (Swinton's) in even exchange for the old ones. We have 
now in the schools several kinds; some of which have been used 
a long time. The new book appears to be one of merit. 

The wages paid have been the same to all teachers through 
the year; Six dollars per week including board, excepting the 
winter term at West Brook, which was 16.75. 



ROLL OF HONOR 



The following scholars have attended school the entire year 
without an absent or tardy mark: — 

George Barton, Carrie Smith, Harry Abells. 

The latter has been neither absent or tardy for two years. 



20 



No. of children between the ages of 5 and 15, 305 

No. reported last year, 323 

No. of children who have attended school, 301 
Average attendance each term, Spring, 290; Fall, 269; Win., 269 

Average attendance, 222 

No. of children over 15 years of age, 5 

No. of children under 5 years of age, 5 

NAMES OF TEACHEES AND WHERE THEY TAUGHT. 

Hill Distkict. 
Miss Emma E. Porter, Miss Mary Elmer, 

Miss Carrie L. Warner, Miss Eva Mattoon. 

Center District. 
Miss Mary L. Waite, Miss Carrie L. Warner, 
Miss Anna H. Billings, 

West Hatfield District. 
Miss L. H. Clapp, Miss Carrie S. Porter. 

West Brook District. 
Miss Myra E. Parsons, Miss Anna L. Phillips. 

West Farms District. 
Miss Alice L. Bartlett, Miss Nellie A. Waite. 



Amount appropriated for schools, 

" Received from State School Fund, 
" from Dog Fund, 1879, 
" from R, M. Swift, for tuition, 
" Unexpended last year, 



Amount expended for teachers and board, 
" " for wood and coal, 

" " for care of school houses, 

Balance unexpended, 



$1,500 00 

181 53 

45 05 

15 00 

83 25 



$1,824 


83 


$1,537 


75 


220 


50 


37 


80 


28 


78 



$1,824 83 



JOSEPH S. WELLS, 
ALFRED H. GRAVES, 
OSCAR BELDEN, 



School 
Committee. 



REPORTS 



OF 



The iiiiioTMiH, 

ASSESSORS, TREASURER, 



AND 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



OF THK 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending March 1, 1882. 



HATFIELD. MA88. : 

L. H. Kingsley, Job Printee. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the inhabitants of Hatfield : — 

We are able to report the expenses of the year paid with the 
exception of about $100.00 in outstanding accounts — the bills 
for which have not been presented. 

The new plan that was adopted at the last annual meeting for 
repairing highways has, in our opinion, operated succc 
The contractor has, to the best of our knowledge, performed his 
work in a thorough and judicious manner. We have no hesita- 
tion in recommending that the same general plan be pnrsuec 
the coming year. The worst defects in our roads are seen in 
the dry summer months, and cannot be thoroughly remedied 
without hardening, by drawing earth or gravel from a distance; 
this has not been done to a great extent, and could hardly have 
been expected without larger appropriations than have been 
made for the last few years. It may seem advisable for the 
town to make a special appropriation for some particular piece 
of road — as the road through the Hill towards Northampton. 

We have repaired, to some extent, nine bridges, expending 
about $180.00 on the Mill river bridge on the depot road. It 
will be necessary to rebuild two of the bridges on the old depot 
road, and remembering the difficulty we have experienced in 
procuring suitable lumber in the summer we have ordered bills 
of lumber for the two bridges. 

Without something unforseen happening the amount of the 
appropriations of last year need not be largely increased. 

We unexpectedly found the roof of the Town Hall in a 
very bad condition. It seemed ruinous to leave it until another 
season; we therefore, without especial authority from the town, 
have had it slated. We have also repaired the chimn|#s and 
underpinnings. More repairs are necessary, and the building 
needs painting outside. 



PAID OLD BILLS. 

R P. Smith, services as selectman, $100 00 

C. B. Dickinson, " " 50 00 
R K Porter, " " 50 00 
H. S. Gere, advertising, 1 25 
E. M. Martin, groceries P. Doppman, 33 12 

" " " Chas. Manchester, 10 00 

Dr. C. M. Barton, professional services Eichard Wheeler, 14 00 

" Henry Wheeler. 14 00 

" " " " Doppman family, 4 00 

" Michael Ryan, 6 00 

E. M. Martin, Mdse. for schools, 1 85 

D. Powers, labor on highway, 1 60 
R Billings, highway bills, 4 75 

" Mdse. for schools, 2 50 

Bridgman & Childs, books and binding for Library, 67 98 

" " Assessors' schedules, 2 00 

R Billings, Mdse. for schools, 5 28 

Chas. Wells & Co., flour for P. Doppman. 2 50 

Wm. Lyons, meat for " 6 H8 

E. M. Graves, Mdse. for schools. 1 46 
Delano & Hammond. Collector's deed for J. E. Doane, 3 00 
Bond Bros. & Bottum. copies of deeds in ''Draper" case. 8 50 
O. S. Graves, highway bill, 3 65 
L. H. Kingsley, printing town reports, 25 00 
C. K. Morton, labor on highway. 4 00 
Michael Boyle, lodging tramps. 50 

$423 82 



5 



HIGHWAYS. 

K T. Abells, cash, $550 00 



BRIDGES. 

Eurotas Morton, plank, 
James Porter, lumber, 

" labor, 

1ST. T. Abells, repairing Pine bridge, 
H. S. Porter, lumber for spiles and plank, 
T. Graves, 

John E. Doane, sawing plank, 
John McHugh, labor on bridge, (depot road) 
Michael Boyle, " 
J. A. Cutter, 

James Dunn, "'•' " 

H. Shumway, 
C. K. Morton, " 

" drawing plank, 

' ' labor, 

" cash for rope, etc., 

N. T. Abells, labor, with two men, 

" repairs on bridges, 63 30 

" " railings, 5 50 

Geo. C. Smith, lumber, 20 94 

H. W. Olapp, 
Washburn & Banks, iron, 

" spikes, 
Martin Kennedy, blacksmith work, 
Hartley Hale, lumber, 
S. S. Dwight, freight, 
F. S. Reynolds, use of spile driver and work, 

$458 03 



$119 00 


7 


19 


4 


65 


17 


27 


14 


63 


29 


70 


1 


75 


16 


00 


7 


25 


9 


75 


1 


50 


10 


50 


3 


00 


3 


0.0 


9 


50 


1 


71 


55 


60 



3 


60 


2 


22 


3 


30 


2 


00 


24 57 


5 


60 


15 


00 



6 



PAID FOR POOR. 

/ 

Northampton Insane Asylum, 

Board of A. M. Richmond, $184 07 

" Emily Brenette, 176 13 

" F. F. Abbott, 89 32 

" ie and burial expenses, 22 79 

" and burial expenses Sarah G. Morton, 45 29 

Other burial expenses, 4 50 

Vermont Insane Asylum, board of Oliver Bardwell, 50 00 

State Reform School, board of Albert & Penny Wheeler, 104 00 

State Primary School, board of Wm. Stone and T. Moran, 55 00 

Town of Northampton, support of J. Proulx and family, 25 33 

Support of J. Proulx and family, 
" Michael Ryan, 

L. P. Dole, board of James Shea, 

H. S. Porter, board of James Powers, 

Mary Wheeler, board of Alice Wheeler's child, 

Anna Gotz, care of P. Doppman's family, 

C. Doppman, « 

M. N. Hubbard, house rent " " 

Provisions, " ' " 

Support of Jane Stone, 



PAID FOR SCHOOLS. 

Miss Nellie Waite, teaching West Farms District, $216 00 



32 


75 


61 


88 


100 


72 


14 00 


78 


00 


55 


00 


63 


00 


20 


00 


8 


24 


25 


00 


$1215 


02 



Mary L. Waite, 


Center, 


210 00' 


Carrie L. Warner, ' 


Hill, 


210 00 


Eva Mattoon, 


i a 


126 00 


Lilla Peck, 


Center, * 


144 00 


Carrie S. Porter, " 


West Hatfield and Hill, 


210 00 


Anna L. Phillips, i; 


West Brook, 


72 00 


Anna H. Billings, " 


Center, 


66 00 


Mary E. Dodge, " 


West Brook, 


144 00 


Emily Billings. iC 


West Hatfield, 


84 00 



French & Co., coal, 

J. S. Wells, coal, 

A. H. Graves, drawing coal, 

N. T. Abells, 

Oscar Belden, coal, $ 

P. L. Strong & Sons, wood, 

Geo. W. Warner, wood, 

E. C. Wait, wood, and sawing same, 

Eurotas Morton, wood, 

Geo. F. Cutter, sawing wood, 

John O'Neil 

J. E. Doane, wood, 

Frank Cutter, janitor, 

Nicholas Burke, janitor, 

H. G. Moore, cash paid for janitors, 

Eddie Burke, janitor, 

H. G. Moore, cash paid for janitors, 

Eddie Burke, janitor, 

Fred Allair, janitor, 

Frank Cutter, janitor, 



39 


51 


45 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 


20 


31 


19 


50 


8 


00 


21 


75 


10 


00 


5 


00 


2 


50 


10 


50 


2 


00 


4 50 


4 


55 


3 


75 


7 


25 


10 


50 


10 


50 


7 


00 


$1718 


62 



REPAIRING SCHOOL HOUSES. 



Michael Clancy, mason work at Center, 

John Kiley, 

N. T. Abells, building fence and repairs on school house, 

West Hatfield, 
Mrs. Burke, cleaning Center school house, 
H. S. Hubbard, lumber for Hill school house "annex," 
A. H. Graves, 

L. P. & B. P. Dole, carpenter work on " " 

J. E. Porter, bill of A. W. Breck's, painting, 
A. W. Breck, painting, 

" paint, 

Dewey & Loomis, bill of A. W. Breck's, 



p 


00 


6 


00 


30 


90 


10 


00 


26 


41 


6 


85 


30 


25 


85 


00 


22 


37 


7 


36 


21 


94 



8 



J. S. Wells, cash paid for pumps, 
S. W. Kingsley, pumps and repairs, 
Geo. H. Hannum, repairing chimneys at Center, 
Joseph Champagn, repairing slate roof, " 

I 

PAID STATE AID. 
Mrs. U. B. Graves, 

Elzabeth Coville, 

Ruth Dennis, 

Minerva Anderson, 
Peter Carter, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 

E. F. Billings, services as Librarian, 

" catalogueing books, 

C. G. Waite, wood, 
Philos Doane, sawing wood, 
David J. Field, one book, 

L. H. Kingsley, printing catalogues and labels, 
Bridgman & Childs, books, 
R. M. Woods, books, 
E. F. Billings, services as Librarian, 



SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS. 
J. S. Wells, Assessor, 
H. S. Hubbard, " 
E. C. Waite, 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, 
J. S. Wells, School Committee, 
A. H. Graves, 
H. G. Moore, 

L. H. Kingsley, Tax Collector, 
Wm. C. Dickinson, Treasurer. 



15 


10 


9 


45 


7 


50 


13 


24 


$401 


37 


$48 


00 


48 


00 


68 


00 


48 


00 


18 


00 


$230 00 


$48 


75 


12 


50 


5 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


1 


50 


4 50 


26 


85 


1 


20 


12 


50 


$118 80 


$47 


50 


43 


75 


43 


75 


50 


00 


35 


00 


30 


00 


32 


00 


150 


00 


50 


00 



$482 00 



9 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 
School House Supplies and Eepairs. 
J. S. Wells, cash paid for school books, 
J. H. Howard, Mdse., 
W. F. Prindle, stove pipe, 
A. H. Graves, cash paid for repairs, 
Eames & Sprague, stoves and repairs, 
A. H. Graves, supplies, 

H. G. Moore, cash paid for repairs and supplies, 
N. T. Abells, repairs, West Hatfield, 
W. L. Smith, furniture, 
E. M. Martin, Mdse., 
Mrs. Dunn, cleaning Hill school house, 
Mrs. Burke, " Center 
Ginn, Heath & Co., globe, 
Geo. E. Coats, stove and pipe, West Brook, 
H. G. Moore, cash paid for repairs, 
Joseph Champagn, repairing slate roof, West Brook, 
M. H. Burke, painting and repairs, 
H. G. Moore, cash paid for cleaning, 



Expenses of Committee on R. E. Crossings. 
S. G. Hubbard, surveying and services as witness, 
Edmund Powers, services as witness, 
W. D. Billings, 
Bond Bros. & Bottum, legal services, 



Repairs on Town Hall. 
Bartlett Bros., slating, 
Albert W. Morton, drawing slate, 
C. K. Morton, 

" labor, and cash paid for repairs, 

Michael Clancy, stone work, 
John Kiley, 

W. M. Pomeroy, repairing sash and blinds. 
I. R. Clarke, « 

Jerry Brown, repairing chimneys, 



$24 25 


4 


56 


1 


23 


8 


25 


56 


58 


1 


50 


10 


31 


6 


15 


19 


15 


1 


51 


5 


00 


■ 7 


50 


4 


00 


15 


50 


2 


50 


i 


97 


15 


45 


2 


00 


$193 


41 


s. 

$14 00 


3 


50 


3 


10 


37 


50 


$58 


10 


$188 


61 


3 


50 


1 


25 


2 


50 


3 


00 


2 


50 


6 


72 


5 


00 


11 


00 



$224 08 



10 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

C. H. Pierce, insurance, 

Oliver Walker, 

C. K. Morton, cash paid Delano & Hammond for legal 

advice on claims of Rufus Cowles, 
C. K. Morton, cash paid for postage, 
Bridgman & Childs, blank books and stationery, 
H. Shumway, express on books, 
Metcalf & Co., Assessor's blanks, 
L. H. Kingsley, printing, 
J. S. Wells, stationery, 

W. D. Billings, recording births, marriages and deaths, 
A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 

" trimming hedge, and work in cemetery, 
J. H. Howard, oil and lamp chimneys, Town Hall, 
S. W. Kingsley, repairing road scraper, 
N. T. Abells, painting " 

" cash paid for earth, 

L. S. Crafts, water tank and care of same, 
W'm. Daugherty, painting guide boards, 
C. K. Morton, expenses to Monson, 

" ii Chicopee, 

" paid for team, 

L. H. Kingsley, tax on town land, 
Wm. C. Dickinson, stationery and postage, 
E. F. Billings, services as Constable, 



137 50 


56 


00 


2 


00 


2 


75 


19 


30 


3 


25 


6 


50 


6 


00 




90 


, 22 


60 


5 


75 


16 


62 


2 


72 


7 


30 


1 


50 


5 


40 


20 


00 


1 


50 


3 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


2 


13 


2 


00 


7 


00 



$236 72 



Respectfully submitted, 



CHAS. K. MORTON, 
JAMES PORTER, 
EUROTAS MORTON, 



Selectmen 

of 

Hatfield. 



Hatfield, Mass.. March 8, 1882. 



11 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Wm. C. DICKINSON, Tbeasubee, 

In account with TOWN OF HATFIELD. 

DR. 
To cash rec'd from E, Billings, Treas., $1,519 37 



ii 


ii 


Corporation Tax, 


$ 200 13 


ii 


ii 


National Bank Tax, 


1,388 42 


ii 


ii 


Relief of Indigent Soldiers 








and Sailors, 


203 00 


ii 


ii 


Dog Fund, 


34 25 


ii 


ii 


School Fund, 


181 02 


ii 


ii 


Burial Lots, 


4 00 


ii 


ii 


E. F. Billing's Note, 


17 50 


ii 


ii 


L. H. Kingsley, Coll., 


7,937 46 



$9,965 78 



Cash received from Loans, 

State Treasurer, 4 per cent. $2,500 00 

4 1-4 " 2,000 00 
Cash received from temporary Loans. 

State Treasurer, 3 1-2 per cent. 2,000 00 

3 1-2 " 1,000 00 
Hampshire Savings Bank, 4 1-2 pr ct. 2,000 00 

4 1-2 1,000 00 

5 700 00 
5 500 00 



$11,700 00 



$23,185 15 



12 



CH. 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 1880, 

1881, 

Cash paid State Tax, 
County Tax, 
" Interest on Notes, 



Cash paid on Loans, 
State Treasurer, 



Hampshire Savings Bank, 

it K (( 

a a a 

a a a 

John Pickering & Mosely, 
Balance in Treasury, 



$ 772 88 




6309 97 


$7,082 85 




$1,065 00 

1,810 74 

320 02 


$3,195 76 




$2,500 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
700 00 




500 00 




2,000 00 

4 


il 9 I7AA AA 


206 54 


$23,185 15 



In account with L. H. Kingsley, Collector. 

DR. 
To cash received, $7,937 46 



Orders of abatement, 60 07 

Discount on taxes, 133 55 



U31 08 



CR. 

By Assessor's warrant, $8,105 20 

Interest on taxes, 25 88 

$8,131 08 



13 



SUMMARY. 



State Treasurer's Note, due April 9, 1882, 
" due June 1, 1882, 



In hands of Treasurer, 

Due on E. E. Billing's Note, 

Due from D. W. Wells, Adm'r estate of 

Sarah Gr. Morton, 
Due from State and Military Aid, 



Indebtedness of the town, $4,022 26 

Wm. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 

I have this day examined the books and vouchers of the 
Selectmen and Treasurer and found them correct. 

D. W. WELLS, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass.. March 8, 1882. 





$2,500 00 
2,000 00 




$4500 00 


$206 54 
15 91 




45 29 
210 00 


$477 74 





14 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



In accordance with the vote of the town, your Assessors pre- 
sent the following report of their doings for the year 1881. 

By vote of the town, and warrants issued by the Treasurer of 

the State and the Clerk of the County, we were instructed to 

assess upon the polls and estates of the town the following sums 

less the Corporation and Bank Tax. — Estimated to be $1,600. 

Town Grant, $6,585 00 

State Tax, 1,065 00 

County Tax, 1,810 74 

Overlayings, 244 46 



9,705 20 
Less Corpora'n and Bank Tax, 1,600 00 



$8,105 20 

We find the value of real estate to be $757,542.00; value of 
personal estate, $279,204.16. Total valuation, May 1,1881, 
$1,036,746.16. 

Number of polls, 373; No. of acres of land, 9,114; No. of 
dwelling houses, 298; No. of horses, 338; No. of cows, 668. 

Money at interest, $61,993; Money on hand, $1,767; Public 
Stocks, $8000; Stocks in Corporations out of State, $23,250; 
Eate of tax per $1000, $7.10. 

No. of children between 5 and 15 years of age, 329. 

The tax as assessed was placed in the hands of L. H. Kingsley, 
Collector, with a warrant to collect the same, and pay it to the 
Treasurer of the town. A warrant was also issued by us to Wm. 
C. Dickinson, Treasurer, instructing him to collect from L. H. 
Kingsley, Collector, the sum of $8,105.20. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. S. WELLS, i Assessors 

H. S. HUBBARD. [ of 
E. C. WAIT. \ Hatfield. 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1881. 



» Highways and Bridges, 
Poor, 
Schools, 

» Repairing School Houses, 
Contingent Expenses, 
Town Officers, 
Interest, 
Town Debt, 
Public Library, 



$1,000 


00 


1,200 


00 


1,500 


00 


400 


00 


500 


00 


600 


00 


220 


00 


1000 


00 


150 


00 



$6,570 00 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 



Moses W. Kings-ley, 
Lewis S. Dyer, 
Daniel W. Wells, 
Chas. K. Morton, 
Edwin Brainerd, 
J. H. Howard, 
Levi L. Pease, 
Eu rotas Morton, 
Jacob Carl, 
James Porter, 
F. H. Bardwell, 

Henry S. 



Charles E. Hubbard, 
Oscar Belden, 
Wm. H. Belden, 
Daniel A. Vining, 
Champion B. Dickinson, 
Amariah E. Strong, 
Alpheus Cowles, 
Elisha Hubbard, 

E. Seward Warner, 
Dwight P. Morton, 

F. D. Billings, 
Porter. 



16 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 20, 1882. 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary town officers for the coming 
year, including one person for member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the will of the late Oliver 
Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submitted by 
the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Assessors, Treas- 
urer and School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to defray 
the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the town will adopt for the main- 
tainance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the coming year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the town will make an appropriation for the 
Public Library and choose a Committee for the same. 

Art. 12. — To see if the town will by its vote or otherwise, ask 
the Legislature to extend to women who are citizens, the right 
to hold town offices, and to vote in town affairs on the same 
terms as male citizens. 

Art. 13. — To take action in relation to the support of the poor 
of the town, including the purchase or lease of a farm, and 
making the necessary appropriation for the same. 



17 



Art. 14. — To take action in relation to the railroad crossings in 
the town. 

Art. 15. — To see if the town will build gates at the cemetery at 
West Farms, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Art. 16.— To take action under Chapter 54, Section *L, of the 
Acts of 1881. The votes must be by ballots and ballots must 
be "Yes" or "No" in answer to the question — "Shall licenses 
be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in the town." 

Art. 17. — To see if the town-will take action in relation to 
adopting "By-Laws." 

Art. 18. — To see if the town will grant to Samuel D. Partridge 
lot No. 34, in the cemetery near the church; he having paid 
the Treasurer of the town the sum raised by vote of the town, 
June 7, 1847, and take action in relation to the cemetaries of 
the town and make appropriations for the same. 

Art. 19. — To see if the town will allow Mary D. Porter to build 
platform scales upon the triangular piece of land between the 
highways opposite C. S. Shattuck's factory. 



18 



REPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE. 



Each year of service to the town as Library Committee, 
strengthens our convictions that a free public library is a real 
public good. It is a means of education; and experience has 
shown that no money is more wisely expended than money spent 
for education. In a time too, when there is so much cheap lit- 
erature abroad, corrupt and demoralizing in its influence, we are 
grateful that in our community the young have reading placed 
within their reach, which is instructive to the mind and healthy 
to the moral nature. 

Our library does not afford all the advantages of larger insti- 
tutions. We believe, however, that few make better returns than 
ours for the amount appropriated for their support. 

The running expenses are comparatively very small. The per 

cent, of the appropriations spent in buying new books is large. 

The free circulation of the books is hampered by no annoying 
rules, often necessary in larger places. 

Very few books have been lost since the library was founded. 
The books are used. Many of them show the, effects of usage. 
This last fact leads your Committee to make two recommenda- 
tions: — 

1st. — That more care be taken of the books on the part of read- 
ers. All citizens are interested in the careful treatment of 
public property. 

2nd. — That as before, the town make an extra appropriation to 
rebind old books, and make them once more serviceable. 
We append a list of the books purchased the past year. 



19 



A Wife's Tragedy, 

Friends, 

Rosecroft, 

The True Nobility, 

A Changed Heart, 

Happy- Go-Lucky, 

Lenox Dare, 

A Fearful Responsibility, 



Dr. Breen's Practice, 
Faith and Unfaith, 
The Two Cabin Boys, 
Cyclopaedia of Commercial An- 
ecdotes, 2 vols. 
Homoselle, 
Rose Mary and Rue, 
The Forger and Detective, 



Anecdotes of Public Men, 2 vols. John Eax, 



Aunt Serena, 

Without a Home, 

Cape Cod Folks, 

That Beautiful Wretch, 

Sunrise, 

The Letter of Credit^ 

Madeline, 

Caesar, 

The Eastern Archipelago, 



History of Our Own Times, 2 vol 
The Prince and the Pauper, 
Wit and Humor, 
Capture of a Locomotive, A his- 
tory of the secret service. 
Land of the Midnight Sun, 2vol 
Hawthorne's Works, 12 vols* 
Dryden's Poems, 2 vols. 
Froude's Reminiscenses, 



Young Folks' History of Russia, Outline Study of Man, 

The Fairport Nine, Conflict of Christianity with 

In the Brush, Heathenism, 

Young Folks' History of Boston, Count of Monte Christo, 

" '■ Greece, Chas. O'Malley, — . .> 

From Log Cabin to White HouseHandy Andy, 
The Pocket Rifle, Harper's Magazine, 1881, 2 vols 

True Blue, Scribner's "' " " 

The Floating Light, Atlantic 

A College Widow, Life of Garfield. 



20 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The School Committee in presenting their annual report to 
the citizens of Hatfield, are pleased to be able to report a good 
degree of progress in most of the schools. 

We have endeavored to secure competent teachers. All have 
been faithful in the discharge of their duties, and a majority 
have been successful; although they have been obliged to meet 
the discouragements of a very irregular attendance, which is the 
great hindrance to the progress and usefulness of our schools. 
There is no remedy but for the parents to unite cordially and 
heartily with the teachers in correcting this evil. The scholar 
who stays away from school, either with or without the consent 
of his parents or guardian, not only makes an irretrievably loss 
individually, but retards the whole school. Parents should es- 
teem the matter of an education of so much importance, that 
they will make great sacrifices if necessary, in order that their 
children may secure the full benefit of the free school _system. 

Your Gommitte has endeavored, to have pains taken in re- 
gard to instruction in morals and manners, realizing that the 
../:.;: ^ of to-day are the citizens of to-morrow. There is a 
Statute law concerning moral instruction which we quote. 

"It shall be the duty of all preceptors and teachers of acade- 
mies, and of all otherinstructors of youth, to exert their best 
endeavors to impress on the minds of children and youths com- 
mitted to their care and instruction, the principles of piety and 
justice, and a sacred regard to truths; love of their country; hu- 
manity and universal benevolence; sobriety, industry and frugal- 
ity; chastity, moderation and temperance; and those virtues 
which are the ornaments of human society, and the basis upon 
which a republican constitution is founded; and it shall be the 
duty of such instructors to endeavor to lead their pupils, as their 
ages and capacities will admit, into a clear understanding of the 
tendency of the above mentioned virtues, and to point out to 



31 



them the evil tendency of the opposite vices." 

The arrangements made and reported last year, for the ex- 
change of spelling books, has been successfully carried out, and 
greatly to the advantage of the schools. 

What can be done to improve our schools? Is, and should be 
the question asked by all interested in the intelligent education 
of our children. In our opinion, a Superintendent of schools 
would do more towards perfecting our school system than any- 
thing yet suggested. There is an objection in regard to cost. 
But would it not be true economy to raise a few dollars extra or 
shorten the school year somewhat, in order that our schools 
might be thoroughly and properly managed in every case? 

.The appropriation of $400 raised for extra repairs, we have 
expended in painting the school buildings at the Center and 
Hill; kalsomihg the school rooms at the Center, Hill, and at 
West Hatfield; relaying the brick floor in the basement at the 
Center; removing all nuisances from the basement of the Hill 
school house, and constructing proper buildings at some dis- 
tance from the school house, and by building a fence around the 
play-grounds at West Hatfield. Expending in all, $401.37. For 
items, we refer you to the Selectmen's report. 



ROLL OF HONOR, 

The following scholars have attended school the entire year 
without being absent or tardy: — 

Hattie Kingsley, Grace Marsh, Henry Carl, 

Lida Kingsley, Adeline Remmillard, Delia Remmillard, 

Harry Howard, Fred Howard. 

No. of children between the ages of 5 and 15, 329 

No. reported last year, . 305 

No. of scholars enrolled, 286 

Average attendance, 177% 

Scholars over 15 years of age, 9 

LTnder 5 years of age, 



22 



STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EMPLOYED, 
AND NUMBER OF SCHOLARS. 

Hill District. — Grammar. 
Miss Eva V. Mattoon, 2 terms. Miss Carrie S. Porter, 1 term. 



No. of scholars enrolled, 




33 


Average membership, 
" attendance, 
Scholars over 15, 




2? 

23^ 

2 


Number weeks of school, 




" 35 


Hill District. - 


-Primary. 




Miss Carrie L. 


Warner. 




No. of scholars enrolled, 




.75 


Average membership, 
" attendance, 


« 


53>4 

45^ 


No. weeks of school, 




35 


Center District. 


— Grammar. 




Miss Mary L. 
No. of scholars enrolled, 


Waite. 


28 


Average membership, 
" attendance, 




24 

• is y 2 


Scholars over 15 years of age, 
No. weeks of school, 




i 

35 



Center District. — Primary. 
Miss Anna H. Billings, 1 term. Miss Lilla H. Peck, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 36 

Average membership, 30 

" attendance, 26 

No. weeks of school, 35 

West Farms District. 
Miss Nellie A. Waite. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 32 

Average membership, 24 

" attendance, 21 

Scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

No. weeks of school, 36 



23 



West Brook District. 
Miss A. L. Phillips, 1 term. Miss Mary E. Dodge, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 35 

Average attendance, 17 

Scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

No. weeks of school, 36 

West Hatfield District. 
Miss Carrie S. Porter, 2 terms. Miss Emily G. Billings, 1 term. 
Number of scholars enrolled, 47 

Average attendance, 27 

Scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

Number weeks of school, 35 

The wages paid teachers was uniform throughout the town; 
it being six dollars, including board. 

APPROPRIATIONS AND EECEIPTS. 

Balance unexpended last year, $ 28 78 

Appropriated by the town, 1,500 00 

Received from Mass. State School Fund, 181 02 

" Dog Fund, 34 25 





$1,744 05 


Amount expended for teachers and board, 


$1,482 00 


" " wood and coal, 


186 57 


" " care school houses, 


50 05 


Balance unexpended, 


25 43 



$1,744 05 



J. S. WELLS, ) Q , . , 

A. H. GRAVES, I n bcho ?} 

H. G. MOORE. ) Committee. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



Selectmen, Treasurer, Collector, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



A N I) 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE, 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield, 



For the Year Ending March 1st, 1883, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. : 
STEAM PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY. 

1883. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield : 

We have been unable to limit the expenditures to quite the 
amounts named in all the appropriations, owing to causes that 
were not anticipated at the beginning of the year. 

The greatest excess is in the support of poor. We received 
notice from the town of Dalton in the case of Joseph Bolack's 
family. Deserted by him, they had been supported by that 
town for more than a year. We only acknowledged the settlement 
after thorough investigation of the records of the towns where 
the family had formerly lived, and by the advice of legal counsel. 
The woman has since died and her family have secured places 
for the three children. Mitchel Graves whom we have support- 
ed for the last year (a new case), has died, also, Emily Brenette 
an insane pauper. 

We thought that Doppman's family would require but little 
assistance the present year, but in the fall six of the family were 
sick with typhoid fever. The two girls died, the elder had 
been of considerable assistance in the care of the house, the 
mother being bed-ridden. 

We are now expending at the rate of less than one thousand 
dollars a year for poor. 

The ferry was thrown upon the two towns, Hatfield and 
Hadley at the beginning of the season. We have newly equip- 
ed the ferry and now have opportunities to sell the boats and 
wire for nearly their cost. The towns will probably be at no 
further expense. The change of location of the ferry road, and 
other causes will make the ferry self-supporting. 

(3) 



Iii the matter of permanent repairs of highways, we put upon 
the Northampton road more than fifteen hundred loads of grav- 
el and hard pan, at a cost of $557.00. We found that it was 
useless to spread the earth any less than six or eight inches in 
depth, and that the road could be completed at that time cheap- 
er than to take it up again. We bought an acre of land for 
$100.00, of the New Haven and Northampton Co. We have not 
accepted the deed and paid for the land on account of the delav 
of the company in putting up line stones. They will do so very 
soon. 

We unexpectedly found Pine Bridge in a dangerous condition, 
too far gone for repairs. We have built a substantial bridge at 
a reasonable price, considering the difficulty of finding and pro- 
curing suitable lumber at that season of the year. 

It will probably be necessary to rebuild the north abutment of 
Mill bridge, as it is gradually working over at the top. One sec- 
tion of the bridge will have to be built new, and the whole bridge 
seems to be decayed. Mr. E. 0. Davis has made estimates for 
iron bridges, also for the stone work. He estimates the stone 
work at $792.00. One kind of bridge, the kind most in use in 
this vicinity, "The Truss," $1,682.92, complete. The other 
kind a "plate girder," similar to those on the New Haven & North- 
ampton railroad crossings, $2,119.45. We estimate the cost of 
a wooden bridge similar to the present one, $600.00. 

Through the kind instrumentality of Hon. A. Norcross, M. C. 
Congress has by special Act, donated to the town of Hatfield, 
four howitzers for "monumental purposes." 

It seems to us that by their use, a soldiers' monument can be 
built at a comparatively small expense, thus appropriately com- 
memorating the names of the Soldiers and Sailors of this town 
who died in the War of the Rebellion. In accordance with our 
duty, and a strong vote of instruction by the voters of this town, 
we have entered complaints and secured the conviction of five 
persons for the illegal sale of intoxicating liquors. We have 
been at no expense for detectives or evidence. We have paid 
our Counsel $42.00, which sum taken from the $75.00, recieved 
for the one license, issued by us (since surrendered) leaves a 
balance of $33.00, on this account. 

Our exenditures are as follows : 



OLD BILLS. 

A. Allair, drawing slate, $1 50 

M. N. Hubbard, house rent P. Doppman, 16 66 

E. S. Warner, notifying town officers, 3 50 

Chas. K. Morton, services as Selectman, 100 00 

James Porter, " " 50 00 

Eurotas Morton, " " 58 00 

L. P. Dole, board James Shea, 55 72 

Moses Warner, posts, 2 88 
Vermont Insane Asylum, board and burial 

expenses Oliver Bardwell, 99 00 

Dr. C. M. Barton, med. attendance poor, 32 06 

L. H. Kingsley, printing town reports, 28 00 

H. S. Gere, advertising, 1 00 

Wm. Lyons, butcher's bill M. Ryan, 6 62 

City of Holyoke, support of Jane Stone, 4 00 

T. Baggs, lodging tramps, 1 -50 
Eorotas Morton, cash paid for snowing road, 

West Brook, 18 25 

N. T. Abels, snowing road West Brook, 1 00 
Bridgman and Ohilds, books for pub. library, 30 92 



PAID FOE SCHOOLS. 



$510 61 



Martha D. Gardner, teaching, 
Carrie Warner, " 

Carrie Porter, " 

Emily G. Billings, 
Nellie A. Waite, 
Myra C. Parsons, " 

Eunice J. Morton, " 
Maggie E. Robbins, " 
Eleanor H. Kirk, 
Mary L. Waite, 
French & Co., coal, 
Mrs. L. W. Clark, coal, 
H. G. Moore, cash for coal, 
Dr. C. M. Barton, 



$210 00 

210 00 

210 00 

210 00 

126 00 

126 00 

144 00 

84 00 

84 00 

66 00 

21 58 

71 38 

32 07 

41 51 



A. W. Morton drawing coal, 


$3 25 


M. P. Bradford, wood, 


10 


60 


Eurotas Morton, " 


20 


00 


JohnE. Doane, " 


3 


13 


Chas. E. Hubbard, " 


3 


50 


Philos Doane, sawing wood, 


3 


33 


Frank Cutler, " " 


2 


00 


A. H. Graves, cash for sawing wood, 


1 


50 


H. G. Moore, " " " 


6 


50 


" " " " janitors, 


22 


80 


Willie Hubbard, janitor, 


7 


00 


John Burke Jr. , ' ' 


5 


25 


Francis Kemillard, " 


6 


75 


Joseph Marsh, maps and books, 


19 


02 


H. G. Moore, cash paid to janitor, 


5 


00 






$1,756 17 



PAID FOR POOR. 



J. H. Howard, goods and gro. for M. Ryan, $71 00 

A. M. Peck, milk " " 11 76 

Wm. Lyons, butcher's bill, " " 11 69 

H. Shumway, drawing wood, 1 50 
Mrs. Mary McAlpine, board, services as nurse 

and burial ex. Joseph Bolack's wife, 78 00 

Town of Dalton, sup. " " family, 240 14 

A. M. Peck, serv. as sexton, 0. Bardwell, 4 50 

Mary Wheeler, board Alice Wheeler's child, 72 00 

Town of Granby, support of J. Proulx family, 71 35 

:T " " il " Jos. Martin's children, 9 70 

Anna Gotz, care of P. Doppman's family, 20 00 

Chas. T. Parsons, for procuring woman, 10 00 

Chas. K. Morton, cash paid " 7 00 

Anna Doppman, washing, 9 00 

" care, 52 50 

Mrs. John Smith, care, 2 25 

Joseph Smith, drawing coal, 2 50 

Mary Wheeler, washing, 4 50 

J. H. Howard, groceries, 45 66 



Kimball & Gary, coal, $14 20 

Henry Hartung, cash for team, etc., 2 25 

Wm. Lyons, butcher's bill, 15 35 

M. N. Hubbard, house rent, 22 78 

Clark & Parsons, truss, 4 00 

J. H. Howard, groceries, 6 '22 

P. Doppman, for support cash, 50 00 

Mary Beaugard, board of M. Graves and family, 152 54 

Cutler, Plympton & Co., groceries, 12 60 

L. P. Dole, board James Shea, 156 42 
Northampton Lunatic Hospital, board of 

Allen M. Kichmond, 186 77 

Board of Emily Brenette, 180 27 

Patrick Kussell, support, 55 83 

A. M. Peck, services as sexton, 5 00 
State Kef or m School, board of Albert and 

Penny Wheeler, 47 57 



HIGHWAYS. 

N. T. Abells, labor, $550 00 

EXTRA EXPENSES. 

Peter Balize, digging ditch, 1 50 

Michael Boyle, " " and drawing stone, 10 75 

Michael O'Dea, tl " " " 8 25 

Horace Waite, building fence, 5 78 

N. T. Abells, labor new ferry road, 7 50 

• - " cash paid for earth, 5 55 



$1,651 85 



$39 33 



NORTHAMPTON" ROAD — PERMANENT REPAIRS. 

Hosea Wheeler, for labor, $2 62 

Wm. Boyle, " " 10 50 



Frank Newman, for labor, 




$10 50 


John Chandler, " * 


■,( 




10 50 


John Kiley & Son, 


a 




17 63 


Robert McGrath, 


a 




10 50 


Lewis Murray, Jr., 


a 




10 50 


Thomas Buckley, 


a 




10 50 


Joseph Schepp, 


a 




10 50 


Walter Langdon, 


" with team, 


28 00 


N. Powers, and Thos. 


, Nolan labor with team. 


28 75 


Michael 0'Dea& Son, 


, labor, 




21 00 


Daniel Doolan, • 


a 




4 50 


John Burke, 


a 




9 00 


Joseph Gowash, labor, 




6 00 


John McGrath, " 






1 50 


John O'Neil, 






6 00 


John B. Ryan, " 


with team, 


20 12 


Edward Sheehan, " 






9 00 


Chas. E. Kingsley, " 






6 00 


Peter Saffa, 


ec 


Si 


24 38 


John Holdfedder, " 






4 50 


John T. Fitch , labor with team. 


22 50 


H. S. Porter, 


a 


a 


40 75 


J. D. Porter, 


tt 


a 


3 50 


James Porter, " 


t< 


(6 


3 50 


Chas. K. Morton, il 


a 


a 


10 50 


H. g. Hubbard, " 


a 


a 


20 13 


Elisha Hubbard, " 


t( 


a 


23 63 


Jacob Carl, " 


i( 


a 


21 00 


Frederick Carl, " 


ft 


a 


17 50 


M. E. Warner, " 


a 


.( 


35 50 


E. S. Warner, 


a 


a 


6 13 


Lewis Raboin, " 


a 


a 


7 00 


Wm. M. Jones, ic 


a 


ft 


14 00 


Horace Shu m way, 


a 


ft 


42 00 


John McHngh, " 


a 


» 


14 25 


M. LaMountain, il 






3 00 


M. P. Bradford, " 


a 


a 


10 50 



$557 89 





STATE AID. 




Mrs. Coville, 




$48 00 


Peter Cartier, 




18 00 


Mrs. Graves, 




48 00 


Mrs. Anderson, 




44 00 


Mrs. Dennis, 




36 00 



$194 00 



BRIDGES. 




J. H. Howard, spikes, 




$ 90 


P. Doppman, labor, 




6 00 


N. T. A bells, railings, 




5 50 


John Steele, labor, 




5 25 


Frank Saffa, " 




7 50 


John Batzold, " 




7 50 


James Ormah, " 




6 00 


Geo. Vollenger, labor, 




6 75 


James Mullins, " 




8 00 


Robert McGrath, " 




6 00 


Daniel Garvey, " 




6 00 


Peter Saffa, 




21 ,25 


Frank I. Washburn, nails and spikes, 


10 23 


N. T. Abells, labor, 




43 50 


Henry D wight, " 




75 


H. G. Moore, lumber, 




68 14 


0. W. White, labor, 




6 75 


Ohas. K. Morton, lumber and nails, 


2 00 


Dexter Jones, labor, 




6 00 


John Kiley, 




2 40 


Eurotas Morton, plank and 


posts, 


112 42 


N. T. Abells, 




23 50 


" 6i drawing " 




7 00 


," " plank and labor, 




16 00 


H. W. Olapp, lumber, 




2 56 


Day Bros., '"' 




3 20 



$391 10 



10 
PINE BRIDGE. 

Levi W. Smith, labor and materials, $14 70 

Geo. Saffa, 

John Steele, 

Frank Saffa, 

John Batzold, " 

Peter Balize, 

P. Doppman, il 

Geo. Vollenger, " 

John O'Neil, 

C. R. R. R. Co., freight on lumber, 

Theodore Childs, lumber, 

James Mollins, labor, 

John B. Ryan, " 

Peter Saffa, 

N. T. Abells, " 

John McHugh, 

George Bitner, 

Wm. H. & Wm. 0. Dickinson, lumber, 



8 


25 


9 


75 


8 


25 


1 


50 


7 


50 


5 


00 


9 


75 


4 50 


7 


00 


64 


88 


9 


00 


4 50 


3 


50 


58 


00 


7 


50 


1 


00 


64 


68 



$289 26 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

Mrs. Dunn, cleaning, 

J. H. Howard, mds., 

H. A. Wright, shingles, 

H. G. Moore, cash paid for sup. and repairs, 

J. H. Howard, brooms, 

M. H. Burke, painting, 

A. H. Graves, cash paid for grading, 

C. W. White, repairs, 

Eames & Sprague, repairing stoves, 

J. A. Cutter, shingling, 

Dexter Jones, labor and repairs, 

L. S. Crafts, repairs, 

N. T. Abells, cash, labor and repairs, 



$2 


10 


1 


32 


20 


63 


, 14 


50 


1 


00 


191 


79 


20 


25 


7 


50 


12 


14 


9 


50 


5 


25 


7 


59 


6 


97 



$300 54 



$65 


48 


13 


50 


115 


38 


25 


00 


1 


25 


2 


19 


1 


00 


1 


50 



$17 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


50 


00 


2 


00 


$42 00 


9 


00 


164 40 


40 


00 


$255 


40 


36 


60 



$225 30 



11 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bridgman & Childs, books, 
Springfield Printing Co.,. " 

" is " repairing books, 

E. F. Billings, salary as librarian, 
Roswell Billings, cuspidor, 
J. H. Howard, oil, 
L. H. Kingsley, printing, 
D. W. Wells, cash paid for cleaning room, 



SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS. 

E. F. Billings, Constable, 

H. S. Hubbard, Assessor, 

H. G. Moore, 

J. S. Wells, 

H. G. Moore, School Committee, 

Wm. D. Billings, Town Clerk, 

Thomas J. Ryan, Constable, 

FERRY ACCOUNT. 

Geo. W. Prentiss, wire, 

Peter C artier, boat, 

G. M. Smith, one half cost of boat, 

L. S. Bliss, use of old boat, 



Recieved from Town of Hadley for over pay, 

One-half total expense, $218 80 

REPAIRS OF TOWN HALL. 

J. T. Hannum, plastering, $4 20 

Geo. H. Walker, paints and oils, 50 75 

Mrs. John Burke, cleaning, 5 25 

Mrs. Michael O'Dea, " 5 25 

M. H. Burke, furnishing and repairing blinds, 

paint, glass and labor, 107 68 

$173 13 



$244 00 



12 



MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT. 

Joseph Schepp, earth to fill hole on land of 

Anthony Gilbert, $2 50 

N. T. Abells, filling same, 
Oliver Walker, desk, 

D. F. Coglin, iron for road scraper, 
Chas. K. Morton, postage, 

" " expenses to Brattleboro, 

" " car fares and expenses, 

H. Shumway, express on books for town clerk, 

Wm. Daugherty, painting hearse, 

Charles E. Clapp, jack screws, 

A. M. Peck, patching roof of hearse house, and 
labor in cemetery, 

J. S. Wells, stationery, 

E. Wright, team and repairing fire ladders, 
Delano & Hammond, legal services in 

pauper case, 9 00 
Delano & Hammond, legal services in 

liquor cases, 42 00 

S. S. Dwight, freight on howitzers, - 31 20 

N. T. Abells, drawing " 3 89 

Bridgman & Childs, stationery, 1 25 

" " public statutes and tax book, 5 00 

Mitchel Proulx, damage ferry road, 15 00 

N. T. Abells, cash paid for repairing tools, 2 10 

L. H. Kingsley, order book and tax bills, 6 25 

L. S. Crafts, care of water trough, 5 00 

A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 5 25 

C. D. Bardwell, labor and care of town hall, 10 00 

Wm. C. Dickinson, stationery, 2 00 
Wm. D. Billings, recording births, marriages 

and deaths, 18 65 



7 


00 


7 


00 


9 


69 


3 


00 


6 


00 


24 


26 


7 


45 


8 


50 


7 


50 


i 
6 


00 


1 


00 


2 


65 



Respectfully submitted. 



$249 14 



CHAS. K. MORTON. ) Selectmen 
RICHARD P. SMITH, [ of 
EUROTAS MORTON, ) Hatfield. 



Hatfield, March 3, 1883. 



13 

I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen of Hatfield for 
the year ending March 1, 1883, and I have found them correct 
with proper vouchers on file for all warrants drawn, amounting to 
seven thousand three hundred and eighty seven dollars and 
seventy two cents ($7,387. 72), 

DANIEL W. WELLS, Auditor. 

Hatfield, March 3, 1883. 



14 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1882. 

Schools, $1,500 00 

Poor, 1,000 00 

Repairs of school houses, 200 00 

Town officers, 600 00 

Highways, 1,000 00 

Interest, 220 00 

Repairs Town Hall, 150 00 

Town debt, 1,000 00 

Bridges, 500 00 

Oontingences, 500 00 

Gate cemetery, West Farms, 30 00 

Public Library, 225 00 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 

Moses W. Kingsley, Wm. H. Belden, 

Lewis S. Dyer, Champion B. Dickinson, 

Daniel W. Wells, Alpheus Cowles, 

Chas. K. Morton, Elfsha Hubbard, 

Samuel P. Billings, E. Seward Warner, 

J. H. Howard, Patrick Mullarney, 

Levi L. Pease, - Thomas P. Nolan, 

Michael Larkin, John E. Doane, 

Jacob Carl, J. A. Cutter, 

Chas. E. Hubbard, F. D. Billings, 

Oscar Belden, Geo. A. Billings, 
Henry S. Porter. 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 19, 1883. 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary town officers for the ensu- 
ing year, including one person for a member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the will of the late Oli- 
ver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of jurors as submitted by 
the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Treasurer and 
School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to defray 
the necessary expenses for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintenance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the coming year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the town. 

(15) 



16 

Art. 11. — To see if the town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library, and choose a Committee for the same. 

Art. 12. — To see if the town will by its vote or otherwise, 
ask the Legislature to extend to women who are citizens, the 
right to hold town offices, and to vote in town affairs on the 
same terms as male citizens. 

Art. 13. — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor of the town. 

Art. 14. — To hear the reports of the several Committees of 
the town and act thereon. 

Art. 15. — To see if the town will build gates at the cemetery 
at West Farms, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Art. 16. — To take action under chap. 100, section 5, of the 
Public Statutes. The vote must be by separate ballots, yes or no, 
in answer to the question, " shall licenses be granted for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors in this town?" 

Art. 17. — To see if the town will take action in relation to 
adopting by-laws. 

Art. 18. — To see if the town will take action in relation to 
relocating the highways of the town, and make an appropri- 
ation for the same. 

Art. 19. — To see if the town will take action in relation to 
the better preservation of the town records. 

Art. 20. — To see if the town will take action in relation to 
building a soldier's monument, and make an appropriation for 
the same. 

Art. 21. — To see if the town will make an appropriation to- 
ward the expenses of decorating soldier's graves. 

Art. 22. — To see if the town will purchase a refrigerator for 
the preservation of dead bodies. 

Art. 23. — To see if the town will by its vote, change the 
manner of calling Town Meetings. 

Art. 24. — To take action in relation to encroachments on the 
highways of the town. 



17 

Art. 25. — To see if the town will petition the board of Coun- 
ty Commissioners to lay out a new highway from a point oppo- 
site John B. Ryan's homestead, to the old Deerh'eld road. 

Art. 26. — To see if the town will make an appropriation to 
build the new ferry road to be ordered by the County Commis- 
sioners. 

Art. 27 — To see if the town will take action in relation to a 
petition of the Selectmen, for the repeal of Section 2, of Chapter 
274, 6f the Acts of 1882. This being an Act concerning the 
transportation of logs upon the Conn. River. 



Treasurer's Report. 



W. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, in account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 

» 

Balance in Treasury, March 8, 1882, $206 54 

To cash rec'd from Corporation Tax, $ 229 59 

National Bank Tax, 1,538 51 

State Aid, 210 00 

L. S. Bliss, license, 100 00 

Dog Fund, 48 87 

Income School Fund, 232 81 

Town of Hadley, over pay 

ferry account, 36 61 
D. W. Wells, administra- 
tor est. Sarah G. Morton, 45 29 
Sale of school books, 21 35 
Tuition Northampton 





scholars, 33 


00 








Tuition Whately scholars, 5 


00 








James Porter, for earth, 2 


00 








1ST. T. Abells, for old plank, 4 32 








0. L. Graves, Collector, 8,141 


58 


^10,648 


93 






9 


vo 




TO CASH RECEIVED FROM LOANS. 








State Treasurer, 4 per cent., $2,000 00 






tt a 


1,500 


00 






Hampshire 


Savings Bank, 5 per cent., 500 


00 


$4,000 


00 




(18) 







19 

CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 



State Treasurer, 4 per cent., 


$2,500 00 




" " 4} " 


1,000 00 




Hampshire Savings Bank, 5 percent., 


1,000 00 




a a a a a 


1,000 00 




(( a a (( a 


1,000 00 




Hampshire Co. Nat'l Bank, 5 per cent., 


500 00 


$7,000 00 






Balance due the Treasurer, 


i 


461 02 




£22,316 49 


Cr. 






By cash paid Selectmen's Orders, 




$7,336 30 


State Tax, 


$1,420 00 




County Tax, 


1,810 74 




Interest on Notes, 


249 45 


$3,480 19 






CASH PAID ON LOANS. 




State Treasurer, 


$2,500 00 




a a 


2,500 00 




a a 


2,000 00 


r 


a a 


1,000 00 




Hampshire Savings Bank, 


1,000 00 




a a a 


1,000 00 




a a it 


500 00 




a a (( 


500 00 




Hampshire County National Bank, 


500 00 






<fe1 1 KAA AA 




1 


\)J.A.fU\J\J \J\J 




£2,316 49 



In account with C. L. Graves, Collector. 
Dr. 
To Cash received, $8,141 58 

Orders of abatement, 23 82 

Discount on Taxes, 126 25 

$8,291 65 

Balance in hands of Collector, 373 25 

$8,664 90 



So 



Or 



By Assessor's Warrant, 18,636 46 

Interest on Taxes, 28 44 

$8,664 90 

SUMMARY. 

Slate Treasurer's Note, due April 7, 1883, $1,500 00 

due June 1, 1883, 2,000 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank Note, 



Due State Treasurer on license account, 
Outstanding orders, 
Due the Treasurer, 



500 00 


$4,000 00 
$537 44 


$ 25 00 

51 42 

461 02 



$4,537 44 
Due on E. F. Billings' Note, March 5, 1883, 16 85 



Indebtedness of the town, $4,520 59 

WM. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer of 

the Town of Hatfield and find them correct, and there is due 

the Treasurer from the Town of Hatfield the sum of four hun- 
dred sixty-one dollars and two cents ($461.02). 

DANIEL W. WELLS, Auditor. 
Hatfield,, March 5, 18£3, 



Report of School Committee 



The swiftly gliding years are calling again for the school re- 
port. What shall it be? 

We believe that during the last year much honest work has 
been done in our schools by teachers and pupils. That the high- 
est good of the children has been the aim of parents and instruct- 
ors, and that had there been a better understanding between 
them, this object would oftener have been obtained. Believing 
this, we cannot refrain from a word to the parents. The teach- 
ers are your assistants in training your children, that they may 
make useful men and women. Let it be your duty to know 
what they are doing, not only from the lips of your child, but 
by personal knowledge of the teacher, and observations of her 
school. 

During the year, several of our teachers have fallen from the 
ranks, and in each case to our regret. We are convinced that 
the services of an experienced teacher are worth more than those 
of a beginner, and if worth more why do we not pay more? It 
seems to us that the custom of the town in paying all our teach- 
ers the same price, no matter what their age and experience, and 
irrespective of the number of their pupils is hurtful and unjust. 
Again, that no higher wages are paid for our winter than our 
summer schools. The time of the year when the attendance is 
the largest, and usually the greatest regularity secured. As a 
town, we cannot afford to have that term a failure. Year after 
year it has proved so in first one, then another of our schools ; 
simply because the Committee have not had at their disposal 
means adequate to purchase the services of those who could ren- 

(21) 



22 

der them otherwise. We would recommend that the Commit- 
tee be authorized to make such changes in this respect as seem 
to them best, and that a somewhat larger sum be placed at their 
disposal for this purpose. 

It seemed best that in arithmetic, the text book should be 
changed, and after careful consideration, Franklin's was accept- 
ed. We think them well adapted to our needs, but that in 
nearly every case too little attention has been given to the Ele- 
mentary book, that the pupils would advance much more thor- 
oughly and satisfactorily in the higher book, could they be per- 
suaded to spend their time to first master the lower. The read- 
ing books have been used until many a child knows them by 
heart, so that they fail to reap the advantages desired from the 
lesson. Improvements are constantly being made in those pub- 
lications, and taking these considerations into view, we would 
advise a change of reading books the coming year. 

The appropriation of $200, raised for extra repairs, we have 
expended in painting the school buildings at North Hatfield, 
West Brook and West Hatfield. Kalsomining the school rooms 
at North Hatfield, West Brook, and repairing the blinds and 
shingling the school-house at West Hatfield. Expending in all 
$221.91. For items, we refer you to the Selectmen's report. 

STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EMPLOYED, 
AND NUMBER OF SCHOLARS. 

HILL DISTRICT — GRAMMAR. 

Miss Carrie S. Porter, 5 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, . 34 

Average membership, 29-J- 

Average attendance, 25^ 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

No. weeks of school, 35 

HILL DISTRICT — PRIMARY. 

Miss Emily G. Billings, 3 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, . ' 63 

Average membership, 46 

Average attendance, 40 

No. weeks of school, 35 



23 



CENTER DISTRICT — GRAMMAR. 



Miss Mary L. Waite, 1 term. Miss Eunice J. Morton, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 32 

Average membership, 21J 

Average attendance, 19f 

No. weeks of school, 35 

CENTER DISTRICT — PRIMARY. 

Miss Carrie L. Warner, 3 terms. 



No. of scholars enrolled, 








40 


Average membership, 








35 


Average attendance, 








30 


No. weeks of school, 








35 


WEST 


FARMS DISTRICT. 






Miss Nellie A. Waite, 2 terms. 


Miss Maggie E. 


Robbins, 


1 term. 


No. of scholars enrolled, 








21 


Average membership, 








18| 


Average attendance, 








17 3-10 


No. weeks of school, 








35 



WEST BROOK DISTRICT. 

Miss Martha Gardner, 3 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 30 

Average membership, 24f 

Average attendance, 21f 

No. weeks of school, 35 

WEST HATFIELD DISTRICT. 

Miss Myra E. Parsons, 2 terms. Eleanor H. Kirk, 1 term. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 57 

Average membership, 41f 

Average attendance, 39 

No. weeks of school, 35 

The wages paid teachers were uniform, it being six dollars per 
week, including board. 



24 

APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 

Balance unexpended last year, $ 25 43 

Appropriated by the town, 
Rec'd from Mass. State School Fund, 
u Dog Fund, 
" " Norhampton for tuition, 



Amt. expended for teachers and board, 
" " " wood and coal, 

" " " care of school houses, 

" " " maps and books, 

Balance unexpended, 



1,500 


00 


232 


81 


48 


87 


33 


00 


11,470 


00 


220 


35 


41 


80 


19 


05 


88 


91 



$1,840 11 



$1,840 11 



On account of the sickness of the Chairman of the Commit- 
tee, some bills properly belonging to this account have not been 
presented. These bills would considerably reduce the unex- 
pended balance, 

No. of children between 5 and 15, 299 

No. of pupils enrolled, 278 

No. of scholars between 5 and 15, 299 

No. of scholars between 8 and 14, 184 
Average attendance, 193 1-20 

No. of scholars over 15 years of ,age, 2 

Under 5 years of age, 

H. G. MOQRE, ) School 
C. M. BARTON, ( Committee. 



Report of Library Committee, 



The town, at its last annual meeting, appropriated $225 for 
the purposes of the Public Library. We have expended the 
money as follows : 



Paid for rebinding and repairing books, 


$1L5 38 


new books, 


78 98 


E. F. Billings, services as librarian, 


25 00 


Incidental expenses, 


5 94 



Total, 1225 30 

The Committee, believing that the money expended for Li- 
brary purposes is as productive of good results as any that the 
town appropriates, would recommend an appropriation of $200 
for the Public Library the coming year. 

The following is a list of books purchased the last year : 

A Reverend Idol. 

From Hand to Hand. 

Pride and Passion. 

History of the United States. 6 Vols. 

From the Lakes of Killarney to the Golden Horn. 

Spain and the Spaniards. 

Morocco, its People and Places. 

Holland and its People. 

Constantinople. 

Henry W. Longfellow. 

Experiences of a Barrister. 

(25) 



26 



Camp on the Rockies. 

The African Crusoes. 

Voyages and Adventures of Marco Polo. 

Voyages and Adventures of Vasco de Gam a. 

Adventures and Conquests of Magelleu. 

Adventures and Conquests of Pizarro. 

Exploits and Voyages of Raleigh. 

Wild Man of the West. 

Gascoine, the Sandal Wood Trader. 

Shifting Winds. 

Gorilla Hunters. 

Three Months Rustication. 

Politics for Young Americans. 

Blessed Saint Certainty. 

The Bridal March. 

Dorothea. 

Aschenbroedel. 

Anne. 

The Marquis of Cserabas. 

An English Daisy Miller. 

A Daughter of Heth. 

Adventures of a Phaeton. 

Green Pastures and Piccadilly. 

Monarch of Mincing Lane. 

Warlock O'Glen Wallock. 

Bits from Blink Bonny. 

An Egyptian Princess. 2 Vols. 

The Desmond Hundred. 

Mary Annerly. 

Green Mountain Boys. 

The Sword of Damocles. 

Only a Girl. 

Hulda. 

Why did He Not Die ? 

Servia. 

Young Folks History of the War. 

A Family Flight. 

The Flowers of the Sky. 

Pleasant Ways in Science. 

Our Place among Infinities. , 



27 

The Expanse of Heaven. 

Conflict of Christianity with Heathenism. 

Dr. Grimshaw's Secret. 

Dr. Zay. 

Our Saints. 

Her Object in Life. 

George at the Wheel. 

Poganuc People. 

Off to the Wilds. 

A Transplanted Eose. 

Harper's for 1882. 

Scribner's for 1882. 

Atlantic for 1882. 

A Doubting Heart. 

For the Committee. 

F. D. BILLINGS, 

Hatfield, March, 1883. 



t 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN, 

Treasurer, Tax Collector, Town Clerk, 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



AND 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE, 



OF 



THE TOWN OF HATFIELD, 

For the Year Ending March 1st, 1884. 



HATFIELD, MASS.: 
POWER PRESS OF L. H. KINGSLEY. 

1884. 



Selectmen's Eeport. 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield : 

$We have been able to limit our expenditures nearly to the 
amount of the appropriations, with the exception of the bridge 
account. 

You will remember that we reported last year that the north 
abutment of Mill bridge was in an unsafe condition, and that it 
would be required to be rebuilt. But at the Town meeting, it 
was reported that the wall had been examined by an expert and 
pronounced safe, only needing patching near the top, and that 
could be done for one hundred dollars. We interviewed the 
"expert," intending to contract the work to him. He was 
willing to undertake it for four dollars a day. We employed 
other men and began to take down the wall, and found it built 
of small stones upon shelving rock. We were only surprised 
that it had stood so long, (about forty years. ) We built a coffer 
dam and leveled the rock at the bottom, procured large stones 
and laid a new wall in cement. We know the work was 
thorough, and we think the cost reasonable, considering that 
we began expecting only to patch the old wall. The cost was 
a little less than seven hundred dollars. As the appropriation 
was only five hundred dollars for bridges, we report the defi- 
ciency. 



Mill bridge we have repaired to some extent, and it will prob- 
ably be safe for two or three years. The river bridge on the de- 
pot road will need to be rebuilt the coming season. We have 
ordered a bill of lumber for that, and for some other repairs. 

The Selectmen of Hadley, with our approval, have sold the 
ferry boat and wire to a Hadley man, for four hundred dollars, 
a little more thun their cost. One hundred and fifty dollars 
have been paid, and the balance will be paid in installments, 
the towns holding security on the boat. We think the reloca- 
ting of the ferry has increased its value. 

The Poor account is smaller than for several years, (taking 
out what is due from the Commonwealth,) though exceeding 
our estimate by about fifty dollars. There is no probability 
that the paupers can be supported for any less the coming year. 

We have paid for the land purchased of the New Haven and 
Northampton Co., last year, out of the appropriation for special 
repairs on highways, and have distributed considerable work 
throughout the town. 

Our expenditures, in detail, have been as follows : 

OLD BILLS. 

Geo. A. Wolfram, janitor, $6 70 

Francis Eemillard, " 10 50 

K. P. Smith, salary Selectman, 50 00 

Eurotas Morton, " " 58 00 

Chas. K. Morton, " ". 125 00 

Dr. C. M. Barton, " School Committee, 25 00 

A. H. Graves, " " 35 00 

C. L. Graves, Collector of Taxes, 100 00 

Wm. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, 50 00 

Wm. Ware & Co., exchanging school books, 37 42 

E. C. Davis, making estimates stone work, 6 50 

Gazette Printing Co., printing town reports, 37 80 

Frederick Pease, labor highway, 21 00 

W. L. Smith & Co., coffins poor, 21 00 

James Kelly, services janitor, 10 50 

P. Jubinville, sharpening drills, 1 25 

C. L. Graves, tax on town land, , 2 55 

Dr. C. M. Barton, cash paid for school sup. 11 12 

$609 34 



SCHOOLS. 
Mary H. Warner, teaching, 
Martha D. Gardner, 
Laura E. Sanderson, 
Carrie L. Warner, 
Eunice J. Morton, 
Miss Clough, 
Carrie S. Porter, 
Carrie M. Westover, 
Mrs. K T. Abells, ' 
Nellie A. Waite, 
Julia Phelps, 
M. E. Eobbins, 
Iola L. Pearl, 
Carrie Holden, 
Kimball & Cary, coal, 
W. D. Clapp, 
Smith & D wight, <\ 
Wm. H. Belden, " and drawing, 
John E. Doane, wood, 
Dr. C. M. Barton, cash for wood, 
H. Shumway, drawing wood, 
Philos Doane, sawing " 
E. A. Briggs, " ■ • " 
Francis Eemillard, janitor, 
Joseph Clery, £i 

John Burke, Jr., " 



$241 00 


217 


00 


151 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


86 


00 


66 


00 


31 


80 


30 


00 


132 


00 


65 


00 


66 


00 


84 00 


84 


00 


4 21 


9 


72 


188 


•50 


20 


23 


8 


50 


5 


65 


2 


00 


6 


25 


5 


00 


3 


75 


3 


75 


3 


00 



11,794 36 



POOR 

P. Doppman, cash support, $25 00 

Mrs. Thaddeus Graves, house rent, 28 00 

Mary Wheeler, board of Letty Wheeler, 78 00 

N. L. Hospital, board of Emily Brenette, 19 37 

" A. M. Richmond, 183 59 

" Catherine Tobin, 107 56 

Thomas Buckley, board of Barney McHugh, 61 00 

Clifford Russell, " Patrick Russell, 113 00 



6 

J. H. Howard, groceries Michael Kyan $72 00 

E. P. Smith, wood, " " 6 25 

Wm. Lyons, meat bill, " " 28 00 

A. M. Peck, milk, 10 08 

Chas. K. Morton, cash for Martin children, 27 21 

Home for Little Wanderers, " " 50 00 

D. J. Wright, groceries Jane Stone, 99 00 
State of Mass. , board of Penny Wheeler, 30 71 
Conrad Wensell, care and damage on account 

of Jacob Musse, 26 00 

A. M. Peck, procuring coffin and services, 6 00 

W. L. Smith & Co., 12 00 

Dr. Seymour, med. attendance, 4 00 

" " Catherine Tobin, 2 00 

L. P. Dole, board James Shea, 30 00 

Town of Northampton, board Wm. Balor, 39 05 

E. P. Smith, wood Mrs. Kennedy, 11 00 
J. H. Howard, groceries " 8 66 
G. M. Smith, goods Peter Pecor, 9 50 
Eurotas Morton, lodging tramps, 2 00 
Michael Boyle, • " " 3 00 
T. Baggs, 1 00 
Philos Doane, sawing wood Mrs. Kennedy, 1 75 
L. S. Bliss, house rent M. Eyan, 6 00 



HIGHWAYS. 

N. T. Abells, $550 00 

HIGHWAYS — SPECIAL. 

John McGrath, labor, $3 00 

Wm. B. Langdon, 17 50 

Lewis Murry, 7 50 

Nicholas Burke, 2 50 

Joseph Schepp, 6 75 

New Haven & Northampton Co., land, 100 00 

John Holdfeelder, labor, 6 75 

John Sheehan, 7 50 

Pred. Breor, 7 50 



$1,100 



(6 



E. A. Briggs, labor, 


$6 00 


John Steele, 


4 50 


N. T. Abells, 


27 50 


No. Hatfield, 


29 00 


John Fitzgibbon, 


5 00 


Geo. Dennis, 


7 50' 


John B. Kyan, 


23 50 


John McHugh, 


12 00 


Frederick Carl, 


10 50 


Lewis Eaboin, 


3 50 


Wm. M. Jones, 


10 50 


Thomas O'Hara, 


3 75 


Hosea Wheeler, 


1 50 


Daniel Garvey, 


1 50 


George Pfifer, 


1 50 


Leander Oooley, 


7 00 


Michael O'Dea, 


300 


Frank Cotton, 


2 25 


H. Shumway, 


17 50 


John Holdfeelder, 


1 50 


Eleazer Cooley, 


10 00 


Philip Carl, 


7 00 


Chas. E. Kingsley, 


1 50 


Michael Boyle, 


2 25 


Eobert McGrath, 


4 50 


Wm. D. Dennis, 


2 25 


Henry Dwight, 


1 50 


Henry R. Graves, 


10 00 


Michael O'Dea, 


2 25 


Wm. M. Jones, 


4 50 


H. S. Porter, 


14 00 


" earth, 


14 00 


1ST. T. Abells, line stones ferry road, 


7 50 


Daniel A. Vining, labor, 


15 00 


Wm. Carson, 


3 00 


David Payer, 


2 00 


Joseph Newman, 


4 50 


Eurotas Morton, 


13 00 



Chas. K. Morton, labor, 


- $22 50 


Philip Carl, 


3 50 


John Batzold, 


6 00 


Wm. Boyle, 


7 50 


John O'Neil, 


7 50 


John Steele, 


7 50 


BKIDGES. 




H. W. Clapp, lumber, 


$17 20 


K T. Abells, labor, 


16 50 


Mrs. Elisha Hubbard, plank, 


30 44 


H. W. Clapp, lumber, 


44 96 


John Steele, labor, 


4 50 


Jacob Cartier, 


27 30 


George Steele, 


• 29 55 


John Kiley, 


17 30 


K T. Abells, 


133 20 


Eobert Trainer, 


63 40 


John Batzold, 


7 96 


John St otter, 


21 00 


James Mullins, 


41 60 


Frank Cotton, 


27 50 


E. P. Hall & Co., lumber for coffer-dam, 


9 60 


Town of Whately, use of derrick, 


20 58 


John Landy, stone and drawing, 


79 50 


John Powers, labor, 


1 50 


Joseph Kleasner, 


3 75 


Daniel Garvey, 


2 48 


Frank I. Washburn, rope and spikes, 


14 92 


J. A. Sullivan, cement, 


46 40 


John McHugh, labor, 


15 23 


Wm. Boyle, 


3 98 


Peter Saffa, 


41 60 


John Chandler, 


1 50 


John Sheehan, 


11 25 


N". T. Abells, labor and cash, 


11 33 


" " bridge Pantry road, 


10 20 



$511 25 



Joseph Newman, labor. 


$3 00 


John Steele, 


8 76 


Chas. K. Morton, labor and lumber, 


26 59 


J. H. Howard, nails, 


1 00 


Michael O'Dea, labor, 


7 50 


E. A. Burt, 


2 00 


H. Shumway, drawing stone, 


34 00 


Michael Boyle, labor, 


1 50 


Wm. D. Dennis, 


75 


N. Day & Bros., lumber, 


6 36 


Wells W. Ayer & Co., spikes, 


3 10 


N. T. Abells, drawing plank and lumber, 


15 00 


" labor bridges and railings, 


56 45 


" stone work Hill bridge, 


9 00 


John E. Doane, lumber, 


20 96 


Eurotas Morton, lumber and posts, 


59 00 


S. W. Kingsley, iron work, 


14 78 




*i o°5 OS 




<pi,v*y CO 


SALARIES. 


- 


E. F. Billings, notifying Town officers, 




copying and posting warrants, 


$18 20 


" Assessor, 


71 25 


*' " Valuation list, 


11 25 


H. S. Hubbard, Assessor, 


62 00 


Henry E. Graves, " 


63 75 


Wm. D. Billings, Town Clerk, 


50 00 


Dr. C. M. Barton, School Committe, 


50 00 


Wm. Barnes, Special Constable, 


2 00 




fqoo AK 




qp0.vO rtO 


STATE AID. 




Mrs. U. B. Graves, 


$48 00 


Ruth Dennis, 


56 00 


Minerva Anderson, 


48 00 


Elizabeth Coville, 


48 00 


Peter Cartier, 


6 00 




$206 00 



10 





FERRY ROAD. 




John Steele, labor, 




$1 95 


Frank Cotton, 




6 75 


Michael O'Dea, 




6 00 


Joseph Kleasner, 




3 00 


John Chandler, 




2 25 


N. T. Abells, 




30 50 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS. 

A. L. Strong, repairs, $11 84 

Mrs. John Chandler, cleaning, 5 00 

Mrs. John O'Keil, " " % 9 00 

J. H. Howard, supplies, 8 95 

D. J. Wright, door mat, 3 05 

E. P. Hall & Co. , lumber, 22 50 
P. Doppman, repairs, 9 15 
E. A. Hubbard, supplies, 8 73 
Jerry Brown & Co., mason work, 3 50 
Joseph Champaign, repairing roof, 4 40 
L. P. Dole, repairs, ' 2 00 
S. W. Kingsley, repairs, 4 75 
¥m. B. Langdon, repairs, 3 25 
Eames & Sprague, stoves and repairs, 46 84 
E. M. Martin, supplies, 2 21 
Dr. C. M, Barton, supplies, 17 62 



LIBRARY. 




J. H. Howard, oil, etc. , 


$4 16 


E. F. Billings, librarian, 


25 00 


" cash for lock, 


35 


S. E. Bridgman & Co., books, 


126 81 



$50 45 



M62 79 



11 



MEMORIAL DAY EXPENSES. 



Hatfield Cornet Band, • $25 00 

Arthur Bennett, janitor, 1 00 

Oliver Ditson & Co., sheet music, 3 50 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Chas. L. Graves, cash for printing, 
N. T. Abells, services for R. R. Committee, 
S. P. Billings, 
N. W. Quint, casket cooler, 
Metcalf & Co., printing Assessors' blanks. 
S. E. Bridgman & Co., blanki^ooks, etc., 
H. Shumway, express on books, 
A. M. Peck, trimming Cemetery hedge, 
" recording deaths, 

" cash for repairs, 

R. P. Smith, wood for Town Hall, 
Dr. W. H. Pollard, examining horse, 
S. W. Kingsley, repairing scraper, 
labor Town Hall, 
W. L. Smith & Co., cloth for Hall table, 
E. C. Davis, advice Mill bridge, 
Gazette Printing Co., printing, 

Wm. G. Bassett, legal services Everett case, 12 00 
Costs Franklin County Court, 
N. T. Abells, -repairs town tools, 
H. S. Gere, advertising, 
D. W. Wells, services as Elector, 
C. D. Bardwell, janitor Town Hall, 
Eurotas Morton, for cemetery gates, 
Wm. D. Billings, recording and returning 

births, marriages and deaths, 20 95 

Ansel Wright, serving warrant on C. R. 

Lumber Co , 1 08 

W. C. Dickinson, postage, 2 00 



$2 


00 


2 


50 


25 


00 


32 


82 


8 


00 


6 


61 


5 


15 


15 


50 


7 


25 


2 


25 


6 


00 


3 


50 


4 


00 


2 


75 




75 


5 


00 


4 


41 


12 


00 


10 


00 


4 


50 


1 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


50 


00 



$29 50 



12 



Chas. K. Morton, cash paid witnesses Mrs. 

R. Bardwell case, 5 00 
" expenses Boston and West- 

boro with Martin children, 9 00 

" " cash paid for teams, etc., 7 60 

" " postage, 2 00 



$283 62 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. K. MORTON, ) Selectmen 
EUROTAS MORTON, [ of 
R. P. SMITH. ) Hatfield. 



Hatfield, March, 6, 1884. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, for the 
year ending March 1, 1884, and have found them correct, 
with proper vouchers on file for all warrants drawn, amount- 
ing to Six thousand eight hundred and eight dollars and 
seventy-two cents. ($6,808.72.) Of this amount, there are 
orders for $169.21 which have not been presented for pay- 
ment. 

C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 7, 1884. 



13 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1883. 



Public Library, 

Poor, 

Bridges, 

Special Repairs Highways, 

Schools, 

Town Officers, 

Contingencies, 

Town Debt, 

Cemetery gates West Farms, 

Decoration Day Expenses, 

Refrigerator, 

Ferry Road, 

Deficiencies, 

Highways and Bridges, 

Interest, 



$200 00 


1,000 


00 


500 


00 


500 


00 


1,500 


00 


600 


00 


500 


00 


1,000 


00 


50 00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 00 


700 00 


550 


00 


220 


00 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 

Lewis S. Dyer, Wm. H. Belden, 

Daniel W. Wells, Champion B. Dickinson, 

T - m i p p.n >lTrmT> 7?osut/f~BiiU'y>Gi Alpheus Cowles, 
Samuel P. Billings, Joseph S. Wells, 

J. H. Howard^ . Chas. L. Cowles, 

Chas. Potter, , Peter Saffa, 

Michael Larkin, John E. Doane, 

Jacob Carl, Patrick Mullanny, 

Chas E. Hubbard, J. A. Cutter, 

Oscar Belden, J. E. Porter, 

Chas. D. Bartlett, Thos. M. Dea, 

Henry S. Porter. 



14 



AKTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOE TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 17, 1884. 

Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2 — To choose all necessay town officers for the ensuing- 
year, including one person for a member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. 

Art. 3 — To choose an Elector under the will of the late Oliver 
Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4 — To receive and accept the list of jurors as submitted by 
the Selectmen. 

Art. 5 — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Treasurer and 
School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 
Art. 7 — To take action in relation to raising money, to defray 
the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8 — To see what method the town will adopt for the main- 
tenance and repairs of Highways and Bridges the ensuing year. 

Art. 9 — To see what action the town will take in relation to the 
prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 10 — To see if the town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the town. 

Art. 11 — To see if the town will make an appropriation for the 
Public Library, and choose a Committee for the same. 

Art. 12 — To take action in relation to the support of the poor 
of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 13 — To hear the report of the several Committees of the 
town and act thereon. 



15 

Art. 14 — To take action under Chapter 100, Section 5, of the 
Public Statutes. The vote must be by separate ballots, yes or 
no, in answer to the question, "shall licenses be granted for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town ?'" 

Art. 15 — To sec if the town will make an appro] rria lion to de- 
fray the expenses of celebrating " Memorial Day/ 7 

Art. 16 — To see if the town will vote to ask the County Com- 
missioners to establish a Truant School. 

Art. 17 — To see if the town will adopt By-Laws concerning 
truant children. 

Art. 18 — To see if the town will vote to pay a bounty for the 
killing of noxious animals and birds. 

Art. 19— To see if the town will take action in relation to relo- 
cating the Highways of the town. 
Art. 20 — To see if the town will elect a Superintendent of 

schools. 

Art. 21 — To see if the town will take action in relation to the 

Cemeteries of the town. 

Art. 22 -To see if the town will appoint a Valu t'ioii Commit t c 

Art. 23 — To see if the town will take action in relation to de- 
fending any Law suits against the town. 

Art. 24 — To see if the town will pay L. P. Dole money, on re- 
count of James Shea. 

Art. 25 — To take action in relation to money due the town 
from Smith Charities, on account of wrong appoifionnHTii. 

Art. 26 — To see if the town will employ a teacher of music in 
the schools. 



Treasurer's Report, 



Wm. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, in account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 
To cash rec'd from C. L. Graves, Coll., $7,005 91 
National Bank Tax, 1,706 10 
Corporation Tax, 285 43 

State Aid, 210 00 

Income of School Fund, 180 83 
Dog Fund, 62 79 

Town of Hadley, for ferry 

road, 35 00 

E. F. Billings' Note, 17 75 

S. W. Kingsley, timber, 12 00 
Burial of State paupers, 10 00 



Rent of Town Hall, 5 00 



,530 81 



TO CASH RECEIVED FROM LOANS. 

State Treasurer, 4^ per cent., $2,000 00 

" . " " " 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 5 per cent, 1,000 00 



$4,500 00 



CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 5 per cent., $1,000 00 
" " " " " 500 00 



$1,500 00 
$15,530 81 



17 



Cr. 
Due the Treasurer from old account, $461 02 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $6,639 58 

Old orders. 51 42 

County Tax, 1,492 15 

State Tax, 900 00 

Interest on Notes, 212 85 

State Treasurer, license acct., 25 00 

$9,321 00 

BY CASH PAID ON LOANS. % 

State Treasurer, $2,000 00 

" " 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 500 00 

$4,000 00 

CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, $1,000 .00 

" " " 500 00 

• $1,500 00 

Balance in Treasury, , $248 79 



.5,530 81 



In ACCOUNT WITH C. L. 


Graves 


, Collector. 


Br. 








To Cash received, 




$7,005 91 




Orders of abatement, 




731 98 




Discount on Taxes, 




94 04 










$7,831 93 






Balance in hands of Collector, 






$1,027 36 




$8,859 29 


Cr. 








By Balance from old account, 






$373 25 


Assessors' Warrant, 




$8,465 59 




Interest on Taxes, 




20 45 


$8,486 04 







S,859 29 



18 



SUMMARY. 



State Treasurer's Note, due Apr. 7, 1884, $1,500 00 

" " " " June 1, 1884, 2,000 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank Note, 1,000 "00 



Outstanding Orders, 



Gash in Treasury, 

Uncollected Taxes, 

Due from State and Military Aid, 

State on account State paupers, 48 00 
County y 2 cost line stones, 3 25 

C. S. Shattuck, for laying wall, 23 72 
City of Northampton, for tuition, 18 00 







$4,500 


00 






169 


21 




$4,669 


21 


- $248 


79 






1,027 


36 






198 


00 







,567 12 



Balance against the Town, $3,102 09 

Wm. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 



I have this day examined the books and vouchers of the 
Treasurer, and have found them correct. 

C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 7, 1884. 



Town Clerk's Report, 



To the Selectmen of the Town of Hatfield. 

Gejstlemen : — I respectfully present to you my first annual 
report. 

The vital statistics are as follows : 





BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 






NO. 


MALES. 


FEMALES. 


January, 

February, 

March, 


2 
2 
2 


2 
2 
1 


1 


April, 

May, 

June, 


1 
1 

4 


1 
4 


1 


July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 


5 
3 

1 

1 


3 

2 
1 
1 


2 
1 


November, 


2 




2 


December, 


3 


3 





Total, 



27 



20 



PARENTAGE. 

Native born, 7; Foreign born, 13. 
Foreign born father and native born mother, 7. 
Birth rate for five preceding years : 

1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 

40 35 37 33 



1882, 
24 



20 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 



January, 












2 


February, 












1 


March, 












1 


April, 










. 


1 


June, 












3 


September, 












- 2 


October, 












4 


November, 












1 


December, 












2 


Total, 17 


Of the whole number there was : 


First marriage of both parties, 15 couples 


Second (i 


(t 


i t 






1 


i ( 



of male and first of female, 



Total, 17- 

Age of youngest bridegroom, 21 years, 
bride, 17 " 

" oldest bridegroom, 69 " 
" bride, 62 " 

Of the whole number married, there were : 
Under 20 years of age, 4 females. 

Between 20 and 30 years of age, 14 males, 10 " 

" 30 << 40 " 2 " 2 

" 60 " 70 " 1 (i 1 " 

All of the persons married were native born. 
Number of marriage certificates issued from this office, 16. 
Marriages for the five previous years : 



1878, 1879, 


1880, 


1881, 


1882, 


11 


13 11 12 
DEATHS BY MONTHS. 


6 


January, 

February, 

March, 










1 
2 
4 


April, 

May, 

June, 










3 

7 
2 


October, 










4 


November, 










3 


December, 










3 



Total, 



29 



21 

Under 5 years of age, 7 males, 2 females. 

Between 5 and 10 years of age, 



10 ". 


20, 


20 " 


30, 


30 << 


40, 


40 " 


50, 


50 <{ 


60, 


60 " 


70, 


70 " 


80, 


80 « 


90, 







1 






1 


2 


a 




1 


a 




3 


iC 


1 


1 


a 




2 


a 


2 

3 


1 


a 


2 



17 12 

The oldest person deceased was a female, 85 years, 6 months. 
The death rate for five preceding years : 

1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 

28 25 26 23 25 

Causes of death classified according to the nomenclature 
adopted by the State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 



Croup, 
Diphtheria, 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


OOail id Li lid, 

Typhus Fever, 

Cerebro Spinal Meningitis, 

Remittent Fever, 


CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 




Mortification, 
Phthisis, 


1 

2 


LOCAL DISEASES. 




Apoplexy, 

Cephalitis, 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

Disease Brain, 
" Heart, 
' ' Liver, 
' ' Kidney, 

Brights Disease, 


1 
1 
6 
5 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Killed by New Haven and Northampton Rail Road, 



22 



STATEMENT OF THE DOG TAX ACCOUNT. 

Wm. D. Billings, Town Clerk, In account with the Town 
of Hatfield. 

Dr. 
To cash received from Dec. 1, 1882, to Dec. 
1, 1883, for licenses of 42 dogs, (males,) 
at $2 each, $84 00 

To cash rec'd for license 1 dog, (female,) 5 00 



$89 00 

Less Clerk's fees, 43 dogs, at 20 cents each, 8 60 



$80 40 



Cr. 
December 3, 1883. 
By cash paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, $80 40 

The amount paid into the County Treasury on this account 
for the five previous years, was in 

1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 

$102.20. $73.80. $77.40. $59.40. $63.00 

There have been recorded during the year: 
23 Mortgages of Personal Property. 5 Assignment of Wages. 
All other papers, 1. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



Report of School Committee. 



Perhaps in no one of the reports are so many of our people 
interested as in that of the schools; children as well as parents 
reading to see if it agrees with their opinion. 

We would scan the past year, not to praise or censure any one, 
but only hoping that some hints may be gained which will aid 
the work of the coming year. 

As we passed from one school room we took with us this 
thought: How they are working there ! Not a moment seemed 
wasted, and the animated faces showed the interest. When the 
last day came we could take the book, hear a review, and pro- 
nounce a "well done" for teacher and pupils. And this is true, 
not only of one school and one term, but of the majority of the 
schools most of the terms. 

While we enjoy hearing the children in pieces and dialogues, 
and seeing their increasing skill with crayon and pen, we regret 
to find these, in some cases, taking the prominent place, while 
the lessons are shortened or slighted to give the required time. 

During the fall term, Walton's cards were introduced into 
the schools and have met a long felt need. Now it is a pleasure 
to note the proficiency of even the little ones in the multiplica- 
tion table. In last year's report a change of Reading books was 
recommended; that change has been made during the past term, 
with satisfactory results. If a still greater variety could be ob- 
tained, by the occasional introduction of newspapers or maga- 
zines, we think it would be well. 

We propose_to hold examinations to test the qualification of 
pupils to enter the Grammar schools from the Primary, and also 
in all the schools for scholars proposing to advance to higher 



24 

classes. This has been done to some extent the past year, and 
it is expected by this means to correct the prevalent evil of pu- 
pils being pushed by their parents, and by some injudicious 
teachers, into books which are too difficult for them to study 
with profit. It will also stimulate the children by making their 
advance, step by step, a more marked and noticeable event. 

The absence of Mr. Hubbard, during most of the year, has 
been regretted. We had expected great aid from his wide expe- 
rience; deprived of that, we have passed through the perplexi- 
ties of our office dependent on our own judgment. 

Teachers have been selected only when recommended by pre- 
vious experience and success, yet even this has not secured us 
all desired. Whenever called to the support of a teacher we 
have endeavored to respond heartily and thoroughly, believing 
in no other way could future peace be secured. 

For several years the large number and varied ages of the pu- 
pils at West Hatfield, during the winter term, have demanded 
attention. We think at slight expense a recitation room might 
be fitted up there for an assistant teacher, and so afford time for 
a more careful supervision of individuals, which the class of 
pupils attending demands, that the school may take an equal 
rank with the others in town. 

HILL DISTRICT — GRAMMAR. 

Miss Nellie A. Waite, 2 terms. Miss Iola L. Pearl, 1 term. 
No. of scholars enrolled, 38 

Average membership, 34^' 

Average attendance, 30^ 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

No. weeks of school, 34 

HILL DISTIRCT — PRIMARY. 

Miss Marion B. Clough, 1 term. Miss Julia E. Phelps, 1 term. 
Miss Carrie B. Holden, 1 term. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 49 

Average membership, 36 

Average attendance, 31 

No. weeks of school, 33 



25 



CENTER DISTRICT — GRAMMAR. 

Miss Carrie S. Porter, 1 term. Miss Eunice J. Morton, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 28 

Average membership, 25 y 2 

Average attendance, 22^ 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

No. weeks of school, 34 

CENTER DISTRICT — PRIMARY. 

Miss Mary H. Warner, 1 term. Miss Carrie L. Warner, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 45 

Average membership, 31^ 

Average attendance, 28 

No. weeks of school, 34 

WEST BROOK DISTRICT. 

Miss Martha Gardner, 3 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, ; 37 

Average membership, 28 

Average attendance, 25^ 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

No. weeks of school, 34 

WEST FARMS DISTRICT. 

Maggie E. Bobbins, 1 term. Laura A. Sanderson, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 30 

Average membership, 24^ 

Average attendance, 23 

No. weeks of school, 34 

WEST HATFIELD DISTRICT. 

Miss Carrie M. Westover, and Mrs. Abells, 1 term. 
Miss Mary H. Warner, 2 terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 54 

Average membership, 47 

Average attendance, 42 

No. scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

No. weeks of school, 35 



$51 


21 






1,500 


00 






188 


83 






62 


79 










$1,802 


83 






$1,533 


80 






249 


46 






10 


50 






9 


07 










$ 1,802 83 



26 



APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 

Balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriated by the town, 
Rec'd from State School Fund, 
" Dog Fund, 

Amt. expended for teachers and board, 
" " " wood and coal, 

Si " " care of school houses, 

Balance unexpended, 



There are about Seventy dollars in unpaid bills, which leaves 
an actual deficiency of $60.79. 

Teachers' wages have been increased from the six dollars per 
week, which has been paid for a few years past, to seven dollars 
including board. This became necessary to retain some of our 
best teachers. To reduce the deficiency arising from this course, 
we have shortened the Winter terms one week each. If we add 
to the aggregate increase of teacher's wages, the amount neces 
sary to employ an assistant teacher at West Hatfield, during the 
Winter term, an appropriation of $400, in excess of the ap- 
propriation for schools last year, will be needed to maintain the 
schools the usual 35 weeks for the year. 

No. of children between 5 and 15, 284 

" " pupils enrolled, 281 

" " scholars between 5 and 15, 278 

"« " " 8 and 14, 201 

Average attendance, 202 J^ 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

Under 5 years of age, 2 



H. G. MOORE, | School 
C. M. BARTON, j Co?nmittee. 



27 

LIST OF BOOKS BOUGHT FOE HATFIELD PUBLIC 
LIBRARY, 1883. 
Unknown to History. 
On the Threshold. 
Deacon Crankie. 
The Col.'s Daughter. 
Vicar of Wakefield. 
Story of a Bad Boy. 
Light of Asia. 

Ward's Etiquette. i 

Guardian Angel. 
But yet a Woman. 
Whom Kathie Married. 
Hot Plowshares. 
Life on the Mississippi. 
Which? Right or Wrong. 
Story of Roland. 
Dr. Claudies. 
Paal and Persis. 
His Triumph. 
His Sombre Rivals. 
A Woman's Reason. 
Seven Stories. 
A Wronged Wife. 
Life* of Mary Lamb. 
Shelley's Letters. 
Queenie Hetherton. 
A Woman of Honor. 
Beyond the Gates. 
Banned and Blest. 
Boy Travelers in Central Africa. 
Winners in Life's Race. 
Life and her Children. 
Life of Gen. John A. Dix, 2 Vols. 

I Walks in Rome. 
History of the Civil War. Comte DeParis, Vol. 3rd. 
Not of Man. 
Vagabondia. 
The old Woman who lived in a Shoe. 



28 

Janet. 

Stephen, the Schoolmaster. 

Phil and his Friends. 

Don Gordon's Shooting Box. 

Vestigia. 

Under the Sun. 

Bread Winners. 

The Clayton Kangers. 

Rifle and Hound. 

Harpers 1883, 2 Vols. 

Atlantic (i 

Century " " 

Fairy Land of Science. 

History of Mexico. 

Dorring Court. 

Floyd Grandon's Honor. 

Judith. 

Ben Hur. 

Beatrix Randolph. 

Ned in the Block House. 

Newport. 

A Great Treason. 

Hester. 

Lances of Linwood. 

Our Bovs in China. 

Tinkham Bro.'s Tide Mill. 

Voyages and adventures of Drake, the Sea King. 

Donal Grant. 

Weighed and Wanting. 

Among the Holy Hills. 

On the Desert. 

Biblical Study. 

The Mikado's Empire. 

Josephus. 

Retrospect of a long Life. 

Recollections of a Drummer Boy. 

The Queen's Body Guard. 

Dust. 

Brook's Sermons in English Chapels. 

Yonge's History of France. 

" England. 

" Rome. 



ANNUAL REPOET8 



OF THE 



SELECTMEN, 

Treasurer, Tax Collector, Town Clerk, 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND 



Library Committee 



OP THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 1st, 1885. 



NOBTHAMPTCKff, MASS.: 

WADE, WARNER & CO., PRINTERS. 

1885. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

The appropriations for the highways and bridges would 
have been ample under ordinary circumstances, but the 
flood or water-spout in the west part of the town washed 
the roads to such a degree that it seemed at first impossible 
to repair them, for want of earth. There really seemed to 
be nothing but stones in sight. We succeeded, however, by 
expending about five hundred dollars on the mountain roads, 
in putting them in a much better condition than they had 
been for years. We estimate the damage to the town at 
that time to have been more than eight hundred dollars. 

BRIDGES. 

We have rebuilt three of the largest bridges in the 
town, and have put in new sleepers and re-planked Hill 
bridge, and several others. 

The rebuilding of the river bridge, on the old Depot 
road, was not anticipated, as it had been built less than five 
years, but we found its condition unsafe. 



4 
DAMAGE. 

We have expended for this cause eight hundred and 
fifteen dollars. We had given up building the truss bridge, 
which has been found so unfortutunate a style of bridge 
for this town, several years ago, as we considered it very 
difficult to determine just how long this 'kind of a bridge 
was safe. The whole weight of the bridge depends upon 
each part of the frame, so that the strength of the bridge is 
only that of its weakest stick of timber. With the excep- 
tion of a few feet on the end of the stick that gave way, 
the bridge that went down with Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had 
every appearance of being safe for a number of years, and 
this stick appeared sound upon the outside. 

It is safe to predict, however, that -in the future the 
bridges of this town will be examined with a great deal of 
care by those who have them in charge. 

PAUPERS. 

The sum expended under this head is a little larger 
than last year, though it should be reduced by the amount 
of the sums repaid by the State and town of Wenham. 

Just now nearly all we are supporting are full support 
paupers. The weekly expense is : Charles Morton and 
Barney McHugh, $3 each; M. Ryan and Barbara Goodchild, 
$ 2 each ; two in the Hospital, $3.25 each ; Letty Wheeler, 
f 1.50 ; Tobin children, $3.50 for both, and partial support 
to others, though very little at present. 

It may be possible to find some family to board several 
of these at a less price than we are paying at present. It 
will be wise to find permanent places for the Tobin chil- 
dren. 



It will be well for the town to consider the subject of 
devising some plan that may give us some of the benefits of 
an almshouse, without any great expense. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Our expenditures have been as follows: 

OLD BILLS. 

L. H. Kingsley, printing town reports, etc., $ 40 15 
H. G. Moore, school house repairs and supplies, 100 34 

Harry Wright, services as janitor, 3 25 

N. T. Abellls, cash paid for earth, 2 85 

S. E. Bridgman & Co., books for schools, 17 84 

R. P. Smith, salary Selectman, 50 00 

Charles K. Morton, salary Selectman, 125 00 

Eurotas Morton, salary Selectman, 58 00 

C. B. Dickinson, labor on highways. 16 00 

I. R. Clark, glass for school houses, 2 60 

E. A. Belden, wood for schools, 8 00 

H. G. Moore, cash for sawing wood, 4 00 

O. O. Graves, labor on highway, 3 50 

H. G. Moore, cash for coal, 25 29 

R. B. Abbott, services as janitor, 3 25 

M. H. Burke, painting school houses, 46 02 

James Kelly, services as janitor, 16 00 

Phillip Jubinville, labor on highway, 10 50 

Charles L. Graves, tax on town land, 2 30 

Charles L. Graves, labor on highway, 1 50 

Charles L. Graves, salary Tax Collector, 125 00 

John Carl, sawing wood and janitor, 14 25 

H. Shumway; drawing wood for schools, 1 25 

H. Shumway, drawing wood for poor, 2 50 

H. S. Hubbard, services as Assessor, 11 25 

Wm. C. Dickinson, sendees as Treasurer, 50 00 

J. A. Cutter, labor on bridges, 3 00 



L. S. Crafts, water trough and guide boards, $ 6 00 
Dr. C. L. Knowlton, mecl. attendance on G. 

Murrey, 1880, 16 00 

Dr. C. M. Barton, med. attendance on poor, 

1881, '82, '83, 80 70 

N. T. Abells, labor on highway, 2 00 

E. A. Hubbard, services as School Committee, 10 00 
H. G. Moore, services as School Committee, 50 00 
C. S. Shattuck, sharpening drills, 5 50 

A. M. Peck, services as sexton for poor 3 00 



PAUPERS. 

Mary Wheeler, board of Letty Wheeler, $78 00 

Clifford Russell, board of Patrick Rnssell, 55 00 

Wm. Field, board and clothing Chas. Morton, 159 05 

Thos. Buckley, board of Barney McHugh, 26 00 

J. H. Howard, groceries, M. Ryan, 30 00 

L. S. Bliss, house rent, M. Ryan, 4 50 

Wm. Lyons, meat bill, M. Ryan, 6 60 

Michael Boyle, board, M. Ryan, 52 00 

Cash for clothes, M. Ryan, 14 00 

J. H. Howard, groceries, Mrs. Kennedy, 6 11 

J. H. Howard, goods, Barney McHugh, 6 00 

Thos. Dea, board Barney McHugh, 10 00 

Theodore Baggs, board Barney McHugh, 102 50 

Mrs. Hade, care of Barney McHugh, 3 00 

N. L. Hospital, board of A. M. Richmond, 180 20 

N. L. Hospital, board of Catherine Tobin, 178 13 

City of Northampton, support of J. Proulx, 15 25 
City of Northampton, support of Joseph 

Martin's family, 21 60 
City of Springfield, support Barbara Goodchild, 85 15 

Joseph Smith, cash, Barbara Goodchild, 5 00 

D. J. Wright, groceries, Jane Stone, 45 00 

Mrs. T. Graves, house rent. P. Doppman, 48 00 



$916 84 



Mrs. J. D. Billings, house rent Mrs. Kennedy, $24 00 

Philos Doane, sawing wood for Mrs Kennedy, 1 50 

Smith & Dwight, coaj for Mrs. Kennedy, 7 25 1 

Smith & Dwight, coal for Mrs. Dodge, 7 23 

Cash for Mrs. Dodge, 10 00 
Wm. H* Dickinson, house rent for Mrs. Dodge, 48 00 

Michael Flavin, board of Tobin children, 30 00 

E. M. Martin, clothing Charles Morton, 6 60 

State of Mass., board of Penny Wheeler, 4 43 

A. M. Peck, milk for M. Ryan, 3 87 

Peter Cartier, board John Cartier's family, 12 00 

T. Baggs, lodging tramps, 23 00 

Michael Boyle, lodging tramps, 1 00 

N. P. Gould, lodging tramps, 50 

Charles K. Morton, cash, 3 75 

Dr. C. M. Barton, medical services, 22 00 



$1,336 22 



SCHOOLS. 



Miss Carrie L. Warner, teaching, 

" Eunice J. Morton, •' 

" Julie E. Phelps, " 

" Nellie A. Waite, « 

Mrs. Lizzie A. Kingman, " 

Miss Martha D. Gardner, " 

" Rosella E. Clark, " 



" Gertie A. Strong, 



Henry Carl, services of janitor, 

Charles Abbott, " 

Harry Wight, " 

John J. Burke, " 

James Kelly, " 

Harry Barnes, " 

John Carl, " 

George A. Barton, " 

George Carleton, Jr., " 

Dr. C. M. Barton, cash, " 



$245 00 
245 00 
236 60 
245 00 
238 00 
238 00 
245 00 
65 40 
4 05 

2 50 

3 50 
3 80 
3 75 
7 50 
3 95 
6 30 
2 50 
6 50 



John E. Doane, wood, 


$2 50 




Jacob Carl, drawing wood, 


1 00 




F. G. Bardwell, wood, 


4 50 




Dr. C. M. Barton, cash for wood, 


9 00 




A. L. Strong, wood, 


9 00 




Smith & Dwight, coal, 


139 99 




H. G. Moore, cash for fuel, 


12 13 




" « " " janitors, 


14 50 




VanAntwerpt & Co., dictionaries, 


41 25 








$2,036.22 



TEACHING MUSIC IN SCHOOLS. 
Mrs. D. E. Shattuck, $200 00 



SCHOOL-BOOKS, UNDER NEW LAW. 

S. E. Bridgman & Co., 236 82 



HIGHWAYS. 



Joseph Newman, labor, 



450 32 



HIGHWAYS, (SPECIAL). 



E. S. Strong, labor, 

Peter Saffer, " 

John McGrath, " 

A. L. Strong, " 
George Vollenger, " 

Thos. Nolan, " 

H. Shumway, " 

John McGrath, " 

James Porter, " 
H. S. Porter, 



$19 50 
37 50 

4 50 
1 00 

5 25 

3 75 
46 00 

4 50 

7 00 

8 75 



Win. S. Briggs, tabor, 
F. B. Moore, " 

John MeHugh, Jr., " 
Wm. M. Jones, " _ 

John Boyle, " 

John Steele, 
Frank Newman, " 
John Batzold, " 

George Steele " 

E. S. Strong, " 

John Chancier, u 

Nicholas Powers, " 
John Sheehan, " 

Joseph Klisoner, " 
John McGrath, " 

Lawrence Vollenger " 
H. Shumway, " 

Wm. Miller, " 

George Vollinger, " 
Luther Allis, " 

Emri Merrick, " 

Moses E. Kingsley, " 
J. A. Cutter, " 

Eleazer Cooley, " 
Peter Saffer, 
Michael Boyle, " 

David Payer, " 

C. B. Dickinson, " 
Lawrence Doppman," 
Chas. E. Kingsley, " 
Chas. K. Morton, team, 
Michael O'Dea, labor, 
J. B. Chandler, " 
R. P. Smith, 
John Fitzgibbons," 
Mary L. Hubbard, earth, 



$5 25 


10 


50 


1 


75 


16 


00 


18 


00 


10 


50 


18 


00 


36 


00 


11 


25 


1 


50 


9 


00 


16 


50 


15 


00 


21 


00 


1 


50 


12 


00 


119 


70 


.9 


00 


13 


50 


9 


00 


11 


25 


4 


50 


27 


25 


7 


50 


53 


25 


1 


50 


6 40 


62 


75 


5 


00 


s 


00 


12 


25 


1 


50 


4 


50 


21 


00 


4 


50 


12 


30 



$734 20 



10 



BRIDGES. 

Peter Saffer, labor, $$7 50 

Wells W. Ayer & Co., spikes, 2 75 

F. G. Bardwell, lumber, 19 00 

John E. Doaue, lumber, 28 =o #0 

James Mullins, labor, 8 00 

John Batzold, labor, 7 50 

J. H. Howard, spikes, 3 00 

Alfred Clevy, 12 00 

Peter Saffer, 14 75 

Nicholas Powers, 12 00 

Patrick Boyle, Jr., 3 00 

Michael Boyle, 17 50 

John Holdfedder, 9 00 

C. B. Dickinson, labor, 15 32 

C. B. Dickinson, labor, 20 68 

C. B. Dickinson, lumber, 18 80 

Lawrence Doppman, labor, 7 75 

C. W. White, labor, 47 75 

James Mullins, labor, 4 50 

George Bitner, labor, . 1 25 

Chas. K. Morton, team drawing lumber, 1 00 

P. W. Wilbur, blacksmith work, 2 26 

J. Maxwell, lumber, 112 01 

Eurotas Morton, lumber, 245 48 

James Powers, lumber, 1 00 

Alfred Clevy, labor, 2 00 

W. H. & W. C. Dickinson, tet**? U 133 61 

Wm. Carson, 1 15 

Henry Dwight,, 1 00 

N". T. Abells, plank and posts, 7 33 



STATE AID. 

Mrs. IT. B. Graves, 
Mrs. Anderson, 
Mrs. Covill, 



$48 00 


48 


00 


48 


00 



$767 69 



$144 00 



11 

SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

Mrs. John Leary, cleaning, 

J. H. Howard, supplies, 

W. B. Langdon, mason work, 

Jerre Brown & Co., mason work, 

Joseph Champaigne, repairing roof, 

S. E. Bridgman & Ce., supplies, 

Mrs.' John B. Ryan, cleaning, 

L. A. Cooper, repairing black-boards, 

R. W. & J. R. Sackctt, furniture, 

H. G. Moore, cash for cleaning, 

H. G. Moore, repairs and supplies, 

S. W. Kingsley, repairs, 

E. B. Currier, window shades, 

Dexter Jones, repairs, 

C. W. White, repairs, 

Lee & Day, stove, 

S. W. Kingsley, repairs, 

M. H. Burke, painting, etc., 

Dr. C. M. Barton, repairs and supplies, 

W. L. Smith & Co., settees, 



$4 


25 


12 


74 


• 8 


25 


10 


25 


6 


20 


15 


17 


7 


50 


85 


78 


10 


25 


>> 


00 


13 


40 


14 


10 


10 


90 


9 


75 


1 


00 


11 


25 


1.0 


90 


6 


50 


33 


89 


8 


00 



SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS. 

E. F. Billings, constable, $13 40 

E. F. Billings, assessor, 

H. R. Graves, assessor, 

John T. Fitch, assessor, 

Thomas J. Ryan, constable, 

Wm. D. Billings, 

Wm. D. Billings, registrar of voters, 

S. P. Billings, registrar, 

Joseph S. Wells, registrar, 

Wm. H. Belden, registrar, 

Dr. C. M. Barton, school committee, 

H. G. Moore, " " 

E. A. Hubbard, " " 

D. W. Wells, elector. 



60 


00 


62 


65 


72 


00 


o 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 



$232 58 



$465 05 



12 



MEMORIAL DAY EXPENSES. 



Hatfield Cornet Band, 

W. C. Dickinson, cash for flowers, 

Oliver Ditson & Co., sheet music, 



$25 00 
7 75 
3 00 



DAMAGE. 

Wm. B. Langdon, damage to horse, 
L. M. Johnson and wife, 



$15 00 
800 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

L. P. Dole, $35 00 

Chas. K. Morton, expenses pauper account, 10 06 

Henry Winn, legal services, Smith Charities, 33 33 

Chas. K. Morton, expenses, " " 25 00 

Gazette Printing Co., printing, 7 50 

F. W. Prince, guide-boards, 1 00 

H. Shumway, express, books, 6 00 



$35.75 



LIBRARY. 



J. H. Howard, oil, 

Henry Childs, binding books, 

S. E. Bridgman & Co., books, 

James L. Bowen, book, 

R. M. Woods, " 

L. H. Kingsley, printing, 

E. F. Billings, librarian, 

Wm. P. Allis, wood, 

Levi W. Smith, shelves, 



$1 65 




46 40 




113 54 




2 16 




2 00 




1 00 




25 00 




4 00 




40 00 






3 






$215 75 



$815 00 



13 



W. C. Dickinson, cash, bounties, $52 10 

L. H. Kingsley, printing tax-bills, 
John McHugh, cutting tree for S. H. Dickinson, 
James Ryan, " « " 

S. W. Kingsley, repairing road scraper, 
J. A. Cutter, labor on Cemetery, 
A. M. Peck, " " 

John T. Fitch, stationery and postage, 
Luman S. Crafts, water trough, 
Chas. K. Morton, railroad fare and postage, 
A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 
" " straps for hearse, 

Caleb D. Bardwell, care of Town Hall, 
N. T. Abells, plow and scraper, 
W. D. Billings, obtaining and recording births, 

marriages and deaths, 
W. D. Billings, cash for Registrars' book and 

postage, 
M. H. Burke, repairing blinds Town Hall, 



3 


00 


2 


25 


2 


25 


4 00 


1 


50 


5 


00 


1 


70 


5 


00 


3 


00 


5 


25 


3 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 



23 00 

300 
4 00 



Respectfully submitted, 



$265 94 



CHAS. K. MORTON, ) Selectmen 
EUROTAS MORTON, \ of 
RICHARD P. SMITH, ) Hatfield. 



Hatfield, March 5. 1885. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, for the 
year ending March. 1st, 1885, and have found them 
correct, with proper vouchers on file for all warrants 
drawn, amounting to eight thousand eight hundred seventy- 



I 

14 

one dollars and eighty-eight cents ($8,871.88). Of this 
amount there are orders for two hundred and sixty-six 
dollars and eighty-eight cents ($266.88)*, which have not 
been presented to the Treasurer for payment. 

CHAS. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 

Hatfield, March 4, 1885. 



15 



APPROPRIATIONS FOE 1884. 

Schools, 12,000 

School books, 300 

Poor, 1200 

Bridges, 500 

Highways, 500 

" special repairs, 200 

Town officers, 600 

Contingencies^ 500 

Town debt, , 1,000 

Public Library, 264 

Memorial Day, 50 

Teaching music in Schools, 200 

Enforcing license law, 100 

Interest, 200 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN, 

Lewis S. Dyer, J. A. Cutter, 

Chas. Potter, J. E. Porter, 

Michael Larkin, Thos. M. Dea, 

Chas. E. Hubbard, Daniel W. Wells, 

Chas. D. Bartlett, Chas. L. Cowles, 

W. H. Belden, Geo: C. Maish. 

Alpheus Cowles, Philip Carl, 

Joseph S. Wells, Chas. A. Jones, 

Peter SafTer, Eugene Morton, 

John E. Doane, Chas. L. Warner, 

Patrick Mullaney, Alfred H. Graves, 
Albert Webber, 






AETIOLES IN THE WAEEANT FOE TOWN MEETING, 
MAEOH 16, 1885. 



Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting, 

Art. 2 — To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year, including one person for a member of the 
School Committee for three years. 

Art. 3 — To choose an Elector under the will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4 — To revise and accept the List of Jurors as 
submitted by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5 — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Treas- 
urer and School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7 — To take action in relation to raising money to 
defray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing 
year. 



17 

Art. 8 — To see what method the town will adopt for 
the maintenance and repairs of the highways and bridges 
the ensuing year. 

Art. 9 — To see what action the town will take in 
relation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 10 — To see if the town will raise money to pay 
the outstanding debts of the town. 

Art. 11 — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the public library and choose a committee for the 
same. 

Art. 12 — To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 13 — To hear the report of the several committees 
of the town and act thereon. 

Art. 14. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion to defray the expense of celebrating " Memorial Day." 

Art. 15. — To take action under Chap. 100, Sec. 5 of 
the Public Statutes. The vote must be by sepaiate ballots, 
'" Yes " or " No," in answer to the question, " Shall licenses 
be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town?" 

Art. 16. — To see if the town will pay a bounty for the 
killing of noxious animals and birds. 

Art. 17 — To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
music in the schools. 

Art. 18 — To see what action the town will take in 
relation to a settlement with Joseph S. Newman for repairs 
of highways for the year ending March 1, 1885. 

3 



18 

Art. 19. — To see if the town will locate a highway 
from a point near the house of O. S. Graves in North Hat 
field, easterly to the " old Farms road," so called. 

Art. 20. — To see if the town will erect headstones at 
the graves of soldiers buried in this town, that are at present 
unmarked. 

Art. 21. — To take action in relation to providing ad. 
ditional room for scholars in the West Hatfield district, 
either by building a school house or otherwise. 



Treasurer's Report 



W. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, in account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 



Br, 



To Balance from old account. $248 79 

To cash rec'd from C. L. Graves, Coll. 18560 54 

National Bank Tax, 1,744 83 

Corporation Tax, 382 38 

State Aid, 201 00 

Income of School Fund, 168 47 
Dog Fund, 50 89 

Expenses of contagious 

diseases 48 00 

Support of state paupers 
* temporary, 6 30 

Town of Hadley, for 

ferryboat, 102 50 

Town of Wenham, sup- 
port of Mrs. Dodge, 69 23 
Tuition Northampton 

Scholars, 36 00 

19 



20 



Tuition Whately Scholars, $20 00 
C. S. Shattuck, for laying 

wall, 23 72 

N. T. Abells, over pay 

bridge, ac't., 3 00 

— $11,416 86 



TO CASH RECEIVED FROM LOANS. 

State Treasurer, 4 per cent., $1,500 00 

" " « " « 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 5 per cent., 1,000 00 

1,000 00 
$5,000 00 



u a u 



CASH RECEIVED EROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank 5 per cent., $500 00 

" " " " " " 500 00 



$1,000 00 



$17,665 65 



Or. 



By cash paid Selectmen's orders $8,605 00 

Old orders, 119 21 

Interest on notes, 260 06 

County tax, 1,492 15 

State tax, 1,200 00 



-$11,676 42 



BY CASH PAID ON LOANS. 



State Treasurer, $2,000 00 

" " 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000 00 

_ $4,500 00 



21 



CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, $500 00 

" " " 500 00 

|1,000 00 

Balance in Treasury, $489 23 



$17,665 65 



In account with C. L. Graves, Collector. 

Dr. 

To Cash received, $8,560 54 

Orders of abatement, 28 75 

Discount on Taxes, 114 22 



: — $8,703 51 

Balance in hands of Collector, $1,304 10 



Or. 



$10,007 61 



By Balance from old account, $1,027 36 

Assessors' Warrant, $8,942 53 

Interest on Taxes, 37 72 

$8,980 25 



SUMMARY. 



$10,007 61 



State Treasurer's Note due April 7, 1885, $1,500 00 

" " " " June 1, 1885, 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank Note, 1,000 00 

" " " " 1,000 00 

_ . $5,000 00 

Outstanding Orders, $266 88 

$5,266 88 



22 



Cash in Treasury, 


$489 23 




Uncollected Taxes, 


1,304 10 




Due from State and Military aid, 


144 00 




" " " Paupers, 


45 73 




" City of Northampton, tuition, 


27 00 




" Town of Whately, " 


27 73 


42,037 79 



Balance against the Town, 13,229 09 

WM. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 



I have this day examined the books and vouchers of the 
Treasurer, and have found them correct. 

C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 7, 1885. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



To the Selectmen of the Town of Hatfield : 

Gentlemen : I present to you my annual report. The 
vital statistics are as follows . 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 





NO. 


MALES. 


FEMi 


January, 

February, 

March, 


2 

8 
1 


1 

5 




May, 

June, 


2 
4 


2 
3 




July, 
August, 


3 
6 


2 
3 




September, 
October, 


2 
1 


1 




November, 
December, 


3 
1 


1 
1 


2 



Total, 



33 



19 



14 



PABENTAGE. 



Native born, 18. Foreign born, 9. 
Foreign born father and native born mother, 3. 
" mother " " father, 3. 

23 



24 



Birth rate for five preceding years : 



1879, 


1880, 


1881, 


1882, 


1883, 


35. 


87. 


33. 


24. 


27. 



MARRIAGES, BY MONTHS, 



January, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

August, 

October, 

November, 

Total, 

First marriage of both parties, 
Second " male, first of female, 

" * 6 - female, first of male, 



Age of youngest bridegroom, 
" " bride, 

" " oldest bridegroom, 

" " " bride, 

Under 20 years of age, 
Between 20 and 30 years of age; 
30 and 40 " 

40 and 50 



1 
■ 2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

10 

8 
1 
1 

10 

22 years. 
19 « 
46 " 
45 " 
2 females. 

8 males and 7 females 

1 " 

1 " 1 « 



All of the persons married were native born. 

Number of marriage certificates issued from this office, 10. 

Marriages for the five preceding years : 

1879, 1880, .1881, 1882, 1883, 



13. 



11 



12. 



6. 



17. 



25 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

Total, 
Under 5 years of age, 
Between 5 and 10 years of age, 

" 10 " 20 " 



1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 

22 



1 male, 
1 " 



.20 


u 


30 


30 


u 


40 


40 


u 


50 


50 


C( 


60 


op 


u 


78 


70 


a 


80 


80 


a 


90 



2 females. 


1 


u 


2 


u 


2 


a 


2 


u 


4 


u 


1 


u 



ts 1 " 

8 14 

The oldest persons deceased were one male, 84 years, 8 mos. 
and one female, 84 years, 1 month. 

Death rate for the -five preceding years : 

1879, 1830, 1881, 1882, 1883, 

25. 26. 23. 25. 29. 

Causes of Death, Classified according to the Nomenclature 
Adopted by the State Board of Eegistration s 



Sciatica, 



ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 
CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 



Tabes Mesenterica, 
Phthisis (Consumption Lungs), 
4 



26 



LOCAL DISEASES, 



Disease Liver, 

Abscess Brain, 

Spinal Sclerosis, 

Pueumonia, 

Disease Heart, 

Pleurisy, 

Convulsions, 

Marasmus, 

Atrophy and debility. 

Burns, 

Suicide (poison) 

Suicide (by cars), 



VIOLENT DEATHS. 



STATEMENT OF THE DOQ TAX ACCOUNT. 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, in account with the town of Hat- 
field. 

Dr. 

To cash received from Dec. 1, 1883, to Dec. 1, 1884, 

For Licenses of 40 dogs, at $2 each, $80 00 

Less Clerk's fees, at 20 cents each, 8 00 



172 00 



Cr. 



Dec. 1, 1884, 

By cash paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, $72 00 

The amount paid into the County Treasury on this account 
for the five previous years, was in 

1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, ~ 1883, 

$73.80. $77.40. $59.40. $63.00. $80.40. 

There have been recorded during the year, 24 mortgages of 
personal property, 3 assignments of wages ; all other papers, 3. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



:R/ IE DP O IR, T 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



One change only has been made in teachers since the 
opening of the school year, Mary H. Warner retiring vol- 
untarily from the West Hatfield school. Each school has 
been successful through its three terms. 

The enthusiasm and progressive spirit shown by some of 
our teachers is worthy of commendation. Diligent efforts 
have been made in some of the schools to use Unore 
modern methods of teaching. The changes made have 
given freshness and interest, besides introducing in many 
instances intrinsically better methods. 

The selection of teachers is the most important duty of 
the committee, for on the ability and earnestness of the 
teacher far more than on any other circumstance, depends 
the spirit and excellence of the school. From uur own 
town and from the country towns around us only can we 
hope to retain the best talent the places afford, for any con- 
siderable time. 

Tli9 wages paid for the past year, though small for the 
service we get in some of our schools, have served our pur- 
pose, so far as wages are concerned, in retaining this class of 
teachers. 

27 



28 

An assistant has been employed at West Hatfield, both 
fall and winter terms, and till some bettor means of caring 
for the wants of this school are provided, the assistant 
through the year cannot well be dispensed with. No ade- 
quate relief, however, for the over-crowded condition of this 
school, in our opinion, can be had, except by providing 
another school room and grading the school. 

Appended to this report will be found some observations 
and suggestions, kindly furnished by Mr. E. A. Hubbard, 
in response to an invitation from the chairman of the com- 
mittee. 

MUSIC. 

The music has been in charge of a teacher of experience 
and ability. Below we give her report to us in full : 

" Music as taught from the 4 Tonic-Sol-Fa ' system, in 
the schools of Hatfield, has been attended with the co-oper- 
ation of the teachers and hearty enthusiasm on the part of 
the scholars. 

" Attention has been given to Staff Music during the past 
term, the further advancement of which will necessitate the 
use of ' School Song Books' among the pupils." 

Mrs. D. E. Shatttjck. 



STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EMPLOYED 

&G. 

HILL DISTRICT GRAMMAR. 

Miss Nellie A. Waite, Three Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 35 

Average membership, 27 17-20 

Average attendance, . 23 19-90 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

No. weeks school, , 35 
Amount paid as wages, $245.00. 



29 

HILL DISTRICT PRIMARY. 

Miss Julia E. Phelps, Three Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 49 

Average membership, 38 1-3 

Average attendance, 32 7-9 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 

No. weeks school, 34 
Amount paid as wages, 1236.60. 

CENTER DISTRIBT GRAMMAR. 

Miss Eunice J. Morton, Three Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, * 32 

Average membership, 20 1-6 

Average attendance, 17 17-60 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

No. weeks school, . 35 
Amount paid as wages, $245.00. 

CENTER DISTRICT PRIMARY. 

Miss Carrie L. Warner, Three Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 52 

Average membership, 41 5-9 

Average attendance, 36 1-2 

No. weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, 1245.00. , 

WEST BROOK DISTRICT. 

Miss Martha D. Gardner, Three Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 37 

Average membership, 29 1-10 

Average attendance, 25 5-6 

No. weeks school, 34 
Amount paid as wages, $238. 



30 

WEST FARMS DISTRICT. 

Miss Rosella E. Clark, Three Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 26 

Average membership, 18 2-100 

Average attendance, 16 22-100 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

No. weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, $245.00. 

WEST HATFIELD DISTRICT. 

Miss Mary H. Warner, One Term. Mrs. Lizzie A. Kingman, 

Two Terms. 

No. of scholars enrolled, 56 

Average membership, 51 32-45 

Average attendance, 46 2-9 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

No. weeks school, 34 
Amount paid as wages, $238.00. 

Amount paid assistant as wages, $65.40. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 



Balance unexpended last year, 


$ 9.07 


Appropriated by the town, 


1,800 00 


Appropriated for music. 


200 00 


Received from State Fund, 


168 47 


Received from Dog Fund, 


50 89 


Received from Tuitions, Northampton, 


36 00 


Received from Tuitions, Whately, 


20 00 




40 £>QA 1Q 






Amount expended for teachers, 


$1,758 00 


Wood and coal, 


184 42 


Care of school houses. 


52 55 


Dictionaries, 


41 25 


Music, 


200 00 


Balance unexpended, 


48 21 

<fc9. 984 AR 



31 

No. of children between 5 and 15, 295 

No. of scholars enrolled, 287 

No. of scholars between 5 and 15, 282 

No. of scholars between 8 and 14, 199 

Average attendance in all the schools for the year, 198 

No. of scholars over 15 years of age, 5 

FREE TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

School books and supplies furnished by the town have 
thus far been prudently used. Pupils as a rule have been 
more careful of the town's books than of their own. Teach- 
ers have used special care to guard against loss or waste. 
Accurate accounts have been kept between teachers and the 
supply committee, and between teachers and each scholar. 
If anything is lost the responsible party can be at once 
discovered. Only three books have so far been found miss- 
ing, and these were returned on application by the com- 
mittee to the pupils to whom they were loaned. 

The new law offers obvious advantages, besides the greater 
promptness and fullness with which pupils are supplied with 
books. The plan we have adopted of supplying scholars 
with readers from different series, and exchanging between 
schools, does away with the need of supplemental readers, 
besides overcoming the evil of classes being obliged to read 
from books which they have heard read by the classes in ad- 
vance of them. 

Enlightened teachers, moreover, who assign topics for 
study, instead of the pages of a text-book, and who rate the 
progress of their pupils by the information they gather from 
all sources, rather than from the number of paragraphs they 
can rehearse, will be pleased to find classes in Geography 
and History supplied with a variety of books, instead of as 
now with the same book alike for all. 

The expenditure for books and supplies have been as 
follows : 



32 



Center Grammar, books and supplies, 

enter Primary, " " 

Hill Grammar, " u 

Hill Primary, " " 

West Brook, " 

West Farms, " " 

West Hatfield, " 

Bay State Blanks, 

Stencil Plate, 

Labels, 

Journal, 

Desk, books and paper, 

Books and supplies on hand, 

Total expended, 
Balance unexpended, 





$38 50 




23 95 




18 97 




11 35 




20 90 




21 81 




35 50 


11 95 




1 75 




1 75 




65 


6 10 




4 29 




55 45 




$236 82 




63 18 



$300 00 



The disproportionate amount expended in the Center 
school, arises from the fact that a large class in arithmetic 
has been advanced to the higher book ; also in the Primary 
school two classes in reading have advanced. A similar ex- 
planation might apply to the West Hatfield school. 

The same, appropriation as last year will probably suffice, 
viz., for Schools, $1,800.00 ; for Books and Supplies, 

C. M. BARTON, 
E. A. HUBBARD, 
H. G. MOORE, 



Committee. 



33 



REMARKS OF MR. HUBBARD. 

At the request of the Chairman of the School Committee, 
I have consented to place in his hands, to be appended to 
his report, some observations and suggestions pertaining to 
our public schools. I do this with some reluctance, for my 
acquaintance with the schools is by no means thorough. and 
complete. 

Next in importance to the institutions and interests of re- 
ligion in any town, are the educational interests, and these 
may well receive, as they certainly demand, the careful and 
thoughtful attention of all good citizens. There is much 
truth in the old adage, " As is the teacher so is the school," 
and because of its truth I will speak first of. our teachers' 
They are faithful and earnest, and some of them manifest, 
a genuine enthusiasm. This enthusiasm becomes an inspira- 
tion to their pupils, and the whole school is thoroughly 
alive. Such teachers gladly avail themselves of whatever 
opportunities for their improvement are afforded them by 
teachers' institutes, teachers' conventions, and educational 
publications. They do not hesitate to ask questions, lest 
they betray their own ignorance, but they seek help from 
every quarter, and when a better method than theirs is sug- 
gested, they make it their own, that they may successfully 
incorporate it into their work. 

They seem to feel that one who has ceased to be a learner 
should cease to be a teacher. They have learned that keep- 
ing order, assigning lessons and hearing recitations, is not 
teaching. They maintain order, but it is that order which 
grows spontaneously out of the greater interest and the 
greater desire to know on the part of the pupil, coupled witji 
the better instruction on the part of the teacher. They 
5 



34 

assign lessons, not in that narrow sense of lessons to be com- 
mited to memory from this page to that, or from this article 
to that, but they give out a topic and tell the class where they 
can find something upon that topic in addition to what their 
text-book presents, and encourage them to look it up. They 
hear recitations, but not with text-book in hand, to furnish 
the questions to be asked, and to determine if the answers 
are correct, but to know with what success the pupils have 
pursued their investigations, and to that extent they have the 
power of expression. 

The improvement in some particular branches is worthy 
of special notice. 

And first in the reading. We can remember when the 
child read, or tried to, without any reference to the thought, 
simply naming the words in their proper order. So far as 
any ideas are concerned he might as well have named them 
in the reverse order, have read backwards. We remember 
also that when the child, by the help of the teacher, and by 
hearing others read the story, came to understand it, he was 
required to read it over and over again, till he had lost all 
interest in it, and became utterly careless in his reading 
But this is no longer the case. The good teacher recogni- 
zes the fact that a child cannot read, in any just sense of 
that term, what he does not understand, hence the greater 
effort to make him comprehend the thought, and express 
that thought in his reading. Another thing conspires to the 
same end. The different schools have different series of 
readers, and when one school has read its series till the 
pupils are familiar with it, as the town owns all the books 
they can be shifted from one school to another, and so fresh 
reading matter be supplied. This is an incidental advantage^ 
and by no means a slight one, of the "Free Text Book 
Law." 

Again in the Spelling. The spelling is now done largely 



35 

by writing, and not of words taken from what some one has 
called "nonsense columns," but from sentences. This secui es 
not only correct spelling, for many a boy, and man too for 
that matter, will spell correctly in his oral spelling, but fail 
badly in writing, but also the meaning of the words spelled, 
and the proper use of them. In this way the child necessa_ 
rarily learns to write, and children now at the age of eight 
write better than those of twelve years of age did twenty 
years ago. 

Closely connected with this is a great improvement in 
language. Technical Grammar is studied less in the lower 
grades of school, and the proper use of language, both oral 
and written, is sought after. In some of our schools geogra- 
phy is very well taught in connection with map-drawing, 

Our schools do not suffer greatly from truancy, but they 
- do from absenteeism, especially in the busy ' season. The 
parent who desires the labor of his boy, either for himself or 
for another, when there is a demand for that labor, does not 
rightly appreciate the injury the child sustains by being kept 
out of school. If the planting of his corn, or the setting of 
his tobacco is delayed in the spring, and as a consequence 
the crop is blackened by the frost in the Autumn; if he 
loses a horse, or a cow, and must buy another, or if he is 
sick and must hire help, his loss has a money value easy to 
estimate, but there is no yard-stick by which he can measure; 
there are no scales by which he can weigh, and so estimate 
the loss his boy sustains by his absence from school. He 
may possibly feel that this is a free country, and that these 
are free schools, and that the father has a right to keep his 
own boy at home for the father's convenience or for his ad- 
vantage, but he forgets that he inflicts an injury upon the 
schools, as well as upon his boy, and that if he wishes to 
avail himself of the privileges of our free schools he is bound 
to so avail himself of them that they shall not be less a priv- 



36 

ilege to others. I would bespeak, therefore, as constant an 
attendance as circumstances will permit, and as the best re- 
sults require. 

The schools would be improved by a closer and better 
supervision than the committee are disposed to furnish, and 
I therefore bespeak for them a greater interest and a greater 
watchfulness on the part of the parents and of the people. 
The schools belong to the people, not to the parents. The 
people elect their -School Committee, raise the money and 
pay the taxes, and the parents enjoy the privilege of educa- 
ting their children at the public expense. They would nat- 
urally feel a greater interest in the schools than those who 
have no children there, but this interest does not constitute 
ownership, nor give control. The schools are the people's 
and the people are responsible for them. Allow me then to 
urge my fellow citizens to cherish fondly and guard careful 
ly the public schools ; to make cheerfully all needed appro- 
priations ; and show their interest in them by occasional vis- 
its to them. 

Respectfully, 

E. A. HUBBARD. 



37 



LIST OF BOOKS PURCHASED FOR THE HATFIELD 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, 1884-85. 



Norston's Rest. 

Life of Charles Jewett. 

The Complete Home. 

The Only One. 

A Country Doctor. 

Being a Boy. 

John Bull and his Island. 

Bonnie Leslie. 

The Life of Thurlow Weed, 2 volumes. 

Mignon. 

Maud Percy's Secret. 

Tinkling Cymbals. 

Rutherford. 

St. Elmo. 

Heart of Africa. 

There was Once a Man. 

A Family Flight through Spain. 

Profitable Poultry Keeping. 

Doctor Sevier. 

Her Washington Season. 

Border Beagles and Charlemont. 

Beauchamp. 

Guy Rivers and Richard Hurdis. 

Kitty's Conquest. 

Where the Battle was Fought. 

Pioneers of the Western Reserve. 

History of the 37th Massachusetts Regiment. 

Life and Labor in the Far West. 



88 



A Young Girl's Wooing. 

Pretty Lucy Merwin. 

Square and Compasses. 

Ned in the Woods. 

Ned on the River. 

Old Caravan Days. 

Farnell's Folly. 

Out of the Wreck. 

The Yenasee. 

Woodcraft. 

The Foragers. 

The Successful Merchant. 

Stephen Archer. 

Life and Times of Fred Douglass. 

Hans Brinker. 

On a Mexican Mustang through Texas. 

Dr. Grattan. 

The Boys of '61. 

How the Farm Pays. 

Harper's Magazine, 1884, 2 volumes. 

Atlantic Magazine, 1884, 2 volumes. 

Century Magazine, 1884, 2 volumes. 

Acts of the Anti-Slavery Apostles. 

Life at Puget Sound. 

The Liquor Problem. 

Gustavus Adolphus. 

The Merchant Vessel. 

Man of War Life. 

Wonders of the Railway. 

Ramona. 

The Red Wall Flower. 

The Making of a Man. 

An Appeal to Ceasar. 

Madam. 

Protection in the United States. 



! 



39 



The Building of a Nation. 

The Mystery of the Locks. 

In War Times. 

Noble Blood. 

At the World's Mercy. 

In the Tennessee Mountain. 

End of a Coil. 

Nobody. 

Ziz-zag Journeys in Acadia. 

Farm and Garden Topics. 

Donald and Dorothy. 

The Academy Boys. 

Life of Chinese Gordon. 

Self Effort. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS, 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



For the Year Ending March 1, 1 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. : 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY JOURNAL PRINT. 

1886. 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING 
TO BE HELD MARCH 15, 1886. 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary town officers for the ensuing 
year, including one person for a member of the School Committee 
for three years. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the will of the late Oli- 
ver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of jurors as submitted 
by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Treasurer and 
School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on Town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to defray 
the necessary expenses of the Town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the Town will adopt for the 
maintenance and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the Town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the Town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the Town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation for 
the public library, and choose a committee for the same. 



Art. 12. — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor for the ensuing year. 

Art. 18. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation to 
defray the expenses of celebrating " Memorial Day." 

Art. 14. — To take action under Chapter 100, Section 5, of the 
Public Statues. The vote must be by separate ballots, yes, or no, 
in answer to the question, " Shall licenses be granted for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors in this Town ?" 

Art. 15. — To see if the Town will pay a bounty for the killing 
of noxious animals and birds. 

Art. 16. — To see if the Town will employ a teacher of music 
in the schools. 

Art. 17. — To see what action the Town will take in relation to 
the railroad crossings in the Town, and to act on all matters be- 
tween the Town and the railroads running through the Town. 

Art. 18. — To see if the Town will take action in relation to the 
cemeteries in the Town. 

Art. 19. — To see if the Town will re-imburse E. A. Hubbard 
for any portion of the expense incurred by him in laying a drain 
in the highway near his house. 






Selectmen's Report. 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hatfield : 

In accordance with directions given by the Town, the Assess- 
ors apportioned the money appropriated for the ordinary repairs 
of highways and bridges among the several highway districts. 
The South Center district was given $150, the 'North Center, 
$100, the Hill $125, West Hatfield $90, West Farms $90, and 
West Brook $100, leaving $95 to be re-distributed. The survey- 
ors in the districts where the appropriations have been over-run, 
notified the Selectmen when the amount of their appropriations 
were expended, as provided by law, and after that time made 
only the repairs that public safety demanded. 

We at last have solved the problem of draining Main street. 
The unusual rainfall of this season has thoroughly tested the 
Surveyor's work in that district. 

We have found that in the repairs of bridges we must be 
guided to some extent, by the actual needs of expenditure in that 
department, rather than by the amount appropriated. We have 
built a large, and quite expensive bridge at Brook Hollow, rebuilt 
Mill bridge, practically making it a new bridge ; another across 
Mill river beyond the saw-mill at West Hatfield, and made quite 
extensive repairs on others. It hardly seems as if so much 
money would be needed in this department the coming year. 

We have exceeded the appropriation for paupers by $157. 18. 
By a careful examination of the returns from the cities and towns 



of the State, we find that we are boarding our full support pau 
pers at a rate a little lower than the average. We have paid 
quite a sum to other towns for persons living in those towns, but 
settled in Hatfield ; but this only after careful examination 

As no Board of Health has been chosen in this Town, the 
Selectmen have acted in that capacity as required by law. We 
have in our experience in efforts for the suppression of contagious 
diseases, found that it is desirable that the inhabitants of the 
Town should be more familiar with the laws on the subject. 

We append Sec. 1, Chap. 98, of the Acts of 1884. 

Sec. 1. — When a householder knows that a person within his 
family is sick of small pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, or any other 
disease dangerous to the public health, he shall immediately give no- 
tice to the Selectmen or Board of Health of the town in which 
he dwells, and upon the death, recovery, or removal of such per- 
son, the rooms occupied and the articles used by him shall be 
disinfected by such householder in a manner approved by the 
Board of Health Any person neglecting or refusing to comply 
with either of the above provisions, shall forfeit a sum not ex- 
ceeding one hundred dollars. 



OLD BILLS. 

Leander Cooley, labor on highways, $ 11 75 

E. A. Briggs, labor on highways, # 1 50 

Philip Carl, labor on highways, 4 75 

L. S. Crafts, labor on highways, 9 90 

C. B. Dickinson, labor on highways, 5 00 

H. Shumway, labor on highways, 11 75 

Eurotas Morton, 4 25 

E. W. Field, 4 65 

Nelson Allair, labor on bridges, 6 00 

John Sheehan, labor on bridges. 4 50 

John Steele, labor on bridges, 4 00 

Joseph S. Newman, balance labor on highways 

and bridges, 50 00 

Joseph S. Newman, repairs, bridges of N". H. & 

N. Co. R. R., 22 50 

Mrs. Lucy L. Morton, lumber for bridges, 4 39 

Eurotas Morton, lumber for bridges, 9 40 

Oscar Belden, wood for schools, 6 00 

Joseph Vollenger, services as janitor, 3 50 

Wm, H. Dickinson, services as R. R. committee, 25 00 
Thaddeus Graves services as R. R. committee, 25 00 
Thaddeus Graves, legal services, case Rosamond 

Bardwell, 5 00 

Thaddeus Graves, wood for library, 6 00 

Smith & Dwight, coal for Mrs. Kennedy, 6 93 

John E. Doane, wood for Mrs. Kennedy, 2 25 

Thos. M. Dea, board of Barney McHugh, 29 00 

Eurotas Morton, lodging tramp, 1 00 



I 273 72 



PAUPERS. 

Mary Wheeler, board of Letty Wheeler, 78 00 

N". L. Hospital, board of Catherine Tobin, 181 93 

K L. Hospital, board of A. M. Richmond, 184 77 

Michael Flavin, board of Tobin children, 180 00 

Wm, W. Field, board of Charles Morton, 158 00 



Theodore Baggs, board of Barney McHugh, $92 00 
John Goodchild, board of Barbara Goodchild, 50 75 
John Goodchild, cash for burial of Barbara 

Goodchild, • 20 00 

Betsey Goodchild, support of Barbara Good- 
child, 3 00 
City of Springfield, support of Barbara Good- 
child, 
Michael Boyle, board of M. Ryan, 
John Karin, board of M. Ryan, 
Mary Waite, cash for support, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, cash, house rent, Mary 

Waite, 
Mrs. T. Graves, house rent, P. Doppman, 
State of Mass., board of Penny Wheeler, 
City of Boston, support of James E. Messer, 
City of Northampton, support of Mrs. Joseph 

Martin's child, 20 90 

City of Northampton, burial of Geo. Vollinger's 

child, 
Clifford Russell, board of Patrick Russell, 
E. M. Martin, clothes for Charles Morton, 
J. H. Howard, shoes for Barney McHugh, 
Theodore Baggs, lodging tramps, 
Martin Lyons, lodging tramps., 
Clark & Parsons, medicine, 
Chas. K. Morton, cash, 



47 


96 


72 


00 


16 


00 


20 


00 


24 


00 


56 


00 


12 


86 


25 


61 



To be reimbursed by state and town of Wenham : 
Mrs. Alvira M. Dodge, cash for support, 
Smith & Dwight, coal, 
D. A. Horton, coal, 
Chas. K. Morton, drawing coal, 
John E. Doane, wood, 
Wm. H. Dickinson, house rent, 



6 


50 




61 


00 




4 55 




1 


50 




37 


00 




1 


00 

85 




1 


00 


1 1,357 18 


, 




3nn3 
30 


00 




14 


74 




7 


16 




1 


50 




22 


50 




24 


00 





J. H. Howard, groceries, Mrs. W. Stone, $21 00 

W. J. Lyons, butcher's meat, 1 00 



$ 99 90 



$22 00 





SCHOOLS. 




Miss Carrie L. Warner, teaching, 


$2b2 O'O 


" Eunice J. Morton, 


a 


154 00 


" Nellie A. Waite, 


iC 


:252 00 


" Hattie L. Haven, 


a 


245 70 


" Martha D. Gardner, 


« 


245 00 


" Carrie C. Cutter, 


a 


216 00 


*' Annie E. Bourne, 


u 


175 00 


" Minnie A. Bourne, 


a 


163 85 


Mrs. Lizzie Kingman, 


a 


77 00 


Miss Gertrude Strong, 


u 


33 00 


" Kate Wells, 


u 


21 00 


" Lilian A. Brown, 


u 


65 80 


George Porter, services as 


janitor, 


21 00 


Eddie Breor, " 


u 


10 00 


Minnie Smith, " 


a 


10 00 


Carrie L. Smith, " 


a 


10" 00 


Barney McHugh, " 


a 


4 00 


Mary Bolize, " 


a 


2 50 


Archie P. Graves, " 


a 


4 35 


Harry Barnes, " 


a 


3 00 


Eugene S. Strong, " 


a 


3 20 


Willie Abbott, " 


a 


1 25 


Lawrence Powers, " 


u 


2 00 


Eugene Jubenville, " 


u 


3 50 


Smith & Dwight, coal, 




79 07 


E. M. Martin, coal, 




35 38 


Dr. C. M. Barton, cash foi 


• drawing coal, 


5 04 


H. G. Moore, cash for fuel 


» 


8 35 


A. L. Strong, wood, 




3 00 


Lawrence Powers, sawing 


wood, 


2 00 


Frank A. Cutter, sawing wood, 


2 50 


Geo. E. Barton, " 


u 


2 50 


Geo. W. Carleton, services as janitor, 


2 00 



$2,114 94 



10 
MUSIC IN SCHOOLS, 



Mrs. D. E. Shattuck, teachings 


$162 00 


S. E. Bridgman & Co., books y 


36 16 


H. G. Moore, cash for books, 


1 00 


SCHOOL BOOKS, 




S. E. Brldgman & Co.,, 


$298 66 


D. Appleton & Co,, 


6 34 


HIGHWAYS. 




SOUTH CENTER DISTRICT 




D. W. Wells, surveyor,. 


$31 42 


John Kiley, labor, 


15 30 


Sanford S. Sanderson,, 


1 25 


Nicholas Powers,, 


1 87 


James Mullins, 


2 50 


Robert McGrath, 


1 8T 


D. W. Wells, men and team.. 


11 60 


Thomas Nolan, 


1 87 


Jacob Carl, 


9 03 


Chas. K. Morton, 


14 81 


Frederick Pease, 


9 37 


Patrick Boyle, 


4 25 


D. P. Morton, 


9 75 


E. S. Warner, 


5 68 


Mrs. Nancy D. Billings, 


5 75 


John Vollenger, 


4 75 


F. H.Bardwell, 


9 62 


John Steele, 


1 25 


John Powers, 


2 50 


J. S.Wells, 


7 99 


John McHugh, 


3 11 


Michael O'Dea, 


1 25 


Henry Steingline, 


2 50 



199 16 



$ 300 0© 



11 



Edwin Burt, 

€. L. & R. H. Cowles, 

David Billings, 

¥m. P. Allis, labor and lumber, 

Mark Kiley, 

Adam Doppman, 

8. G. Hubbard, 

Roswell Billings, 

Elisha Hubbard, labor and earth, 



NORTH CEJSTTER DISTRICT, 



14 50 


9 *0 


9 00 


5 05 


3 75 


1 25 


7 00 


1 25 


5 75 



I 206 29 



Frederick Carl surveyor, 






Edwin Brainard, 




$3 25 


John O'Neil, 




1 25 


John B. Ryan, 




2 25 


John Karin, 




1 25 


Wm. P. Allis, labor and 


lumber, 


6 90 


Marble Hamill, 




4 00 


Geo. W. Smith, 




1 62 


James Breor, 




10 60 


A. M. Peck, 




1 02 


Edward Proulx, 




9 00 


Levi L. Pease, 




8 25 


Wm. H. Dickinson, 




19 50 




HILL DISTRICT, 




Patrick Mullanny, surveyor, 


$78 89 


Patrick Mullanny, labor with horse, 


11 45 


John McGrath, labor, 




12 00 


Anthony Allair, 




1 87 


David Fitzgerald, 




2 00 


Joseph Baker, 




7 50 


James Porter, 




12 00 


E. S. Warner, 




4 50 


Michael Larkin, 




9 99 



$ 69 79 



12 



Wm. M. Jones, 

H. Shumway, 

Robert McGrath, 

Alfred Breor, 

Henry Goodchild, 

Moses Kingsley, 

L. S. Dyer, 

Thaddeus Graves, labor and earth, 

J. D. Porter, 

Thos. Whalen, 

A. H. Graves, 

Samuel P. Billings,, 

John Gendron, 

Moses E. Warner,, 

Nelson Allair, 

Oh as. E. Kingsley y 

John T. Fitch, 

M. N. Hubbard, 



WEST HATFIELD DISTRICT. 



Peter Saffer, surveyor, 
E. S. Strong, 
George Dennis, 
Frank Newman, 
Philip Carl, 
Joseph S. Newman, 
Henry Dwight, 
Lawrence Doppman, 
J. A. Cutter, 



$18 80 

27 00 

1 87 

9 75 

1 50 

5 52 

3 00 

19 50 

12 10 

1 87 

22 24 



52 

22 



13 62 

2 25 

63 

9 00 

1 25 



$50 31 


9 


76 


1 


25 


3 


13 


1 


63 


17 


62 


3 


00 


1 


15 


3 


75 



$ 297 84 



$ 91 69 



WEST FARMS DISTRICT. 



Albert H. Marsh, surveyor, 
Leander Cooley, labor, 
Belden Brothers, 
Eurotas Morton, 
L. E, Bartlett, 



$22 50 
15 62 

5 50 

6 05 
1 62 



13 



David Powers, $10 61 

O. S. Graves, 2 25 

H. G. Moore, 8 12 

H. H. Field, 8 88 

A. S. Jones & Sons, 12 65 

E. F. Cooley, 4 50 

C. D. Bartlett, 4 25 

C. W. Marsh, 3 25 



WEST BROOK DISTRICT. 

Henry R. Graves, surveyor, 
L. S. Crafts, labor, 
W. S. Briggs, 
Dwight Morton, 
Michael Clancy, 
Horace Waite, 
C. W. Wolfram, 
John Fitzgibbons, 
Morris Fitzgibbons, 
George Englehart, 



BRIDGES. 

George Vollinger, $1 50 

Patrick Boyle, Jr., 3 25 

George Saffer, 2 75 

John Maxwell, lumber, 326 14 

James Mullins, labor, 19 62 

Lawrence Yollenger, 2 59 

J. H. Howard, spikes, 5 07 

Patrick Boyle, 2 50 

Mrs. Lucy L. Morton, lumber, 5 40 

Patrick Mullanny, 9 00 

Fred Clevy, 10 50 

Nicholas Powers, 2 50 

C. W. White, 17 00 

B. P. Dole, 5 00 



29 34 


10 60 


4 27 


1 88 


3.25 


2 33 


4 50 


4 50 


1 25 


1 25 



I 105 75 



$ 63 17 



14 



Joseph Baker, 


$5 75 


Champion B. Dickinson, lumber, 


63 12 


George Dennis, 


3 75 


John Sheehan, 


11 25 


Peter Statter, 


4 00 


P. Doppman, 


8 00 


Joseph Statter, 


3 90 


John Boyle, 


2 07 


James Porter, 


6 50 


S. W. Kingsley, 


3 10 


Chas. K. Morton, labor and lumber, 


27 50 


Wm. M. Jones, labor, 


9 00 


Joseph S. Newman, labor, 


15 28 


Joseph S. Newman, stone, 


2 00 


George Bitner, labor, 


2 25 


John Kiley, " 


10 00 


H. Shumway, drawing plank} 


2 00 


John E. Doane, labor and lumber, 


2 50 


F. G. Bardwell, " 


12 49 


Michael O'Dea, " 


2 25 


John Chandler, " 


4 38 


Peter Saffer, 


28 25 


Edmund Powers, " 


1 25 


Chas. Carson, " 


1 56 


N. Day & Bros., lumber, 


36 20 


F. W. Prince, labor, 


3 00 


E. M. Martin, spikes, 


60 


D. J. Wright, " 


70 


Eurotas Morton, labor and lumber, 


25 71 


S. G. Hubbard, « 


4 50 


E. S. Strong, " 


4 88 


SPECIAL REPAIRS, 


HIGHWAYS. 


Samuel Snell, drain pipe, 


45 50 


Chas. E. Clapp, grate for drain, 


2 25 


J. A. Sullivan, cement, 


1 50 


Michael O'Dea, labor. 


3 75 



$ 720 57 



15 



John Kiley, labor, 

Conn. River R. R. freight on drain pipe, 

John Sheehan, labor, 

Mary L. Hubbard, earth, 

George C. Marsh, labor and earth, 

Belden Bros., 

Michael Larkin, 

Wells W. Ayer & Co., powder and fuse, 

Eurotas Morton, 



$5 


75 


3 


85 


5 


00 


12 


00 


10 


00 


13 


50 


1 


00 


1 


70 


3 


37 



$ 109 17 



HIGHWAYS, WEST HATFIELD, (special repairs). 



Peter Saffer, labor, 


$14 38 


Lawrence Yollenger, 


2 50 


John Steele, 


2 50 


John Batzold, 


3 13 


A. L. Strong, 


6 50 


Frank Newman, 


2 88 


William Carson, 


1 50 


Peter Statter, 


3 00 


Charles Carson, • 


2 50 


John Vollenger, 


6 50 


Philip Carl, 


10 00 


John Chandler, 


4 00 


E. S. Strong, 


3 25 


Joseph Newman, 


12 25 


John Steingline, 


2 50 


Edmund Powers, 


9 00 


Lawrence Doppman, 


6 50 




t 0° so 


STATE AID. 


qp «7^i OV 


Mrs. U. B. Graves, 


$12 00 


Mrs. Minerva Anderson, 


52 00 


Mrs. Elizabeth Covill, 


48 00 




— $ 112 00 



16 
SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS, WEST HATFIELD. 



C. N. Harlow & Co., 


$395 


58 


0. D. Case & Co., seats, 


122 


31 


A. L. Strong, cash for freight, 


3 


46 


SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS 


AND SUPPLIES. 


J. H. Howard supplies, 


$10 


99 


Mrs. John Ryan, cleaning, 


15 


00 


D. Appleton & Co., supplies, 


5 


40 


Milton Bradley Co., 


2 


70 


J. W. Kingsley, repairs, 


6 


50 


L. J. Powers, " 


26 


04 


Wm. Daugherty, repairs, 


4 


40 


John E. Doane, repairs, 


i 


00 


C. N. Harlow & Co., blackboards, 


12 


69 


E. M. Martin, supplies, 




15 


John Springer, " 


2 


54 


H. G. Moore, cash for supplies, 


2 


45 


Dr. C. M. Barton, supplies, 


21 


49 


W. L. Smith & Co., desk, 


12 


00 


J. R. & R. W. Sackett, chairs, 


12 


60 


Mrs. T. Porter, cleaning, 


1 


00 

$ 136 95 



SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS. 

E. F. Billings, serving warrants etc., $12 00 

E. F. Billings, Assessor, 61 23 

Henry R. Graves, 59 37 

John T. Fitch, 59 13 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, 50 00 

W. D. Billings, Registrar of voters, 25 00 

Samuel P. Billings, Registrar of voters, 12 50 

Dr. C. M. Barton, School Committee, 50 00 

D. W. Wells, Elector, 10 00 

Wm. Barnes, Constable, 5 00 



17 



Chas.K. Morton, Selectman 1884, 1125 00 

Eurotas Morton, " " 

R. P. Smith, 

William C. Dickinson, Treasurer, 

Charles L Graves, Tax Collector, 

LIBRARY. 

E. F. Billings, salary as librarian and cash, 
E. F. Billings, cash for cleaning, 
Henry Childs, binding books, 
W. P. Allis, drawing wood, 
Philos Doane, sawing wood, 
R. M. Woods, cash for books, 



58 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


150 


00 


125 


10 


2 


25 


38 


00 


1 


00 




50 


7 


50 



$ 777 23 



$ 7-4 35 



MEMORIAL DAY EXPENSES. 

D. W. Wells, for committee, $50 00 

MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS. 

Wade, Warner & Co., printing town reports and 

license ballots, $43 50 

Chas K. Morton, expense to Boston, 9 00 

A. M. Peck, labor in cemetery, 12 75 

Gazette Printing Co., order book, 3 79 

S. W. Kingsley, repairs road scraper, 1 25 

L. S. Crafts, care of water trough, 5 00 

W. D. Billings, cash for blank books, 6 50 

H. Shumway, express on books, 3 30 

Wm. Daugherty, painting guide boards, 3 50 

R. B. Davis & Son, trimming hearse, 43 14 

A. M. Peck, returning deaths, 5 50 

A. M. Peck, taking hearse to Northampton, 1 00 

W. R. Kinsman, headstones for soldiers' graves, 30 00 

E. C. Davis, one-half cost surveying Whately 

line and record, 20 00 

E. C. Davis, taking level Main street, 5 00 



18 



E. C. Davis, one-half cost re-setting stone North- 
ampton line, $2 50 
S. E. Bridgman & Co., blank books and station- 
ery 
W. G. Bassett, legal services and consultation, 
W. G. Bassett, cash for term fees Everett case, 
Morris Fitzgibbons, building water trough, 
N. T. Abells, mowing cemetery West Hatfield, 
Town of Whately, one-half cost line stone, 
Charles K. Morton, labor and expenses running 

town line, 
Chas. K. Morton, postage, etc., 
Wm. D. Billings, obtaining, copying and record- 
ing births, marriage and deaths, 
Win. D. Billings, postage and stationery, 
E. K. Billings, expenses to Boston to the hearing 

before the Board of Appeal in tax case, 12 00 
W. C. Dickinson, cash for bounties, 47 40 






©©■ 


11 


00 


15 


00 


5 


oo 


1 


00 


4 


75 


4 37 


3 


25 


23 


35 


1 


38 



$ 330 10 



Respectfully Submitted, 



CHAS. K. MORTON, 
EUROTAS MORTON, 
RICHARD P. SMITH, 



Selectmen 

of 

Hatfield. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen for the year 
ending March 1st, 1886, and have found them correct, with proper 
vouchers on file for all warrants drawn amounting to eight thou- 
sand one hundred twenty-five dollars and four cents ($8,125.04), 
Of this amount there are orders for ten hundred eighty-five dol- 
lars and seventy-nine cents (11085.79), which have not been pre- 
sented to the Treasurer for payment. 

C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 6, 1886. 



19 

Appropriations for 1885. 



Highways and Bridges, 


$750 


oo 


Highways and bridges, special repairs, 


500 


00 


Highways repairs road Pantry, 


100 


00 


Repairs School-house Pantry, 


500 


00 


Enforcement license law, 


100 


00 


Schools, 


1,950 


00 


School Books, 


300 


00 


Schools, Music, 


225 


00 


Poor, 


1,200 


00 


Contingencies, 


500 


00 


Town Officers, 


900 


00 


Town Debt, 


1,000 


00 


Memorial Day, 


50 


00 


Public Library, 


200 


00 


Interest, 


200 


00 


Headstones for soldiers' graves, 


50 


00 

& 8 ^9^ 00 






np O^OZiO \J\J 



Jury List Reported by the Selectmen. 

MICHAEL LARKIN, J. E. PORTER, 

CHAS. E. HUBBARD, THOS. M. DEA, 

ALPHEUS COWLES, DANIEL W. WELLS, 

JOSEPH S. WELLS, CHAS. L. COWLES, 

PETER SAFFER, PHILIP CARL, 

JOHN E. DOANE, EUGENE I. MORTON, 

PATRICK MULLANNY, CHARLES L. WARNER, 
ALBERT H. WEBBER. 



Treasurer's Report. 



Wm. 0. Dickinson, Treasurer, in Account with the Town 

of Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account, 1489 23 

To cash rec'd from C. L. Graves, collector, |1,293 49 

A.L. Strong, » 8,622 18 

National Bank Tax, 1,385 85 

Corporation Tax, 322 70 

Income of School Fund, 216 80 

State Aid, 152 00 

Dog Fund, 77 32 

Town of Hadley, for ferry 

boat, 41 25 

City of Northampton, 

tuition, 27 00 

Support of state paupers, 

temporary, 20 00 
J. T. Fitch, overpay as As- 
sessor, 12 00 
Rent of Town Hall. 10 00 
Support of State paupers, 7 80 



22 

D. W. Wells, from memorial 
day appropriation, $6 50 

County 1-2 cost line stone, 3 75 

A. M. Peck, sale of burial 

lots, 1 00 

$12,199 64 

TO CASH RECEIVED FROM LOANS. 

State Treasurer, 3 7-8 per cent., $1,500 00 

3 3-4 " " 1,500 00 

« « 4 1-4 " " 1,000 00 

$ 4,000 00 

CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire. Savings Bank, 4 1-2 per cent., 500 00 



Cr. 


$17,188 87 


By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 


$7,039 25 


Old orders, 1884-85, 


266 88 


" « 1883-84, 


50 00 


County Tax, 


1,492 15 


State Tax, 


900 00 


Interest on notes, 


272 31 


Insurance, 


200 00 




$10,220 59 



BY CASH PAID ON LOANS. 

State Treasurer, $1,500 00 

« " 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000 00 

« " " 1,000 00 

$5,000 00 

CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 500 00 

Balance in Treasury, $1,468 28 

$17,188 87 



23 

In account with C. L. Graves, Collector. 
Dr. 

To Cash received, $1,293 49 

Order of abatement, 44 57 

$ 1,338 06 

Or. 
By Balance from old account, $1,304 10 

Interest on Taxes, 33 96 

- — $ 1,338 06 



In account with A. L. Strong, Collector. 

Dr. 

To Cash received, $8,622 18 

Discount on Taxes, 236 31 

Orders of abatement, 42 40 

$ 8,900 89 

Balance uncollected Taxes, 496 96 



$9,397 85 



Or. 

By Assessors' Warrant, $9,378 36 

Interest on Taxes, 19 49 

$9,397 85 

SUMMARY. 

State Treasurer's Note, due April 7, 1886, $1,500 00 

" June 1, 1886, 1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank Note, 1,000 00 

$ 4000 00 

Outstanding Orders, 1,085 79 



$5,085 79 
Cash in Treasury, $1,468 28 

Uncollected Taxes, 496 96 



24 

Due from State and military aid, $112 00 

City of Northampton, Smith Char- 
ties tax, 123 53 
Town of Wenham, support of Mrs. 

Dodge, 90 90 

Tuition Northampton and Whately 

scholars, 36 00 

$ 2,327 67 



Balance against the Town, $2,758 12 

WM. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 

I have this day examined the books and vouchers of the 
Treasurer, and found them correct. 

C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 6, 1886. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



■To the Selectmen of the Town "of Hatfield: 

Gentlemen : — Herewith I present to you my annual report. 
The vital statistics are as follows : . 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. " 



January, 

February, 

March, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Total, 



NO. 

2 
6 
4 
4 
2 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
1 

32 



MALES. 
4 

2 
3 
1 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 



FEMALES 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

2 
2 



17 



15 



PARENTAGE. 

Native born, 20 ; Foreign born, 6. Foreign born father and 
native born mother, 3. Foreign born mother and native born 
father, 3. 



26 

Birth rate for five previous years : 

1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 

87 33 24 27 33 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 



January, 
April, 

May, 
June, 


1 

2 
1 
1 


September, 
October, 


1 

2 


November, 


1 



Total, 

First marriage of both parties, 
Second marriage of both parties, 
Third marriage of male, first of female, 



Age youngest bridegroom, 
Age oldest bridegroom, 
Age youngest bride, 
Age oldest bride, 







2 






1 






9 


22 


years. 


74 


u 




19 


a 




62 


u 





Of the whole number married there were : 
Under 20 years of age, 1 female. 

Between 20 and 30 years of age, 4 males, 4 females. 

30 and 40 " " 2 " 1 " 

50 and 60 " " 1 " 2 « 

60 and 70 . 2 " 1 " 

Of the persons married, 

6 couples were native born 

1 couple were foreign born. 

1 couple male foreign born, female native, 

1 couple male native born, female foreign 

No. of marriage certificates issued from this office, 8. 



27 

Marriages for the five previous years : 

1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 

11 12 6 17 10 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Total, 

Under 5 years of age, 
Between 5 and 10 years of age, 



" 20 < 


' 30 


" 30 < 


' 40 


" 40 < 


< 50 


" 50 < 


< 60 


« 60 < 


< 70 


" 70 < 


< 80 


« '80 < 


< 90 



Males. 
5 
1 



24 

Females. 
4 

1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 



13 11 

The oldest persons deceased were one male, 86 years, and 
one female 89 years old. 

Of the number deceased, 16 were native, and 8 foreign born. 
Death rate for the five previous years : 

1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 

26 23 25 29 22 



28 

Causes of death classified according to the nomenclature 
adopted by the State Board of Registration: 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Typhoid Fever, 1 

Intermittent Fever, 1 

Metria, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Phthisis, (Consumption of Lungs), 4 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Peritonitis, 1 

Disease of Heart, 1 

Disease of Spleen, 1 

Pneumonia, 2 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 

Atrophy and Debility, 1 

Malformation, 1 

Infantile Debility, 3 

Stillborn, 2 

Old Age, 3 

VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Drowning, 1 

Suicide, (Drowning), 1 

24 



STATEMENT OF THE DOG TAX ACCOUNT. 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, in account w T ith the Town of 
Hatfield : 

Dr. 

To cash received from Dec 1, 1884, to Dec. 
1, 1885, for license of 46 dogs, (males) 
at $2 each, $92 00 



$102 00 


9 60 


192 40 


$92 40 



29 

To cash received for license of 2 clogs, (fe- 
males) at $5 each, $10 00 



Less Clerk's fees, 48 at 20 cents each, 

Or. 
By cash paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, 

Amount paid the County Treasurer on this account for the 
five preceding years : 

1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 

$77.40. $59.40. $63.00. $80.40. $72.00. 

There have been recorded in the Town Clerk's offi.ce during 
the year, forty mortgages of personal property, 5 assignments of 
wages ; all other papers 2. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Fellow Citizens : 

The schools have been maintained thirty-six weeks the last 
year at an aggregate cost, including the expense for music and 
books, of about $2650. 

The number of persons in town May 1, 1885, between the 
ages of five and fifteen years was 262, between the ages of eight 
and fourteen years was 167. The number of pupils in the schools 
some part of the year, that is, the entire membership, was 268. 
The average membership was 211, and the average attendance 
was 182. Comparing the enumeration (262), with the entire 
membership, (268), the numbers are nearly equal, that is, about 
as many persons were in our schools at least for one day, as were 
found in the enumeration, May 1. Comparing the average mem- 
bership (211) with the entire membership (263) and it appears 
that quite a large number of pupils attend school only a part of 
the year. Comparing the average attendance, (182), with the av- 
erage membership (211), and a great loss appears from the occa- 
sional absences, the irregular attendance, but this comparison by 
no means expresses the loss from this source. 

Every teacher understands the injury inflicted upon a school 
by this occasional absence. When the absentee returns, if he is 



32 

to retain his place in his class, extra labor must be bestowed up- 
on him, and the class must wait for him till he has recovered his 
lost ground, or advance more slowly, and lose their time little by 
little. The subjects are so related oftentimes that his lack of 
knowledge of one makes it impossible for him to comprehend 
the next. The experience of years has suggested to teachers no 
way of overcoming the evil of absenteeism. In this town they 
have been unable to secure more regular attendance, and out of 
school study, or extra work in school has not succeeded in fitting 
their absentees to proceed with their classes. Indeed, the high 
pressure under which our schools are now run, makes it more and 
more difficult to recover the ground lost. To assist those pupils, 
who, from absence at the beginning of the term, or from irregu- 
lar attendance, or from frequent dismissals before the close of the 
sessions, or those who from any cause, need more time and 
assistance from the teachers, in order that they may not lose their 
places in their classes, the committee propose, for the coming 
spring term, to dismiss regular attendants at 3 p. m., instead of 4 
as now, and give the hour from 3 to 4 to those who specially need 
help. Regular school hours will be as now from 9 to 12, and 
from 1 to 4. Any or all classes will be expected to remain till 4 
at the discretion of the teachers. All absentees will attend the 
hour from 3 to 4 in all cases, until they are prepared to go on 
profitably with their classes, and those not entering the school at 
the beginning of the term, may be assisted at this hour to join 
existing classes, and any others needing special assistance. 

The town maintains eight schools, and the average number 
of pupils to a school is twenty-six and a fraction. The loss from 
non-membership is 57 out of 268, and from non-attendance is 29 
out of 211, a loss greater than the average for three schools, a 
loss of more than 37 1-2 per cent, or in dollars and cents, of 
$1000. This is as real a loss as an investment in Massachusetts 
Central railway stock, or in many of the gold and silver mines. 
It is none the less a loss because the town can continue and must, 
continue to make appropriations for the support of its schools. 
The loss from non-membership cannot be prevented by legal 
measures, for the compulsory law requires only two-thirds of the 
persons iucluded in the enumeration to attend school at an, and 



33 

that two-thirds for only five-ninths of the time our schools are 
kept. We therefore bespeak the moral force of all friends of 
education and of the entire community, that motives may be 
brought to bear upon parents and guardians, to secure the at- 
tendance of their wards in our schools the entire year. Perhaps 
the child's need of an education, and the father's obligation to 
accept it for his child when freely offered, may secure his pres_ 
ence in the school, and possibly the need of a dinner or of help 
upon the farm may be more pressing, certainly less remote, than 
the need of the multiplication table in the far off future. 

The loss arising from irregular attendance and dismissals is 
more nearly within the reach of the school committee. They 
have the control of the schools, and therefore when a pupil comes 
into a school, he passes out from under the authority of the 
parent and becomes subject to another. Therefore the parent 
cannot demand that his child shall be dismissed before the end 
of the session. He may ask it as a favor, as he could ask that 
his boy be released for an hour if he was employed in a store or 
a factory, and the request would doubtless be granted. But if 
that request came so often as to seriously interfere with the 
work on hand, the request would be refused. 

If a pupil is absent from school it can be assumed that he is 
a truant, and the truant officer be sent after him. If the parent 
claims that he kept the child at home, and that he purposes to do 
that at his pleasure, and to send him back into school at his con- 
venience, the committee can shut the child out of school for the 
injury his irregular attendance is inflicting, and leave the law to 
deal with the father for not sending his child to school as the 
law requires. 

But, of course, no committee wishes to resort to legal meas- 
ures ; they wish to secure the good sought by moral means. So 
we bespeak the help of parents in this respect, and we beg of 
them not to forget that 

"Little drops of water, little grains of sand, 
Make the mighty ocean and the solid land;" 

that the constant accretion of dust makes the mole-hill, and if 
the process be long enough continued, the mole hill becomes a 

5 



34 

mountain, and so the occasional absences of all the children in 
all the "schools for the whole year make an aggregate perfectly 
appalling. 

It has been the purpose of your Committee to secure natural 
methods of teaching and reasonable discipline. We say natural 
methods, for committing to memory and reciting definitions 
which one does not understand, and blindly following rules which 
one does not comprehend, is unnatural and unprofitable.^ We 
say reasonable discipline, for a discipline without much reason, 
simply by a force pressing down from without, ma) secure order 
in the school-room, and orderly deportment in the school-yard, 
in the teacher's presence, but it never does and never can secure 
that self control essential to good citizenship. Unless there be 
something welling up from within which shall give control, there 
will be disturbance at public meetings, rudeness at the street 
corners, and boisterousness at unseasonable hours of the night. 
But while the effort has been to secure the best of instruction and 
perfect discipline, the success has been only partial. In some 
schools the instruction and the discipline have been excellent. In 
others the instruction has been excellent, but the government not 
all that was desirable, while in still others neither the teaching 
nor the discipline has been entirely satisfactory. 

If we are asked why we do not employ the best of teachers 
in all our schools, the reason is obvious. We cannot offer induce, 
ments sufficient to secure trained and experienced teachers from 
abroad. Experience is essential to a good teacher, but if a young 
lady has not taught, how can she obtain that experience, if no 
one employs her ? Her want of experience is not her fault, but 
her misfortune, and must continue to be till some one is coura- 
geous enough to give her a trial. Normal Schools have done 
much to secure correct methods of teaching, and to establish 
right principles of government, but perplexities will arise in a 
school of thirty or forty children gathered from almost any vil- 
lage, that were never thought of in an experimental or a practice 
class in a Normal School. 

For a similar reason, lack of sufficient inducement to remain, 
we are in danger of losing some of our best teachers. They 



35 

have served their apprenticeship, have gained their experience 
have achieved success, and have established a reputation. They 
have availed themselves of all the means of improvement within 
their reach, and have become excellent teachers, and becoming 
known, some superintendent of schools, or a member of a school- 
board, with the offer of a better salary, invites them to " come 
up higher." Against this there is neither law nor gospel — the 
one reads " thou shalt not muzzle the ox ;" the other, " The work- 
man is worthy of his meat." 

But we may lose them from other than pecuniary considera- 
tions. In large towns or cities they may find a grade of school 
more to their taste, or greater social or educational advantages 
or they may" think a change desirable to develop the best that is 
in them, and to prevent their falling into ruts. If from any cause 
they leave us, the schools must be supplied with teachers of less 
experience, perhaps with none. If teachers without experience 
are employed they will be but apprentices, and should be satisfied 
with the pay of an apprentice, and the town should accept the 
work of an apprentice. To demand the work of a journeyman 
or of a master builder, under such circumstances would be an 
injustice. 

Instruction in Music has been given by a special teacher, and 
her work has been supplemented by the regular teachers. The 
report upon that subject is inserted in this report. 

REPORT OF THE MUSIC TEACHER, 

To the School Committee : 

I have given instruction to eacfy school one-half hour per 
week during the school year. The singing has been conducted 
between my lessons, by the teachers. 

The Tonic-Sol-Fa System has been before the younger child- 
ren, while Music Readers have been used by the Primary and 
Grammar Schools. 

Thorough work in time, tune, enunciation and expression, 
has been the aim. 



36 

While different degrees of aptness and ability are percepti- 
ble, yet with the exception of some pupils whose attendance has 
been limited and irregular, all have evinced a desire to learn, and 
an increasing zeal and enthusiasm has been manifested, the only 
drawback having been irregular attendance on the part of many. 
There are good voices and promising singers among the boys and 
girls of Hatfield. 

AUGUSTA F. SHATTUCK. 



STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EMPLOYED, 

&c. 

HILL GRAMMAR . 

Miss Nellie A. Waite. 

Number scholars enrolled, 32 

Average membership, 28.87 

Average attendance, 20.97 

Number scholars over 15 years of age, 8 

Number weeks school, 36 

Amount paid as wages, $252.00 

HILL PRIMARY. 

Miss Carrie C. Cutter. 

Number scholars enrolled, 49 

Average membership, 37.21 

Average attendance, 34.76 

Number weeks school, 36 

Amount paid as wages, $216.00 

CENTER GRAMMAR. 

Misses Eunice J. Morton, Kate Wells, and Lillian A. Brown. 

Number scholars enrolled, 34 

Average membership, 24.10 

Average attendance, 19.78 

Number scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Number weeks school, 34 2-5 

Amount paid as wages, $240.80 



37 

CENTER PRIMARY . 

Miss Carrie L. Warner. 

Number scholars enrolled, 39 

Average membership, 33.26 

Average attendance, t 30.08 

Number weeks school, 36 

Amount paid as wages, $252.00 

WEST HATFIELD SPRING TERM. A 

Mrs. Lizzie A. Kingman, Principal; Miss Gertie A. Strong, 

Assistant. 

Number scholars enrolled, 49 

Average membership, 42.33 

Average attendance, 37.13 

Number scholars over 15 years age, 1 

Number weeks school, 11 
Amount paid as wages, principal, $77.00; assistant, $33.00, $110. 

WEST HATFIELD FALL AND WINTER TERMS. 



(jrJKAMMAK. 




Miss Annie E. Bourne. 




Number scholars enrolled, 


25 


Average membership, 


20.90 


Average attendance, 


19.92 


Number scholars over 15 years of age, 


1 


Number weeks school, 


25 


Amount paid as wages, 


$175.00 


WEST HATFIELD PRIMARY. 




Fall and Winter Terms. 




Miss Minnie A. Bourne. 





Number scholars enrolled, 


28 


Average membership, 


25.7£ 


Average attendance, 


22.16 


Number weeks school, 


22 3-5 


Amount^aid as wages, 


$163.80 



38- 

WEST BROOK. 

Miss Martha Gardner. 



Number of scholars enrolled, 




35 


Average membership, 




27.03 


Average attendance, 




24.30 


Number scholars over 15 years of age, 




2 


Number weeks school, 




35 


Amount paid as wages, 




, $245 00 


FARMS. 






Miss Hattie L. Haven. 






Number scholars enrolled, 




24 


Average membership, 

Average attendance, 

Number scholars over 15 years of age, 




16.36 

13.46 

3 


Number scholars under 5 years of age, 




3 


Number weeks school, 




35.10 


Amount paid as wages, 


• 


$245 70 


APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 




.Balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriated by the town, 
Received from State Fund, 


$ 48 21 

1,950 00 

216 80 




Dog Fund, 

Tuitions Northampton, 


,77 32 
27 00 


$2,319 33 


Amount expended for teachers, 

wood and coal, 


$1,900 30 
129 49 


care of schoolhouses, 


70 45 




Balance unexpended, 


219 09 


$2,319 33 


• , 


$162 00 


Appropriation for Music, 
Amount paid Mrs. Shattuck, 


$225 00 


For Music books, 


36 16 




Balance unexpended, 


26 84 


$225 00 







39 

SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Number of persons between .5 and 15 years, 262 

Number of persons between 8 and 14 years, 167 

Number scholars enrolled, 268 

Number scholars between 5 and 15 years, 255 

Number scholars between 8 and 14 years, 170 

Average membership in all schools for the year, 211.43 

" attendance '• " " " 182.47 

Number scholars over 15 years of age, 10 

Number scholars under 5 years of age, 3 

SCHOOLS AND SUPPLIES. 

Amount expended for these items for the year $331.88 A 
large part of this amount has been for readers, which had been 
supplied by the town only to a limited extent the year previous. 
Readers, and to a less extent, other books on hand, either new, or 
partially worn, have necessarily accumulated, and will be available 
for use in the future. Sufficient time has not elapsed since the 
town has supplied the schools in this way for us to determine the 
average yearly waste of books and supplies. We think, however, 
that $250 for next year, will meet the needs of the schools for 
these items, including this year's deficiency. 

Estimate of expenditure for 1886 : 

For Schools, $1,850 00 

Books and supplies, 250 00 

Music, 150 00 

Respectfully Submitted, 



E. A. HUBBARD, ) « ,"■ , 
H. G. MOORE, V 3 ch0 ?i 
C. M. BARTON, ) Com ^tee. 



Hatfield, March 8, 1886. 



AXNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



For the Year Ending March 1, 1887. 



NO 1 J T H AM PTON, MASS . : 

WADE, WARNER & CO., PRINTERS. 
1887. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting to be held 
March 21, 1887. 



Article 1. — To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary Town officers for the 
year ensuing, including three persons for members of the 
School Committee, one for three years, one for two years 
and one for one year. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the Will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as sub- 
mitted by the selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Treasurer, 
and School Committee and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on Town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to 
defray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the Town will adopt for 
the maintenance and repairs of highways and bridges the 
ensuing j^ear. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the Town will take in rela- 
tion to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the Town will raise money to pay 
the outstanding debts of the Town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation 
for the public library and choose a committee for the same. 

Art. 12. — To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year. 

Art. 13. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation 
to defray the expenses of celebrating "Memorial Day." 



Art. 14. — To take action under Chap. 100, Sec. 5, of the 
Public Statutes. The vote must be by separate ballot, yes, 
or no, in answer to the question: "Shall licenses be granted 
for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town ?" 

A ht. 15. — To see if the Town will pay a bounty for the 
killing of noxious animals and birds. 

Art. 16. — To see if the Town will employ a teacher of 
music in the schools. 

Art. 17. — To see what action the Town will take in rela- 
tion to the railroad crossings in the Town, and to act on all 
matters between the-Town and the railroads running through 
the Town. 

Art. 18. — To see if the Town will take action in relation 
to the cemeteries of the Town. 

Art. 19. — To see if the Town will provide another public 
water trough. 

Art. 20. —To see if the Town will buy a road machine. 



Selectmen's Eeport, 



1100 00 


75 00 


115 00 


75 00 


100 00 


75 00 


is as the 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield, 

HIGHWAYS. 

As directed by the town, we contracted with the fol- 
lowing named parties to perform the ordinary repairs on the 
highways and bridges in their several highway districts : 

D. W. Wells, South Center District, 

Fred. Carl, North Center District, 

Ben. M. Warner, Hill District, 

Frank J. Saffa, West Hatfield District, 

Chas. A. Jones and W. H. Belden, West Farms, 

John Fitzgibbon, West Brook, 

We have settled with but two of these pa 
final accounts of the rest have not been presented to us. 

We have allowed D. W. Wells $10.72 for over work. 

We have inserted an article in the Warrant to see if the 
Town will buy a road machine. The agent of the "New 
Champion," asked us to store one of his machines for the 
winter, so that the town after trial, could buy it if they 
wished to do so. 

BRIDGES. 

We have expended $93.64 in excess of the appropria- 
tion for bridges, which was less than we recommended. 

The bridges of the town are in fair condition. A little 
more money could have been expended advantageously the 
past season in our opinion. 

POOR. 

The wisdom of the policy pursued by us for several 
years is shown by the fact that we have but few families or 
young children that we are aiding. We have found places 



6 

for a number of children where they have been adopted, 
and have helped families to take care of themselves so that 
now while our list of full support paupers is quite large and 
rather expensive, it is mostly composed of old people. It 
may be well for the town to consider whether or not it will 
be advisable to keep them all at one place. 

We are now hiring the following named persons boarded: 

Charles Morton, aged 72, $3.00 per week. 
Michael Ryan, aged 79, $2.00 per week. 
Patrick Russell, aged 60, $2.75 per week. 
Joseph Beauregard, aged 75, $2.00 per week. 
Letty Wheeler, aged 7, $1.50 per week. 
John Tobin, aged 5, $1.50 per week. 

Besides A. M. Richmond and Catherine Tobin, insane 
at the Hospital, Joseph Proulx and family are being tempo- 
rarily aided by the Overseers of Poor of Northampton at 
our expense, because of sickness. 

TOWN DEBT. 

We congratulate the tax payers that at the end of next 
year the town may be out of debt. The balance against 
the town at the end of last year of $2,758.12, being now re- 
duced to less than $1,000.00. 

Our expenditures we report as follows: 



OLD BILLS. 




Wm. H. Belden, salary registrar 
Joseph S. Wells, " 


of voters, 


$10 00 
12 50 


A. L. Strong, assistance to " 


it 


5 00 


Alvin L. Strong, building committee school 
house, 


5 00 


Fred. Carl, labor on highways, 
Patrick Mullarney, labor on highways, 
Fred. Wheeler, " " 


61 11 

7 35 
62 


Daniel A. Vining, '* 
Henry A. Wade, " 
Anthony Douglass, " 
Charles E. Wilkie, 


44 
u 
44 
u 


3 93 
3 25 
1 50 
1 30 


Lawrence Vollenger, " 


44 


1 25 


Alfred Breor, " 


a 


6.50 


T. Baggs, " 


a 


5 50 


E. W. Field, 


44 


8 20 


Peter Balise, " 


44 


3 15 


Wm. B. Langdon, " 
John Dimleon, • " 


44 

44 


1 62 

1 25 


John D. Brown, " 


44 


2 25 


J.D.Porter, 


44 


5 17 


A. H. Marsh, " 


44 


3 00 


F. H. Bardwell, 


44 


11 50 


H. S. Hubbard, earth, 




5 15 


Peter Saffa, labor on bridges, 
Michael Boyle, labor on bridges, 
Michael O'Dea, " 




5 00 

5 75 
5 00 


A. S. Jones, " 




2 00 


H. Shumway, " " 

Caleb D. Bardwell, care of Town hall, 


3 25 

8 00 


Brown & Bailey, mason work, 


Hill School 




House, 




39 77 



1234 87 



POOR. 

Michael Flavin, board of Tobin children, $60 00 
Sisters of Charity, Holyoke, board of Tobin 

children, 48 00 

Mary Wheeler, board of Letty Wheeler, 78 00 

N. L. Hospital, board of Catherine Tobin, 180 03 

A. M. Richmond, 191 b6 

" " Pomeroy Doppman, 58 80 

Mrs. T. Graves, house rent " 8 00 



8 

E. M. Martin, goods Charles Morton, $1 43 

Wm. W. -Field, board Charles Morton, 169 15 
Dr. Seymour, medical attendance, C. Morton, 2 00 

John Karin, board of Michael Ryan, 59 00 

Mary E. Waite, support, 55 00 

" house rent, 24 00 

Clifford Russell, board of Patrick Russell, 82 50 

Peter Pecor, " " 35 75 

Edward Farlin " " 30 25 

Joseph Baker, board Joseph Beauregard, 64 00 

T. Baggs, lodging tramps, 39 00 

Mrs. John Setright, board James Shea, 24 00 

J. H. Howard, goods, James Shea, 2 88 

Railroad fare, James Shea, 40 
City of Northampton, support of Mrs. Jos. 

Martin," 14 16 



Paid by Town of Wenham : 

Mrs. Dodge, cash support, $45 00 

Wm. H. Dickinson, house rent, Mrs. Dodge, 24 00 

J. E. Doane, wood, " 3 T5 

John Karin, wood, " 7 00 

Michael Dea, drawing wood, " 1 00 

H. Shumway, drawing wood, 1 50 



-$1,227 91 



•$82 25 
To be paid by State : 
H. Shumway, wood for Joseph Patrick, $4 00 

SCHOOLS. 

Eunice J. Morton, teaching schools, $245 00 

Carrie L. Warner, " 245 00 

Kate Wells, " 243 60 

Nellie Waite, " 245 00 

Marv L. Waite, " 182 00 

Minnie A. Bourne, u 77 00 

Hattie L. Haven, " 77 00 

Lottie Porter, " 156 00 

Elsie L. Elder, " 150 50 

Carrie Porter, " 63 00 

Gertie A. Strong, " . 54 00 

Hattie Stedman, " 78 00 

Lulu Field, " 60 00 



9 



Eddie Burke, janitor, 

Eugene Jubinville, janitor, 

G. W. Hubbard, 

Frank Cutter, 

J. H. Sanderson, " 

H. G. Moore, cash for janitor, 

H. G. Moore, 

Mrs. John Smith, " 

C. C. Wolfram, 

Smith & Dwight, coal, 

E. M. Martin, coal, 

H. G. Moore, drawing coal. 

John Maxwell, wood, 

J. W. Field, 

H. Shumway, " 

John B. Smith, sawing wood, 

Philos Doane, 4 - " 



$1 45 

3 25 

11 00 

22 00 

19 50 

20 34 
19 50 
15 45 
10 38 
71 13 
28 13 

7 75 
10 00 

8 00 
6 00 
2 18 
2 50 



-$2,134 m 



SCHOOL BOOKS. 



A. C. Stockin, 


$51 25 


S. E. Bridgman & Co., 


121 76 


D. Appleton & Co., 


5 46 


Harper & Bros., 


27 60 


F. M. Ambrose, 


4 40 


Van Antwerp Bragg & Co., 


16 35 


H. G. Moore, express. 


1 75 



$228 57 



MUSIC IN SCHOOLS, 



Prof. Charmbury, 



$150 00 



HIGHWAYS. 




D. W. Wells, 


$110 72 


Fred. Carl, 


50 00 


Benj. M. Warner, 


86 25 


C. H. Jones & W. H. Belden, 


100 00 


Frank Saffa, 


55 00 



10 



John Fitzgibbons, 




150 00 


Marble Hammil, 


BRIDGES. 


8 40 

$460 81 


John Maxwell, plank, 




165 62 


C. B. Dickinson, plank, 




84 97 


Estate of J. A. Billings, 


plank, 


6 27 


J. A. Sullivan, cement, 




7 50 


John Landy, stone, 




16 50 


J. L. Mather, mason woi 


•k, 


29 00 


J. H. Howard, spikes, 




2 46 


S. W. & A. B. Lee, drain pipe, 


11 25 


L. S. Bliss, plank, 




2 11 


D. W. Wells, cash for di 


■ain, 


17 54 


John Kiley, labor, 




12 00 


John Gay, " 




2 82 


John Sheehan, labor, 




11 50 


Michael Boyle, " 




9 25 


Mac. LaMountain, labor, 




7 11 


Thomas Whalen, kt 




7 11 


John Burk, " 




3 75 


C. W\ White, 




7 10 


John Fitzgibbons, " 




17 60 


Chas. K. Morton, " 




17 75 


J. D. Porter, 




12 25 


D. W. Wells, 




5 75 


Benj. M. Warner, " 




3 36 


S. W. Kingsley, " 




9 15 


H. Shumway, " 




16 50 


Micheal O'Dea, 




75 


J. D. Thayer, 




1 25 


E. M. Martin, spikes, 




92 


James Mullins, labor, 




4 50 

1393 64 



11 

HIGHWAYS. 

(special repairs) hill district. 

J. D Porter, drain tile, 
J. D. Porter, labor, 
John McGrath, labor, 
A. Allair, labor, 
Frank Lovette, labor, 
David McGrath, 
David Fitzgerald, 
E. S. Warner, 
James Porter, 
Chas. E. Kingsley, 
Patrick Mullarney 
Ben. M. Warner, 
L. S. Dyer, 
J. T. Fitch, 
M. N. Hubbard, 
Thomas Whalen, 
H. Shumway, 
A. H. Graves, 
Thaddeus Graves, 
M acLaMountain, 

199 79 
(special repairs) north center district. 



$4 75 


15 


25 


1 


87 


2 50 


1 


87 


8 


75 


2 


50 


9 


75 


6 


93 


1 


25 


1 


25 


4 


87 


6 50 


.11 


00 


4 


50 


2 


50 


9 


75 


3 


25 


3 


25 


2 


50 



Fred. Carl, labor, 


#47 30 


Wm. B. Langdon, labor, 


19 25 


Edwin Brainard, 


23 63 


James Breor, 


16 25 


John Fitzgibbon, 


7 75 


John Karin, 


4 38 


L. S. Crafts, 


1 75 


Michael Clancy, 


1 88 


Charles W. Wolfram, 


12 87 


earth, 


5 00 


C. G. Waite, earth, 


10 00 



1150 06 



12 
SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 



H. G. Moore, supplies, 


9.39 92 


H. A. Brackett, painting roofs, 


21 67 


S. W. Kingsley, repairs, 


8 50 


W. B. Langdon, repairs, 


2 50 


W. L. Smith & Co., table, 


2 50 


Eames & Sprague, stores, 


73 04 


J. H. Howard, supplies, 


18 33 


Geo. E. Coats, repairs, 


5 95 


Mrs. Michael O'Dea, cleaning, 


2 75 


John Burke, " 


6 00 


John Sheehan, u 


2 75 


John Smith, 


3 00 


E. M. Martin, supplies, 


$4 78 


John Springer, u 


1 85 


D. J. Wright, 


1 20 


Win, Daugherty, repairs, 


2 50 



$197 24 



REPAIRS ON HILL SCHOOL HOUSE. 



C. N. Harlow & Co., 


1191 90 


David Laidley, mason work, 


4 37 


M..H. Burke, painting, 


29 20 


H. G. Moore, labor, 


18 50 




* 0/ H 07 




'jpArtO V t 


TOWN OFFICERS. 




1885. 




Chas. K. Morton, Selectman, 


$125 00 


Eurotas Morton, " 


58 00 


R. P. Smith, 


50 00 


E. A. Hubbard, School Committee, 


50 00 


Henry G. Moore, " " 


50 00 


A. L. Strong, Tax Collector, 


125 00 


Wm. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, 


100 00 



13 
TOWN OFFICERS. 

1886. 

E. F. Billings, Assessor, $55 00 

A. L. Strong, " 55 50 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk and Registrar 

of voters, (part payment) 50 00 

D. W. Wells, Elector, 10 00 



$728 50 



STATE AID. 

Mrs. Covill, $38 00 

Mrs. Anderson, . 38 00 



$76 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

S. E. Bridgman & Co., books, $125 65 

E. F. Billings, librarian, 12 50 

Mrs. Leary, cleaning room, 1 50 

Philos Doane, sawing wood, 1 00 

Cutting, Brewster & Draper, repairing stove, 6 44 
R. M. Woods, books, 5 50 

H. Shumway, wood, 4 00 

J. H. Howard, lamps and oil, two years' bill, 9 50 



$166 09 



MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS. 

E. A. Hubbard, cost of drain, $94 00 
J. H. Howard, Memorial Day expenses, 50 00 
Wm. H. Dickinson, president village im- 
provement society for cemeteries, 100 00 
A. L. Strong, cash for printing, 6 00 
Gazette Printing Co., order book and printing, 5 57 
S. E. Bridgman & Co., stationary, 4 28 
J. C. Hammond, legal services and fees in 

Tobin case, 26 54 



14 



Wade, Warner & Co., printing town reports 
and license ballots. ; 

Peter McHugh, repair stove. Town hall. 
L. S. Crafts, care of water trough. 
A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 
Morris Fitzgibbons. care water trough. 
Wm. G. Bassett. legal services and fees paid 

in N. H. & N. Co.'s petition. 
S. W. Kingsley. repairs road scraper. 
J. T. Thayer. 

H. Shumway. express on books. 
J. D. Porter, cash for watching tires. 
Cha>. K. Morton, railroad fares and expenses. 4 
" - cash witness fees, 

cash postage. 
J. H. Howard, burner. Town hall. 
Wm. ('. Dickinson, cash bounties. 



*43 


15 


1 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


o 


50 


" 19 


06 


6 


75 


1 


25 


8 


50 


3 


On 


«, 4 


90 


2 


00 


2 


00 




20 


51 


20 



*442 90 



Respectfully submitted. 



CHAS. K. MORTON. 

JONATHAN D. PORTER. 

C. A. JONES. ) Hatfield 



) Selectmen 
< of 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen for the 
year ending March 1. 1887, and have found them correct 
with proper vouchers on file for all warrants drawn amount- 
ing to seven thousand twentv dollars and eighty-two cents. 
I 17,020.82.) 

C . S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 



Hatfield, March 5. 1887 



15 

Appropriations Town of Hatfield, 1886. 



Town Debt, 


$1,000 00 


Memorial Day, 


50 00 


Music in Schools, 


150 00 


Cemeteries, 


100 00 


E. A. Hubbard, 


94 00 


Highways and Bridges, 


850 00 


Schools, 


1,700 00 


Poor, 


1,200 00 


Contingencies, 


800 00 


Town Officers, 


900 00 


Interest, 


200 00 


School Books, 


250 00 


Public Library, 


325 00 


School House Hill District, 


150 00 


Highways Special rejmirs, 


275 00 




®Q 1 1 00 




!(PO,v-± i T \_f\i 



Jury List Reported by the Selectmen, 



Michael Larktn, Chas. L. Warner, 

Chas. E. Hubbard, Albert H. Webber, 

Alpheus Cowles, Thomas J. Ryan, 

J. E. Porter, Jonathan D. Porter, 

Daniel W. Wells, O. S. Graves, 

Philip Carl, Eurotas Morton, 

Eugene I. Morton, Chas. S. Shattuck, 
E. M. Martin. 



Treasurer's Report. 



Wm. C. Dickinson, Teeasueee, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account, 
Cash rec'd from Alv. L. Strong, collector, 
National Bank Tax, 
Corporation Tax, 
Income School Fund, 
State Aid, 
Dog Fund, 
Town of Wenham, support 

of Mrs. Dodge, 172 40 

Sale of Town land, 30 00 

Town of Hadley, for ferry 

boat, 26 25 

Memorial day appropriation, 14 00 
Town of Whately, tuition, 5 00 
Over pay school books, 4 00 

- 111,039 77 

3 



n 


.,468 28 


«,184 34 




1,769 91 




437 44 




217 59 




108 00 




70 84 





18 

TO CASH RECEIVED FROM LOANS. 

State Treasurer, 3i per cent., $1,500 00 

4 per cent., 1,500 00 

$3,000 00 

CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 

State Treasurer, 3f per cent., $1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 4i per cent., 1,000 00 

L,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

I 

) 

$6,500 00 



u u 



500 00 
500 00 



(,(. u u 



$22,008 05 



Or 



By cash paid 


Selectmen's order, 


$7,020 


82 




Old orders, 1885-86, 


1,085 


29 




County Tax, 


1,348 


22 




State Tax, 


810 


00 




Interest on notes, 


306 


47 




Insurance, 


140 


00 




State Treasurer National Bank 






Tax refunded, 


13 


32 

$10,724 12 



BY CASH PAID ON LOANS. 



State Treasurer, 1,500 00 

1,500 00 
Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000 00 

$4,000 00 



19 



BY CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 



State Treasurer, 
Hampshire Savings Bank, 

u u 
u u 
a u 

U U 

u u 


$1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
500 00 
500 00 

tfi ^00 00 


Balance in Treasury, 


783 93 



$22,008 05 



IN ACCOUNT WITH ALVIN L. STRONG, COLLECTOR. 



Dr. 



To cash received, 

Order of abatement, 



1,184 34 

29 85 



Balance uncollected taxes, 



Or. 



1,214 19 

981 42 

>,195 61 



By uncollected taxes 1885-86, 
Assessors' warrant, 1886-87, 



$496 96 
8,698 65 



),195 61 



SUMMARY. 



State Treasurer, note due April 7, 1887, $1,500 00 

Dec. 1, 1887, 1,500 00 

$3,000 00 



20 



Cash in Treasury, 


1783 93 


Uncollected taxes, 


981 42 


Due from City of Northampton : 




Smith Charities' tax, 


123 53 


Interest on above, 


7 41 


State and Military Aid, 


76 00 


Tuition Northampton scholars, 


50 00 


State on account State paupers, 


4 00 




«2L026 29 



Balance against the Town, $973 71 

WM. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 



I have this day examined the books and vouchers of the 
Treasurer and found them correct. 



C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 7, 1887. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield, for the year 
1886, are as follows : 



BIRTHS BY MONTHS, 





NO. 


MALES. ' 


FEMALES, 


January, 


6 


9 


4 


February, 


4 


3 


1 


Ma.ch, ' 


1 


J 




April, 

May, 
June, 


3 
3 
4 


9 
1 

3 


1 

2 
1 


July, 
August, 


6 
1 


4 
1 


2 


September, 
November, 


6 
1 


4 
1 


2 


December, 


4 


1 


3 


Total, 


39 ' 


23 


16 




PARENT/ 


lGE 





Native born 18, Foreign born 15, Foreign born father 
and native mother 3, Foreign born mother and native born 
father 3. 



22 



Birth rate for five previous years 



1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


1886 


33 


24 


27 


33 


32 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 



January, ■ 

May, . 

September, . 

November, .... 


1 

. 1 

2 

. 1 


All were first marriage of both parties. 


5 


Age youngest bride, 
Age oldest bride, 
Age youngest bridegroom, 
Age oldest bridegroom, 


19 years. 
25 " 

22 " 
34 " 



Of the persons married, native born 3 couples. 
Native born groom, foreign born bride, 2 couples. 

Number of marriage certificates issued from this office, 6. 
Marriages for five previous years : 



1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


1885 


12 


6 


17 


10 


9 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 



NO. 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
2 



23 

October, . . . . . .12 

November, ..... 3 

December, . . . . * .2 

Total, 24 











MALES, 


FEMALES 


Under 5 years of age, 






5 


4 


Between 5 and 10 years 


of 


age, 




1 


u 


20 " 30 


44 




1 




u 


40 " 50 


44 






1 


44 


50 " 60 


44 




1 




u 


60 « 70 


44 






1 


(.4 


70 " 80 


44 




4 




u 


80 " 90 


44 




3 
14 


3 
10 



Age of the oldest persons deceased were one male 84 
years, one female 85 years. 

Of the number deceased, 22 were native and 2 foreign 
born. 

Death rate for five previous years : 

1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 1885. 

23 25 29 22 24 

Causes of death classified according to the nomenclature 
adopted by the State Board of Registration : 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Croup, ...... 4 

Erysipelas, . . „ . . .1 

Cholera infantum, . . . . . 1 

Diarrhea, . . . . . .1 

CONST ETUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Cancer, . . . . . 2 

Tabes Mesenterica, . . . . .1 

Hydrocephalus, . . . . . 1 



24 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Paralysis, . . . . . . . 3 

Disease of heart, . . .. . .2 

Convulsions, ..... 2 

Pneumonia, . . . . . .1 

Brights disease, . . . . 1 

Insanity, . . . . 1 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 

Old age, . ■ . . . ^ . 1 

Premature birth, . . . ... .1 

VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Lightning, . . . . , 1 

24 



STATEMENT OF THE DOG TAX ACCOUNT. 

VV. D. Billings, Town Clerk, in account with the Town of 
Hatfield : 

Dr. 

To cash received from Dec. 1, 1885 to Dec. 
1, 1886, for license of 51 dogs (males) 
at |2 each, 1102 00 

To cash received for license of 2 clogs (fe- 
males) at $5 each, 10 00 

$112 00 

Less Clerk's fees, 53 dogs at 20 cents each, 10 60 

$101 40 



25 

Or. 

By cash paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, $101 40 

Amount paid County Treasurer on this account for five 
previous years : 

1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 1885. 

$59.40 163 880.40 $72 $92.40 

There have been recorded in the Town Clerk's office 
from March 1, 1886 to March 1, 1887, 20 mortgages of per- 
sonal property, one assignment of wages. All other papers, 
three. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



IR, IE F O IR; T 



OF THE' 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Fellow Citizens: 

Your School Committee herewith present the annual 
report upon the condition of the Schools. 

The schools the past year have been maintained thirty- 
five weeks, at an expense, including the cost for music, books 
and supplies of a little more than §2,500. 

The number of persons between the ages of five and 
fifteen years in the town, May 1, 1886, was 256. The num- 
ber between the ages of eight and fourteen years was 157. 
The number of scholars enrolled in the schools was 248. 
The average membership in all the schools for the year was 
194, and the average attendance 169. 



28 

The schools have been more than ordinarily successful. 
To a large extent, the experienced teachers of previous years 
have been retained, and the few inexperienced teachers we 
have been obliged to employ have shown good results. 

Our schools are not well graded, and under our cir- 
cumstances cannot be. We are a scattered population, and 
the number of persons between five and fifteen years of age 
is not large, and hence it is practically impossible to bring a 
great number of pupils into any one of our school buildings. 
We have but two grades, the primary and the grammar, but 
the grammar grade might with more propriety be called the 
intermediate if we had anything above it. Were there a 
vacant room in the Center School house, it would be possible 
without great additional expense to the town to bring the 
highest class from at least three of our grammar schools into 
that building. This would make a school of fifteen to 
twenty pupils, would provide for a grade that might prop- 
erly be called grammar, would furnish at the expense of the 
town one year more of school privilege to its advanced 
pupils, and would give them a fair education even if they 
did not afterward enter Smith Academy. 

The department of music has been in charge of Prof. 
Charmbury, and the progress made and the enthusiasm awak- 
ened have satisfied the committee and we trust also our fel- 
low citizens that the money has been well expended. 

The expense of the repairs upon the Hill School house 
exceeded the appropriation, for it was found impossible 
otherwise to make the repairs contemplated when the town 
made the appropriation, and after the work was begun it 
was necessary to complete it that there might be a school 
there in the fall term. 



29 

STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHEES EMPLOY- 
ED, &C. 



CENTER — GRAMMAR, 

Miss Nellie A. Waite. 

Number of bcholars enrolled, 23 

Average membership, 21.38 

Average attendance, 19.22 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Number weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, $245 

CENTER — PRIMARY. 

Miss Kate Wells. 

Number scholars enrolled, 45 

Average membership, 27.75 

Average attendance, 23.2 

Number weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, $245 

HILL — GRAMMAR . 

Miss Eunice J. Morton. 

Number scholars enrolled, 29 

Average membership, 25.5 

Average attendance, 20.5 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

Number weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, $245 



30 

HILL — PRIMARY. 

Miss Carrie L. Warner. 

Number scholars enrolled, 40 

Average membership, 29.33 

Average attendance, 26.25 

Number weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, 1245 

WEST HATFIELD — GRAMMAR. 

Misses Annie Bourne, Lottie Porter and Carrie Porter. 

Number school enrolled, 22 

Average membership, 15.03 

Average attendance, 13.63 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Amount paid as wages, $230 

WEST HATFIELD — PRIMARY. 

Misses Mary L. Waite and Gertrude Strong. 

Number scholars enrolled, 32 

Average membership, 29.79 

Average attendance, 25.88 

Number weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, 1236 

WEST BROOK. 

Misses Lottie Porter, Lulu Field and Hattie Stedman. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 36 

Average membership, 29.73 

Average attendance, 26.68 

Number weeks school, 34 

Amount paid as wages, $204 



31 

FARMS. 

Misses Hattie L. Haven and Elsie E. Elder. 

Number scholars enrolled, 21 

Average membership, 16.47 

Average attendance, 14.58 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Number weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, $227 50 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Number of persons between the ages of 5 and 15 years, 256 

" " ■ " 8 and 14 " 157 

Number of scholars enrolled, 248 

Number of scholars between the ages of 5 and 15 years, 229 

8 and 14 " '159 

Average membership in all the schools for the year, 194.53 

" attendance " " " 169.94 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 5 

APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 

Balance unexpended last year, $219 09 

Appropriated by the town, 1,700 00 

Received from State Fund, 217 59 

Dog Fund, . 70 84 

Tuition Whately, 5 00 



-$2,212 52 



Amount expended for teachers, $1,876 10 

wood and coal, 137 19 

care of schoolhouse, 121 37 

Balance unexpended, 77 86 

$2,212 52 



32 

Appropriation for music, $150 00 

Amount paid Prof. Charmbury, 150 00 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Amount expended for these items for the year is 1228.57, 
which has been judiciously expended, and your Committee 
are unable to devise any plan whereby a less sum than this 
can be used the coming year, as there must necessarily be 
be more or less yearly waste of books and supplies while 
this plan is pursued. We think, however, that $ 250 for 
next year will meet the needs of the schools for these items. 

Estimate of expenditures for 1887 : 

For Schools, $1,800 00 

Books and supplies, 250 00 

Music, 200 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. G. MOORE, ) Q , ■, 

DAVID BILLINGS, Jr. J n .J? 
E. A. HUBBARD. ) Committee - 

Hatfield, March 4, 1887. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OK THE 



TOWN OFFICEKS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield, 



For the Year Ending March i, 1888. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. : 

WADE, WARNER & CO., Printers. 

1888. 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEET- 
ING TO BE HELD MARCH 19th, 1888. 



Article 1. — To choose a moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary Town officers for the year 
ensuing, including two persons for members of the School Com- 
mittee, one for three years and one for one year. 

Art. 3 — To choose an Elector under the Will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submitted 
by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the report of the Selectmen, Treasurer, 
and School Committee and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to de- 
fray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year, 

Art. 8. — To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintenance and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the Town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the Town will raise money to pay the 
outstanding debts of the Town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation for 
the public library and choose a committee for the same. 

Art. 12. — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor for the ensuing year. 

Art. 13. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation to 
defray the expenses of celebrating " Memorial Day." 

3 



Art. 14. — To take action under Chap. 100, Sec. 5, of the 
Public Statutes. The vote must be by separate ballot, yes, or 
no, in answer to the question : " Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of intoxicating liquors in this town ?" 

Art. 15. — To see if the Town will pay a bounty for the kill- 
ing of noxious animals and birds. 

Art. 16. — To see if the Town will employ a teacher of music 
in the schools. 

Art. 17. — To see what action the Town will take in relation 
to the railroad crossings in the town, and to act upon all matters 
between the Town and the railroads running through the Town. 

Art. 18. — To see if the Town will take action in relation to 
the cemeteries of the Town. 

Art. 19. — To see what action the Town will take in relation 
to a portion of the tax of the year 1884 to be paid by the Smith 
Charities to the Town. 

Art. 20. — To see what action the Town will take in relation 
to rebuilding the foot-bridge near the Hill bridge. 

Art. 21 — To see if the Town will raise money to pay bills 
presented to the Town for repairs on Halls in the Town. 

Art. 22. — To see if the town will elect a Superintendent of 
the schools in Town. 

Art. 23.— To see if the town will re-seat the seats in the 
Grammar School room at West Hatfield, and also the one at 
West Brook. 



Selectmen's Report, 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield : 

As directed by a vote of the town at the last annual meet- 
ing, your Selectmen have purchased a road-machine, the New 
Champion, which we believe is giving good satisfaction, and is 
paying for itself with the amount of labor it saves on the roads. 
The heavy rains of the past summer have made it necessary to 
have a considerable amount of extra labor on the roads, which 
did not come under the head of ordinary repairs, therefore we 
have had some extra labor on the roads. We have built one 
new bridge and taken one apart which was taken from its found- 
ation by the water and have replaced it again. The rest of the 
bridges are in good repair as far as we can ascertain. It is un- 
certain to determine yet what thfi spring freshets may do with 
them. 

POOR. 

The policy pursued by the town for the last few years in 
boarding its poor, is not, in our estimation, a wise policy finan- 
cially for the town to adopt. We have had an addition of two 
the last year ; one has died ; the other is only partially support- 
ed. The others are the same as last year, with the exception of 
Mrs. Tobin who was boarded at the Hospital, has died within a 
few days, thus relieving the town of any further expense for her. 
Sixty-three tramps have had lodgings for the last year. 

5 



6 
OLD BILLS. 

Frederick Carl, work on highways, $30 00 

Frank Saffa, " " 20 00 

B. M. Warner, " " 28 75 
John Fitzgibbons " " 25 00 
Francis Moshier, " " 3 25 
Joseph Baker, " " 1 25 
Morris Fitzgibbons, work on highways, 2 50 
Moses E. Warner, " " 6 50 

E. F. Billings, librarian, 12 50 
G. W. Hubbard, janitor, 16 00 
Moses E. Warner, lumber, 2 34 

F. G. Bardwell, wood and lumber, 11 45 
A. L. Strong, stationery, 1 50 
M. H. Burt, repairs on school houses, 19 20 
Smith & Dwight, coal for schools, 44 50 
T, Baggs, lodging tramps, 19 00 
A. L. Strong, wood for schools, 2 50 
State of Mass., support of Eliza J. Merrer, 50 14 
Overseers of Poor, City of Boston, support of 

James E. Merrer, 18 05 

John Karin, board of Michael Ryan, 41 40 

David Billings, supplies and labor, schools, 6 50 

C. N.- Harlow, lumber and labor, school house, 4 92 
W. L. Smith, coffin and curtains, 3 95 
M. W. Lyons, meat for Joseph Patrick, 1 00 
C. M. Barton, recording births, 25 50 



POOR. 

Mary Wheeler, board of Lotta Wheeler, $78 00 

N. L. Hospital, board of Catherine Tobin, 178 51 

" " A.M.Richmond, 173 72 

Peter Baloise, board of Joseph Beauregard, 104 00 

W. W. Field, board Charles Morton, 158 80 

John Karin, board of Michael Ryan, 98 00 



$397 70 



$96 25 


49 


50 


51 


00 


22 50 


12 


50 


16 


00 


15 


00 


61 


11 


24 


00 


7 


00 


, 36 


00 


3 


53 


4 00 



Frank Lamprow, board of Patrick Russell, 

Lewis Murray, " " " 

Augustus Renellard, board of George Allair, 

John Allair, board of George Allair, 

Jonathan D. Porter, clothes for James Shea, 

Joseph Patrick, lodging tramps, 

T. Baggs, lodging tramps, 

Mary E. Waite, support, 

Mary E. Waite, house rent, 

Smith & Prindle, clothes for Michael Ryan, 

Sisters of Charity, Holyoke, board John Tobin, 36 

E. M. Martin, clothes for Charles Morton, 

W. W. Field, med. attendance Chas. Morton, 

City of Northampton, help rendered family of 

Joseph Proulx, 39 71 

City of Northampton, help for Daniel Dolon 

and wife, 
R. P. Smith, coal for Mr. Kenedy, 
Paid by the Town of Wenham, Mrs. Dodge, 

cash support, 
W. H. Dickinson, house rent, Mrs. Dodge, 
R. P. Smith, coal, 
D. A. Horton, coal, 
A. L. Strong, wood*' 

$1,387 29 
To be paid by the State : 
Help rendered to Daniel Dolon, 32 42 



8 


49 


45 


00 


24 


00 


3 


54 


, 9 


78 


2 


50 





SCHOOLS. 




Carrie L. Warner, 


teaching schools, 


245 00 


Eunice J. Morton, 


u 


245 00 


MaryL. Waite, 


u 


245 00 


Elsie E. Elder, 


u 


245 00 


Carrie S. Porter, 


a 


245 00 


Gertie A. Strong, 


u 


223 00 


Kate Wells, 


ct 


245 00 


Lotta A. Porter, 


a 


172 20 


Hattie A. Carl, 


u 


62 40 



$34 50 


26 50 


1 


50 


105 


70 


9 


00 


5 


80 


2 


85 


39 


29 


15 


75 


1 


50 


33 


55 


14 


39 


33 


75 


33 


25 


6 63 


19 


00 


3 


25 



8 

G. W. Hubbard, janitor, 

J. H. Sanderson, janitor, 

J. H. Sanderson, tools and cash paid, 

R. P. Smith, coal, 

N. J. Powers, wood and sawing, 

N. J. Powers, drawing coal, and janitor, 

John Manchester, janitor, 

E. M. Martin, coal, 

F. G. Bardwell, wood, 
S. S. Dwight, sawing wood, 
R. P. Smith, coal, 
Kimball & Cary, coal, 
S. E. Bridgman, reference books, 
Mrs. John Smith, Smith janitor, 
W. H. Powers, " 

G. E. Barton, « 
Fred Bardwell, 

$2,313 81 

SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

S, S. Dwight, $10 51 

Charles E. Hubbard, labor, 5 00 

Mrs. John Ryan, cleaning, 5 00 

George E. Barton, labor and cleaning, 5 00 

Frary Brothers, repairs on stoves, 29 65 

Clarence E. Belden, repairs and cleaning, 26 01 

Kate Wells, repairs and cleaning, 3 65 

E. M. Martin, supplies, 1 90 

E. E. Wood & Son, door mat, 4 00 

W. B. Langdon, labor, 15 77 

J. H. Sanderson,, labor, 5 40 

A. L. Strong, posts for fence, 8 48 

Joseph Champagne, slating and material, 30 51 

John Stader, labor, 7 50 

Frary Brothers, repairs, 15 53 

Wm. Dougherty, setting glass, 2 20 

E. A. Hubbard, coal hod and sifter, 1 35 



9 



E, M. Martin, supplies, $1 39 

M. B. Langdon, labor, 7 75 

C. E. Belden, repairs, 18 53 

E. E. Wood & Son, door mat 4 00 

S. S. D wight, supplies, 3 00 

Frary Brothers, stoves and fixtures, 29 69 

W. L. Smith, two chairs, 4 00 
S. W. Kingsley, labor and lumber for school 

houses, 21 85 

Shumway & Riley, repairs on stoves, 5 40 
Clarence E. Belden, repairs, labor, cash paid, 11 25 

J. H. Howard, furniture for schools, 3 67 

C. M. Barton, money paid for schools, 6 53 

To Betsey, cleaning, 3 50 

I. R. Clark, glass, 6 75 

G. E. Barton, labor, 3 75 



MUSIC IN SCHOOLS. 



MEMORIAL DAY. 



John E. Doane, music, 
Horace Shumway, team, 
A. L. Strong, cash paid, 



$1 65 


2 40 


62 64 


147 50 


1 00 


4 85 


4 64 


31 17 


$25 00 


5 00 


5 60 



$308 52 



Prof. Thomas Charmbury, $150 00 

SCHOOL BOOKS. 

S. S. D wight, books, 

S. S. D wight, books and stationery, 

Harper & Brothers, books, 

S. E. Bridgman, books, 

S. S. Dwight, express on books, 

Horace Shumway, express on books, 

C. M. Barton, school books, 

S. E. Bridgman " 



$255 85 



35 60 



10 



STATE AID. 




Mrs. Covill, 


$24 00 


Mrs. Anderson, 


24 00 


HIGHWAYS. 




A. W. Shaw, road machine, 


$250 00 


Horace Shumway, labor on highways, 


200,00 


Marble Hammil, labor at the Ferry, 


6 00 


George A. Cutter, work on railing, 


3 00 


Horace Shumway, labor, 


300 00 


BRIDGES. 




David McGrath, labor, 


$1 62 


David Fitzgerald, labor, 


62 


Charles Kingsley, 


1 00 


John Maxwell, lumber, 


29 91 


F. G. Bard well, lumber, 


18 98 


George Buddner, labor, 


4 87 


A. L. Strong, plank and lumber, 


105 61 


Charles Carson, labor, 


1 50 


John Dainhoin, labor, 


29 75 


S. W. Kingsley, labor and chain, 


2 75 


Peter Saffa, labor, 


21 00 


P. F. Newman, labor, 


7 75 


J. H. Howard, nails and spikes, 


3 68 


0. S. Graves, plank, 


4 66 


M. J. Ryan, spikes, 


2 80 


Moses E. Warner, lumber and labor, 


14 19 



HIGHWAYS. Special Repaies. 

James Kelly, labor. $1 25 

David Fitzgerald, labor, 1 25 

David McGrath, labor 1 25 



48 00 



$759 00 



$247 69 



11 



John Badzhold, labor, 




$6 


75 


George Steele, labor, 




3 


75 


C. L. Warner, labor, 




10 


25 


N. J. Powers, timber and cutting brush, 


11 


00 


J. D. Porter, labor, 




7 


68 


E. S. Warner, labor, 




6 


50 


B. M. Warner, labor, 




3 


25 


Joseph Newman, labor, 




1 


50 


Peter Saffa, labor, 




5 


50 


S. G. Hubbard, earth, 




10 


00 


Moses E. Warner, labor, 




6 


00 


Hor ice Shumway, labor, 




136 


00 

*2 1 1 m-] 


PUBLIC 


LIBRARY. 






R. M. Woods, books, 




113 50 


Fred A. Farnald, re-cataloguing Library, 


72 


00 


R. M. Woods, supplies, 




34 00 


R. M. Woods, purchases, 




5 


62 


S. E. Bridgman, books, 




59 


37 


Hubbard & Taylor, binding books, 


4 


20 


J. H. Sanderson, labor, 




38 


35 


W. D. Billings, " 




42 


00 


Smith & Livermore, lumber, 




12 


99 


R. M. Woods, Printing, 




4 


00 


J. H. Sanderson, cleaning, 




1 


87 


Philos Doane, sawing wood, 




1 


00 


A. L. Strong, wood, 




5 


00 


J. H. Howard, oil and supplies, 




4 


12 


Horace Shumway, expressage, 




4 


25 

$Q09 37 


OLD CEMETERY. 




. tpOVA O i 


Fred Clary, labor, 




88 50 


E. P. Hall & Co., lumber, 




20 


97 


Charles Kingsley, labor, 




3 


75 

&33 99 


Credited by cash, 




3 22 



00 



12 
TOWN OFFICERS, 1886. 

C. K. Morton, services as Selectman, expenses 

to Boston, $135 00 

C. A. Jones, services as Selectman, 50 00 

J. D. Porter, services as Selectman, 50 00 

Henry G. Moore, School Committee, 75 00 

David Billings, Jr., " " 25 00 

E. A. Hubbard, « " 35 00 

E. F. Billings, Constable, 9 00 

E. F. Billings, Assessor, cash for book, 35 24 

W. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, 100 00 

A. L. Strong, Collector of Taxes, 104 50 

Moses E. Warner, Assessor, 16 25 

W. D. Billings, Clerk and stationery, 53 25 



1887. 
J. Fitzgibbons, Assessor, 

C. L. Warner, " 
W. D. Billings, " 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, 

D. W. Wells, Elector, 
C. L. Graves, Constable, 

Clarence E. Belden, School Committee, 
W. D. Billings, Clerk, Registrar of Voters, 
W. D. Billings, recording births, marriages 

and deaths, 
W. D. Billings, serving town warrants, 
C. M. Barton, School Committee, 
S. S. Dwight, " 
George C. Marsh, " " 



MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT. 

W. D. Billings, schedule of Polls, $4 00 

W. D. Billings, record book, 3 00 
S. E. Bridgman, Tax Collector book and 

stationery, 4 73 



$55 00 


25 


00 


70 


00 


50 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


33 


00 


25 


00 


19 


90 


6 00 


50 00 


50 


00 


16 


33 



688 24 



413 23 



13 

W. H. Dickinson, Village Improvement So. $100 00 

J. D. Porter* repairs on town hall, 

L. H. Kingsley, Tax Collector blanks, 

C. D. Bard well, janitor town hall. 

Wm. Dougherty, setting glass town hall, 

Mrs. Lucy Morton, labor town hall, 

E. E. Wood & Son, fixtures town hall, 

A. L. Strong, shingle for hearse house, 

A. L. Strong, wood for town hall, 

A. L. Strong, posts and railing Depot road, 

A. M. Peck, recording deaths and mowing 

cemetery, 
J. D. Porter, order book, 
W. G. Bassett, legal services and fair paid in the 

N. H. & New Haven R. R. Co., petition, 31 58 
John Allair, funeral expenses George Allair, 20 00 
Morris Fitzgibbon, care of water trough, 2 50 

W. D. Billings, postage stamps, 1 25 

E. F. Billings, posting warrants, postage stamps, 3 75 

$287 94 

W. C. Dickinson, cash bounties, $47 80 

C. B. Dickinson, printing, 2 00 



8 


84 


2 75 


18 


25 


2 


00 


11 


12 


30 


45 


3 


77 


5 


00 


23 


95 


7 


50 


3 


50 



Respectfully submitted, 



$337 74 



JONATHAN D. PORTER,) Selectmen 
CHARLES A. JONES, [• of 

MOSES E. WARNER, ) Hatfield. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen for the year 
ending March 1, 1888, and have found them correct with proper 
vouchers on file for all warrants drawn, amounting to seven 
thousand eight hundred eighty-six dollars and nineteen cents. 
($7,886.19.) 

C. S. SHATTUCK, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 8, 1888. 



14 



Appropriations Town of Hatfield, 1887. 



Highways and Bridges, 


$1,600 00 


Schools, 


1,700 00 


Poor, 


1,200 00 


Contingencies? 


500 00 


Town Officers,' 


900 00 


Interest, 


250 00 


School Books, 


235 00 


Public Library, 


300 00 


Town Debt, 


1,000 00 


Music, 


150 00 


Cemeteries, 


100 00 


License Law, 


100 00 


Old Cemetery, 


30 00 


Repairs on School Houses, 


150 00 


Memorial Day, 


50 00 


■ 





18,265 00 



Jury List Reported by the Selectmen. 

The following is the list of jurors reported by the Selectmen 
for the acceptance of the town for 1888. 



Francis Moshier, 
Cooley B. Dickinson, 
Frank H. Porter, 
John EL Sanderson, 
Lewis A. Billings, 
Charles E. Hubbard, 
David Billings, Jr. 



Charles W. Marsh, 
John T. Fitzgibbons, 
Arthur F. Curtis, 
Michael Larkin, 
Fred H. Bardwell, 
Mathew J. Ryan, 
W. R. Langdon. 



Henry H. Field, 
Henry Wade, 
Edward Sheehan, 
E. M. Martin, 
Alpheus Cowles, 
Joseph Statder, 



Treasurer's Report. 



Wm. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town op Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account, 1783 93 

Cash rec'd from Alvin L. Strong, collector, % 981 42 

Cooley B. Dickinson, coll'r, 8,200 72 

National Bank Tax, 1,509 97 

Corporation Tax, 324 85 

School Fund, 217 33 

Dog Fund, 85 84 

State Aid, 84 00 
Town of Wenham, support 

of Mrs. Dodge, 84 79 

City of Northampton, tuition, 50 00 
Temporary support State 

paupers, 5 00 

Over pay teachers' salary, 5 60 



$11,549 52 



TO CASH RECEIVED PROM LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, $1,500 00 

« » 500 00 

$2,000 00 

15 



16 

CASH EECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOAN'S. 

State Treasurer, $1,500 00 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,500 00 



u 


u 


.1 


u 


c< 


a 


tt 


(C 


66 



1,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 
$5,000 00 



$19,333 45 
Or, 

By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $7,886 19 

State Tax, 1,215 00 

County Tax, 1,348 22 

Interest on notes, 201 07 

Old bill, Northampton Lunatic 
Hospital, support of Mrs. 
Caleb D. Bardwell, 80 76 

$10/731 24 

BY CASH PAID OK LOANS. 

State Treasurer, $1,500 00 

" " 1,500 00 

$3,000 00 

BY CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 

State Treasurer, 
Hampshire Savings Bank, 

(( U (( 



Balance in Treasury, 



$1,500 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
500 00 
500 00 


$5,000 00 
$602 21 




$19,333 45 



17 

IN ACCOUNT WITH ALVIN L. STRONG, COLLECTOR. 

Dr. 

To cash received, $981 42 

Cr. 
By uncollected taxes 1886-87, $981 42 

IN ACCOUNT WITH COOLEY B. DICKINSON, COLLECTOR. 

Dr. 

To cash received, $8,200 72 

Orders of abatement, 68 19 

Balance uncollected taxes, 368 33 



$8,637 24 



Cr. 
By Assessors' Warrant 1887-1888, $8,637 24 



SUMMARY. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, note, 



Cash in Treasury, 

Uncollected taxes, 

Due from City of Northampton : 
Smith Charities' tax, 
Interest on above, 
City of Northampton, tuition, 
Town of Whately, tuition, 
State on account State paupers, 



$1,500 00 




500 00 






$2,000 00 




$602 21 




368 33 




123 53 




7 41 




43 00 




5 00 




32 00 






$1,181 48 





Balance against the Town, $818 52 

WM. C. DICKINSON, Treasurer. 



18 

I have this day examined the books and vouchers of the 
Treasurer and found them correct. 

C. S. SHATTTTCK, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 8, 1888. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield, for the year 
1887, are as follows : 



BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 





NO. 


MALES. 


FEMALES, 


January, 

February, 

March, 


1 

2 
2 


1 
1 

2 


1 


April, 

May, 

June, 


1 
3 
1 


1 


1 

2 
1 


July, 
August, 


8 

2 


3 

2 


5 




September, 
October, 




8 



3 



5 


November, 


1 


1 





December, 


1 


1 






Total, 



30 



15 



15 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS. 



Born in United States, 
" Canada, 
" Germany, 



Father. Mother. 

17 18 

6 5 

5 4 



20 



Born in Ireland, 2 2 

" India, 1 



30 30 



Births for the five previous years : 



1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 

24 27 33 32 39 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. no. 

January, ....... 1 

March . . . . . . .1 

April, . 2 

June, . . . . . 1 

September, . . . . ..'■'. . 1 

Total, 6 

First marriage of both parties, 4 

First marriage bride, 2 

Second marriage groom, 2 
Age of oldest bride, 35 years; age of youngest brides, (2) 18 yrs. 
Age of oldest groom, 51 years ; age of youngest groom, 21 years. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 



Bride. 


Groom. 


Born in United States, 4 


5 


" Canada, 1 


1 


" Ireland, 1 





Total, 6 


6 


Number of certificates issued from this office, . 


6 


Marriages for five previous years : 




1882 1883 1884 1885 


1886 


6 17 10 9 


5 



21 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 





NO. 


MALES. 


FEMALES 


January, 

February, 

March, 



2 
4 





3 






2 
1 


April, 
May, 

June, 


1 
3 
2 


1 

3 
1 







1 


July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 


4 

2 
1 

1 


3 
1 

1 




1 
1 
1 



November, 













December, 













Total, 


20 


13 




7 


Under 5 years of age, 
Between 5 and 10, 






4 males, 
1 " 


6 females- 



" 30 and 40, 






« 


1 


" 40 and 50, 






« 


1 


" 50 and 60, 






" 


1 " 


•' 60 and 70, 






4 " 


1 


" 70 and 80, 






4 « 


2 



13 7 

Age of oldest person deceased, 79 years, 9 months. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Born in United States, 
" Ireland, 
" Germany, 



Males. 
10 

2 
1 

13 



Death rate for five preceding years : 

1882 1883 1884 1885 

25 29 22 24 



Females. 
4 
2 
1 



1886 
24 



22 

Causes of death classified according to nomenclature adopt- 
ed by the State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Croup, 1 

Cholera Infantum, 1 

Dysentery , 1 

Purpura, 1 

Typhoid fever, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Phthisis, (consumption of lungs,) 2 

Tubercular Meningetis, 1 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Fistula, 1 

Melaena, 1 

Nephria, (Bright's Disease,) 1 

Paralysis, 1 

Pneumonia, 3 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 

Infantile Debility, 1 

Old Age, 2 

Teething, 1 

VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Suicide, (Hanging,) I 






23 

DOGS. 

The number of Dogs licensed during the year ending Nov. 30. 
1887, with the receipts and settlement of the account, is as 
follows, viz. : 

RECEIPTS. 

51 male dogs, at $2.00 each, $102 00 

2 female dogs, at $5.00 each, 10 00 

$112 00 



Less fees, 53 Dogs, at 20 cents each, 10 60 



$101 40 
Paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, $101 40 

Amount paid County Treasurer on this account for the five 
previous years. 

1882. 1883. 1884. 1885. 1886. 

$80.40 $72 $92.40 $101.40 



There have been recorded in the Town Clerk's office, from 
March 1st, 1887, to March 1st, 1888, 20 mortgages of personal 
property, one assignment of wages. All other papers three. 

Respectfully submitted. 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE 



The Library Committee present the following Report : 

Of the $302.37, which has been expended this year for the 
Library, $86.94 was paid for books, binding and expressage. Of 
this sum, $59.37 was used to pay an old bill. 

The re-arranging and re-cataloguing cost $203.44. This amount 
exceeds somewhat the estimate of the Committee. The excess 
is due to the expense involved in supplying two new book cases, 
which were found to be necessary. The cases cost $26. 

The new system was at first a trial to some patrons, because 
they were denied direct access to the books. Your Committee 
are satisfied, however, that the system has many advantages to 
compensate for this deprivation. Now every book in the library 
has its place, determined by its subject ; and the librarian can 
tell at once where it is. The pupils in the Academy, under the 
direction of their teachers, and also the teachers and pupils in 
some of the public schools, are drawing more and more on the 
library, for help in their studies. 

It has been suggested that the present card catalogue be sup- 
plemented by a printed catologue. The Committee could not 
make such a catalogue this year, for lack of funds. They have 
doubts, too, of its expediency. Such a catalogue soon gets out 
of date. The Committee feel also, that the more the present 

25 



26 

catalogue is used, the more it will prove itself satisfactory and 
sufficient. 

There remains unpaid a bill for binding, of $63, due Messrs. 
Hubbard & Taber, of Holyoke. Your Committee would gladly 
have put off this work until another year. But the books that 
needed binding, were those most constantly called for. This 
fact led the Committee to have them bound without delay. 

Mr. Sanderson reports that about 130 books are issued each 
week. Of this number the pupils of the Academy take 30. 
About 150 cards are issued. This would mean that about one- 
half of the families in town patronize the Library. 

For the coming year, your Committee recommend an appro- 
priation of $250.00. 

Respectfully Submitted. 

ROBERT M. WOODS. 



:R,:E:po:R/r 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Our report shows a deficiency of $173.43 over receipts from all 
sources. Last year, with the same appropriation as this yeai*, 
there was an unexpended balance of $77.86. This balance, how- 
ever, should be reduced by $44.50— coal bill left unpaid — and 
$16.00 — janitor's bill left unpaid, which would leave unexpended 
$7.36. But that year was commenced with an unexpended bal- 
ance from the preceding year of $219.09; so the unexpended 
balance was reduced $211.73 during the year, showing that, on 
the basis of last year's ex]3enses, the appropriation was not large 
enough, with other money usually available, to run the schools. 

Expenses, however, have been larger than last year. Fuel 
bills have amounted to $220.68 against $181.69 last year — a dif- 
ference of $38.99. 

Teachers have received $51.50 more than last year and $13.00 
more than the average of the three years previous ; but the same 
rule has been followed as to wages as for the past few years 
— giving $6 per week for the first year's service and afterward 
$7. We might have displaced some of our experienced teachers 
at the end of the spring term and given their places to beginners 
at $6 per week ; but we considered this too great a risk of the 
efficiency of our schools to be made at that time. 

Janitor bills are much larger than in previous years except last 

27 



28 

year, and only 19.54 less than last year. The increased expen- 
diture for janitors, begun last year and continued through this, 
seems a justifiable outlay. 

Another item of expense has been $33.75 for encyclopedias. 
This was made under the regulation allowing .25 of the income 
of the State school fund to be used for maps and books of refer- 
ence. Some outlay was made for items of this class last year 
but does not appear in the report under this head. 

In making this purchase we have assumed that, while, like the 
extra outlay for experienced teachers, it might have been avoid- 
ed, the town does not choose to sacrifice everything pertaining 
to the efficiency of its schools to the question of economy. 

Our expenditures for maps and books of reference for the last 
six years has not been large — aggregating 191.20 or an average 
of $15.20 per year. This is less than has been expended in some 
neighboring towns where not nearly as much is done for schools 
as here. With the exception of the primary maps purchased 
last year, and which experience proves to have been a very judi- 
cious expenditure, we have not purchased wall maps or anatom- 
ical charts ; believing we could better get along without them 
than other things for which we needed the money. 

In making purchases, however, we have carefully discriminated 
against what was for mere show, and also everything that could 
be extemporized in the schoolroom. 

We think our schools would be much improved were they to 
adopt a definite course of study. Each year's work should be 
marked out and examinations of classes held to test their ability 
to go on with the next year's work. Much has been done by our 
teachers in the past to modernize their schools, so that some of 
the schools are in a condition to adopt such a course with little 
inconvenience. 

In the course we have prepared, the year's work will be about 
the same as is required of pupils of equal age in the grades of 
city schools. Thus the kind of instruction and the order of its 
introduction will be what is approved by experienced educators. 
To develop the pupil's mind symmetrically, according to the best 
models we have, more training of the eye and the hand than has 



29 

been usual in our schools will be required, and more cultiva- 
tion of language. 

The experiment of utilizing such a course will be tried in one 
or two at least of our schools the coming year. If such a course 
is adopted it will be more necessary even than now that all be- 
ginners should come in together each year and be kept in school 
continuously till their school course is ended. Without the ad- 
vantage of full time, children cannot expect to pass examina- 
tions and will have to drop into classes below. 

Extra work and outside assistance, more than ever before, will 
be found a poor substitute for regular school work. Teachers 
are now kept on duty an extra half hour each day solely to aid 
those who are behind on account of absences, but this accom- 
plishes only in a lame and deficient way the work done in the 
regular classes ; nor can teaching at home give better results. 

Teachers have done much work outside of school hours, and 
have been ready to promote the good of all the schools as well 
as to do what narrowly concerned their own. The labor of re- 
vising our list of readers and selecting supplemental reading and 
reference books, mainly done by them, has consumed much time. 

To say our schools have been successful in the sense of running 
smoothly and with common approval is matter of small congrat. 
ulation to us. It is said of schools that bear poor comparison to 
ours in .point of efficiency. If they have not improved upon the 
work of previous years, good as that has been, our hope and that 
of the teachers has failed. 



Scholars who have been neither absent or tardy during the 
year : — Mary Fairbank, Mary Walfram, Eddie Briggs, Edith 
Burns, Ella Baker, Carrie Warner and Emma Smith. 



STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EM- 
PLOYED, &c. 



CENTER GRAMMAR. 



Miss Eunice J. Morton. 



Number of scholars enrolled, 22 

Average membership, 17 

Average attendance, 15 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Number of weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, 1245.00 

CENTER PRIMARY . 

Miss Carrie L. Warner. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 48 

Average membership, 39 

Average attendance, 36 

Number of weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, $245.00 

HILL GRAMMAR. 

Miss Elsie E. Elder. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 25 

Average membership, , 19 

Average attendance, 16 

Number of weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, 8245.00 

30 



31 

HILL PRIM AR Y . 

Miss Mary A. Waite. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 41 

Average membership, 32 

Average attendance, 30 

Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 1 

Number of weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, $245.00 

WEST HATFIELD GRAMMAR. 

Miss Carrie S. Porter. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 28 

Average membership, 22 

Average attendance, 20 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 
Amount paid as wages, $245.00 

WEST HATFIELD PRIMARY. 

Miss Gertrude A. Strong. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 34 

Average membership, 30 

Average attendance, 26 

Number of weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, $223.00 

WEST BROOK. 

Miss Kate Wells. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 38 

Average membership, " 30 

Average attendance, 23 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

Number of weeks school, 35 
Amount paid as wages, $245 .00 



32 

FARMS. 

Misses Lotta Porter and Hattie A. Carl. 
Number of scholars enrolled, 2 



Average membership, 22 

Average attendance, 22 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Number of weeks school, 35 

Amount paid as wages, $234. CO 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Number of persons between 5 and 15 years, 253 

" " " 8 and 14 years, 158 

" of scholars enrolled, 263 

" " between 5 and 15 years, 254 

" " " 8 and 14 years, 160 

Average membership in all the schools for the year, 211 

Average attendance in all the schools for the year, 188 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 8 

Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 1 



APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 



Balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriated by the town, 
Received from State Fund, " 
" " Dog Fund, 

" " Tuition Northampton, 

" " Over pay of Teacher, 



1 77 


86 


1,700 


00 


217 


33 


85 


84 


50 


00 


5 


60 



$2,136 63 






Amount expended for teachers, $1,927 60 

" " wood and coal, 220 18 

" " care school houses, 128 03 

" " Encyclopedias, 33 75 



$2,310 06 

Expended over receipts, $173.43 

Appropriation for music, $150.00 

Amount paid Prof Charmbury, 150.00 



BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Amount expended for Books and supplies, $250.00 

Estimates of Appropriations required for 1888-89. 

For Schools, $2,000 00 

Books and supplies, 250 00 

Music, 150 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. M. BARTON, ) « ' , 

s. s. dwight, y n fech ? + °; 

GEORGE C. MARSH, \ Committee. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD, 



FOE THE 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1889, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS.: 
GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY. 

1889. 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 18, 1889. 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary Town Officers for the year 
ensuing, including one member of the School Committee for 
three years. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the Will of the late Oli- 
ver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors as submitted 
by the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — The hear the report of the Selectmen, Treasurer, 
and School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on Town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to de- 
fray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the town will adopt for the 
maintenance and repairs of highways and bridges for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the town will take in relation to 
the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the town will raise money to pay the out- 
standing debts of the town. 

Art. 11. — To see if the town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library, and choose a committee for the same. 

Art. 12. — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor for the ensuing year. 

Art. 13. — To see if the town will make an appropriation to 
defray the expenses of celebrating Memorial Day. 



Art. 14.— To take action under Chap. 100, Sec. 5, of the 
Public Statutes, in answer to the question, " Shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town ? " Ail 
ballots shall have the words Yes and No printed on the same 
ballot. In order to ascertain the result of the vote upon said 
question, every such ballot from which the word No is crossed 
out or erased shall be counted as a vote in the affirmative, and 
every such ballot from which the word Yes is so crossed out or 
erased shall be counted as a vote in the negative, but no ballot 
shall be counted as a vote upon the question unless one of the 
said words has been so crossed out or erased therefrom and the 
other remains thereon. 

Art. 15. — To see if the town will pay a bounty for the kill- 
ing of noxious animals and birds. 

Art. 16. — To see if the town will employ a teacher of music 
in the schools. 

Art. 17. — To see if the town will take action in relation to 
the cemeteries of the town. 

Art. 18. — To see if the town will take action in relation to 
rebuilding Hill Bridge so called. 

Art. 19. — To see if the town will appoint an agent to look 
after the interest of individuals in town where the town is likely 
to be held responsible for the support of said persons. 

Art. 20. — To see if the town will do anything to protect the 
river bank from washing at the bridge near the house of Henry 
R. Graves. 

Art. 21. — To see what action the town will take under the 
law of 1888 with reference to a school superintendent. 

Art. 22. — To see if the town will appropriate money for 
special repairs on school houses and the construction of out- 
buildings. 

Art. 23. — To see if the town will take any action on the 
matter of drainage from the dwellings of those living on Chest- 
nut street, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Art. 24. — To take action in relation to a claim the town has 
against Alvin Sanderson and John E. Doane. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield: 

Your Selectmen have finished their duties for another year, 
and find the expenses of the town for the past year to come 
within the appropriations raised at the town meeting last March. 
The roads and bridges are all in good repair except the one at 
Pine Bridge, so called, which will need some repairing ; and the 
Hill Bridge may have to be rebuilt ; also quite a sum is needed 
to repair a washout at Little Ponsett Hill. The roads in the 
other parts of the town are in good repair so far as we can judge. 
We have expended some of the money raised for special repairs 
at West Brook, and the depot road, and the road leading from 
the hill to the depot. 

POOR. 

As recommended by the Board last year, we still , recommend 
a different policy in regard to money expended for the Poor of 
the town. We think if some suitable place could be procured 
by the town and all of the persons supported by the town board- 
ed there together we should be relieved of considerable expense, 
also decreasing the number of tramps to provide lodgings for. 

We are having the following persons boarded in private fami- 
lies ; 



Charles Morton, 


aged 74, 


at $3.00 per week. 


Michael Ryan, 


" 81, 


" 2.00 


Patrick Russell, 


" 62, 


" 2.75 


Joseph Beauregard 


" 81, 


" 2.00 


Letta Wheeler, 


" 9, 


" 1.50 


John Tobin, 


" 7, 
(5) 


" 1.50 



6 

Besides A. M. Richmond at the hospital, Joseph Proux and 
family are being temporarily aided, they living in Northampton. 
And we have been obliged to help the family of Larry Powers 
some, but think they will support themselves soon. Also the 
wife of Daniel Dolon requires some aid. 

The number of tramps provided lodging for the year, 45. 

OLD BILLS, 1888. 

M. H. Burke, repairs on school houses, 
L. Crafts, labor on school house, 
Carlton C. Crafts, labor on highway, 
James Mullen, labor on bridge, 
Horace Shumway, labor on highway, 



$47 40 


2 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


50 


00 



$ 102 90 



FOOT WALK AT HILL BRIDGE. 

Jared Remington, labor on foot walks, 
George Budner, " " " 

E. E. Wood & Son, bolts and spikes, 
A. L. Strong, planks, 
David Billings, stone posts, 
E. Hamnell, iron cable, 



$14 37 


14 


00 


4 


80 


39 


06 


8 


00 


10 


00 



$90 23 



BREAKING ROADS AND SHOVELING SNOW, 
MARCH, 1888. 
John Batzhold, shoveling snow, $6 75 



George Steele, " 


n 


3 00 


John Kiley, 


n 


1 80 


John Steele, " 


a 


2 25 


John May, 


a 


1 65 


George Phiffer, 


a 


5 25 


John Statder, 


a 


2 75 


John Striugline, " 


a 


4 11 


Ernest Gordon, breaking r 


oads, 


3 50 


Frank Newman, shoveling 


snow, 


2 25 


George D. Howe, " 


a 


2 50 


David Powers, " 


a 


4 37 



William' Holder], breaking 


roads, 


0. B. Dickinson, 


t< 


Fred Jubenville, " 


a 


D. W. Wells, 


a 


Henry Balise, " 


a 


Phillip Jubenville, " 


a 


C. H. Waite, Shoveling 


snow, 


John Karin, " 


it 


J. D. Porter, breaking : 


roads, 


F. G. Bard well, 


a 


0. S. Graves, 


tt 


Oscar Belden, " 


a 


Carlton H. Crafts, " 


a 


C. W. Wolfram, 


a 


John McHugh, " 


a 


A. L. Strong, 


a 


H. G. Moore, " 


a 


A. E. Harris, 


a 



$13 


50 


17 


25 


1 


50 


4 


87 


8 


00 


13 


00 




75 


3 


00 


4 00 


5 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


1 


50 


2 


75 


3 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


3 


50 



$133 80 



POOR. 



Mary Wheeler, board of Lotta Wheeler, 
Lewis Murray, board of Patrick Russell, 
John Goodchild, " 
Peter Balise, board of Joseph Beauregard, 
John Karin, board of|Michael Ryan, 
William W. Field, board of Charles Morton, 
N. L. Hospital, board of A. M. Richmond, 
" " " Catherine Tobin, 

T.JBaggs, lodging tramps, 
Fred Jubenville, lodging tramps, 
N. P. Gould, wood for Mrs. Kennedy, 
R. P. Smith, coal 
Albert Marsh, lodging tramps, 
Sisters of Charity, board of John Tobin, 
City of Northampton, support of Daniel 

Dolon and wife, 
City of Northampton, burial of child of 
Joseph Proux, 



$78 00 


49 


35 


93 


25 


104 00 


92 


00 


159 


65 


171 


42 


27 


07 


21 


50 


4 50 


2 


25 


4 


00 


2 


00 


102 


00 


70 


40 


8 


00 



8 



W. M. Lyons for T. Baggs, lodging tramps, 
Joseph Pronx, care of Frank Ballou, 
T. A. Orcutt, funeral expenses Frank Ballon, 
Graves Bros., team for Joseph Proux, 
W. H. Dickinson, house rent Mary E. Waite, 
Mrs. Lamprow, lodging tramps, 
0. M. Barton, medical attendance on poor 
for the years 1886-87-88, 



To be paid by the town of Wenham : 
For Mrs. Dodge, support, cash, 
W. H. Dickinson, house rent, 
N. P. Gould, wood, 



$14 00 


23 


00 


14 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 




50 


73 


60 


$50 00 


32 


00 


2 


25 



$1,126 79 



$84 25 



To be paid by the State : 

Support of E. P. Clark, 76 00 



$1,287 04 
To be paid by the State for support of Daniel Dolon, 35 20 

STATE AID. 

Mrs. Oovill, $24 00 

Mrs. Anderson, 24 00 

— $48 00 



SEATS FOR SCHOOL HOUSES AT WEST HATFIELD 
AND WEST BROOK. 

Winchester Furniture Co., desks and fixtures,$176 30 
Conn. R. R. R. Co., for freight, 
American Express Co., expressage, 
Joseph Hebert, lumber, 
P. M. Wells, labor and drawing desks, 
Frank Cutter, carting and placing desks. 
John Statder, labor West Hatfield and West 
Brook, 

$211 30 



7 


35 




65 


12 


00 


4 


00 


2 25 


8 


75 



SCHOOL BOOKS. 

S. E. Bridgman, encyclopedias, $33 75 

American Express Co., expressage, 75 

Leach & Sewell, books, 9 72 

S. E. Bridgman, " 110 40 

King & Merrill, blank books, 39 96 

Ginn & Co., text books, 1 88 

S. E. Bridgman, school books, 90 03 



SCHOOLS. 

Carrie L. Warner, teaching, $247 00 

Eunice J. Morton, " 73 00 

Elsie E.Elder, " 63 00 

Mary L. Waite, " 143 00 

Kosella E. Clark, " 217 00 

Lizzie D. Porter, " 186*00 

Kate Wells, " 217 00 

Hattie A. Carl, " 199 00 

Grace B. Marsh, " 132 00 

Martha P. Swinerton, " 132 00 

Seraph M. Loomis, " 84 00 

George E. Barton, janitor, 6 50 

Eddie Breor, " 5 00 

Oscar E. Belden, " 5 35 
David Powers,drawingwood and coal, W. BrooklO 50 

E. M. Martin, coal W. Farms and W. Brook, 40 60 
Willie Burke, janitor, 3 50 
Mrs. Videmyre, " 4 75 
John Manchester, " 2 25 
R. P. Smith, coal, 112 65 

F. G. Bard well, wood, 20 25 
Mrs. Michael Barry, janitor, 2 50 
Horace Sbumway, drawing coal, 2 15 
John E. Doane, wood, 4 25 

G. F. Cutter, drawing and sawing wood, 3 00 
L. C. Clark, wood and sawing, 7 88 
Harry Howard, janitor, 9 75 
Homer Eabboin, " 9 75 

2 



$286 49 



10 



Henry Wolfram, " 

Sarah McHugh, sweeping, Center, 

Hattie Kingsley, " Hill, 

Mrs. Henry Videmyre, sweeping, W. Brooks, 

Morris Powers, janitor, Farms, 

Mrs. Smith, janitor, West Hatfield, 

Harry Howard, sawing wood, 

Homer Rabboin, " " 

David Powers, drawing wood, 



$6 50 


7 50 


7 50 


3 25 


9 75 


23 25 


2 00 


2 00 


4 00 



$1,999 38 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 



John Statder, labor, 

E. E. Wood & Son, supplies, 

T. Baggs, brick, 

Charles H. Jones, door and Sash, 

L. H. Faber, cleaning and repairing clocks, 

Mrs, Thomas Fitzgerald, cleaning, 

Edgar P. Lyman, labor, repairing, 

Milton Bradley & Co., school utensils, 

M. C. Howard, paint and material, 

Betsy Videmyre, sweeping, 

Mrs. Joseph Rabboin, " 

G. E. Barton, cleaning, Center, 

Sarah McHugh, " 

Hattie Kingsley, " Hill, 

Mrs. Michael Barry, cleaning W. Farms, 

George S. Perry, school supplies, 

Eames & Sprague, school supplies, 

P. L. Hammett, material for black boards, 

Warner & Dibble, repairs on stoves, 

Shu m way & Riley, repairs and slating, 

J. H. Howard, school supplies, 

Mrs. Smith, cleaning, 

C. M. Barton, cash paid for sundries, , 

E. M. Martin, school supplies, 

I. R. Clark, school supplies, 



$24 50 


16 


03 


4 67 


6 


38 


5 87 


5 


00 


23 


83 


2 


77 


12 


82 


3 


10 


2 


50 


5 


00 


4 


50 


4 50 


2 


25 


4 


80 


1 


13 


23 


40 


28 


29 


33 


42 


6 


73 


5 


00 


19 


61 


2 


73 


10 27 



$259 10 



11 



HIGHWAYS— Hill District. 



C. L. Graves, 




$72 37 


Moses Kingsley, 




4 00 


H. S. Hubbard, 




17 31 


James Porter, 




6 50 


C. L. Warner, * 




14 70 


L. S. Dyer, 




9 75 


Charles Kingsley, 




6 25 


W. M. Jones, 




45 28 


B. M. Warner, 




12 01 


John Smith, 




2 50 


Frederick Wagner, 




2 25 


Horace Shumway, 




32 00 


Thaddeus Graves, 




15 65 


J. D. Porter, labor 


and money paid, 


4 50 


A. H. Graves, 




19 .04 


Lewis Rabboin, 




18 50 



$282 Ql 



HIGHWAYS— West Brook. 



F. 0. Crafts, 
L. C. Crafts, earth, 
Carlton H. Crafts, 
A. Crafts, 
W. Wenzell, 
George Anderson, 
D wight Morton, 
C. Carson, 
W. Holden, 
J. T. Fitzgibbons, 
F. G. Bardwell, 
P. Jubenville, 
John Karin, 
George Phifer, 
Morris Fitzgibbons, 
F. C. Crafts, 



$19 


25 


22 


00 


14 


00 


4 


50 


4 


50 


3 


00 


7 


50 


4 50 


7 


00 


12 


25 


19 


50 


15 


00 


3 


00 


4 


50 


2 


50 


14 


75 



$157 75 



12 

HIGHWAYS— South Center. 

D. W. Wells, labor, $120 36 

Nicholas Powers, labor, 3 75 



HIGHWAYS- 


—North Center; 


Frederick Carl, 


$103 74 


Edwin Brainard, 


20 11 


Mert. Hamnel, A. Ferry, 


16 95 


John McHugh, 


3 62 


James Breor, 


5 00 


W. H. Dickinson, 


3 82 


HIGHWAYS- 


-North Hatfield. 


0. S. Graves, 


$55 16 


E. F. Cooley, 


11 76 


H. G. Moore, 


11 25 


E. W. Field, labor and earth, 


14 46 


F. Moshier, 


1 00 


Charles Waite, 


1 76 


Oscar Belden, 


3 25 


Charles Bartlett, 


9 75 


H. H. Field, 


3 25 


A. S. Jones & Sons, 


11 62 


David Powers, 


2 50 



HIGHWAYS— West Hatfield. 



Peter Saffa, labor, 


$128 61 


" " special, 


34 78 


John Danenlin, special, 


16 00 


G. A. Cutter, labor, 


3 00 


Peter Saffa, blasting and drawing stone, 


11 55 



$124 11 



$152 94 



$125 76 



$193 94 



13 




BRIDGES. 




Jeseph Murray, labor on bridges, 


$17 00 


Peter Saffa, 


17 06 


A. L. Strong, plank and lumber, 


60 31 


H. G. Moore, plank, 


9 84 


Horace Shumway, lumber, 


41 05 


0. S. Graves, lumber, 


8 00 



$153 26 

REPAIRS ON HALLS. 
M. H. Burke, $50 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Hubbard & Taber, binding books, 

J. H. Sanderson, services as librarian, 

E. F. Billings, book for library, 

S. E. Bridgman, books, 

Dearden & Noble, lamps and chimneys, 

R. M. Woods, books, 

W. D. Billings, labor, 

Horace Shumway, expressage, 



$63 00 


57 70 


2 90 


101 57 


9 23 


4 00 


6 00 


5 60 



$250 00 



MUSIC IN SCHOOLS. 
Prof. Thomas Charmburg, teacher music, $150 00 

MEMORIAL DAY. 
A. L. Strong, $50 00 

TOWN OFFICERS, 1887. 

Moses E. Warner, services as Selectman, $50 00 

Charles A. Jones, " <• 50 00 

Jonathan D. Porter, " " 125 00 

W. C. Dickinson, services as Treasurer, 100 00 

C. B. Dickinson, Collector of Taxes, 97 00 

$422 00 



14 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1888. 

John Fitzgibbons, services as Assessor, $55 00 

0. L. Warner, " " 26 25 

W. D. Billings, " " 75 00 
W. D. Billings, Town Clerk and Registrar of 

Voters, 75 00 
W. D. Billings, recording births, marriages 

and deaths, 17 55 

W. D. Billings, services as Constable, 3 00 

D. W. Wells, services as Elector, 10 00 

C. M. Barton, services as School Committee, 125 00 



5 


50 


3 


25 


6 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


5 


50 



MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT. 

J. D. Porter, expenses to Holyoke, pauper case, $4 85 
" " repairs on Town Hall, 6 00 

" " order book, postage stamps and 

stationery, 
Dane Kingsley, tending ferry, 
A. M. Peck, stools and rubber cloth, 
W. H. Dickinson, V. I. Society, 
L. S. Crafts, care of water trough 1887-88, 
^N. P. Gould, labor at the old cemetery, 
Wade, Warner & Co., printing reports and 

ballots, 36 20 

W. D. Billings, Henry Childs for record books, 5 00 
A. L. Strong, wood for Town Hall, 5 00 

Edgar P. Lyman, repairs on Town Hall and 

Hearse House, 
Horace Fitzgibbons, care of water trough, 
A. M. Peck, recording deaths, 
W. G. Bassett, legal services N. H. & N. R. R.,35 
C. D. Bardwell, services as janitor Town Hall 

and extra work, 
W. D. Billings, postage, 
W. M. Dougherty, painting guide boards, 
S. P. Billings, services for the town, 
J. D. Porter, spikes, 



12 


95 


2 


50 


5 


50 


,35 


98 


22 


50 


2 


00 


3 


75 


11 


00 


6 


12 



$386 80 



16 



J. H. Howard, nails and spikes, &4 5l 

Ernest Gason, wood for town hall. 18 00 
Charles K. Morton, services as committee on 

railroads, 25 00 



Respectfully submitted, 



1337 11 



JONATHAN D. PORTER, ) Selectmen 
CHARLES A. JONES, [ of 

MOSES E. WARNER, ) Hatfield. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen for the year 
ending March 1, 1889, and have found them correct, with 
proper vouchers on file for all warrants drawn, amounting to 
seven thousand two hundred fifty-four dollars and sixty-two 
cents ($7,254.62). 



D. W. WELLS, Auditor. 



Hatfield, March 4, 1888. 



16 



APPROPRIATIONS TOWN OF HATFIELD, 1888. 

Highways and Bridges, $1,500 00 

Schools, 1,700 00 

Poor, 1,200 00 

Contingencies, 500 00 

Town Officers, 900 00 

Interest, 200 00 

School Books, 235 00 

Public Library, 250 00 

Town Debt, * 1,000 00 

Music, 150 00 

Cemeteries, 100 00 

Memorial Day, 50 00 

Foot Walks, 60 00 

Seats for School Houses, 230 00 

Repairs on Halls, 50 00 



$8,125 00 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 

The following is the List of Jurors reported by the Selectmen 
for the acceptance of the town for the year 1889 : 

W. B. Langdon, Charles W. Marsh, Edward Sheehan, B. M. 
Warner, Thomas Nolan, E. M. Martin, John T. Fitzgibbons, 
Lewis A. Billings, Arthur F. Curtis, E. B. Dickinson, Cooley 
B. Dickinson, Frank H. Porter, Silas S. Dwight, Fred H. 
Bardwell, John H. Sanderson, Henry G. Moore, Henry Wade, 
David Billings, W. H. Dickinson, Matthew J. Ryan. 



Treasurer's Report, 



W. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, in account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 



Cr. 



By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $7,254 62 

State Tax, 1,215 00 

County Tax, 1,490 14 

Interest on Notes, 186 24 



$10,146 00 



BY CASH PAID ON PERMANENT LOANS. 



Hampshire Savings Bank, $1,500 00 

" " " 500 00 

$2,000 00 

BY CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 



it 


tt 


tt 


a 


tt 


a 


tt 


it 


tt 


tt 


it 


it 



S500 


00 








500 


00 








500 


00 








500 


00 








500 


00 












$*, 


500 


00 




< 




*14, 


646 


00 



(1?) 



18 



Dr. 

To balance from old account, $602 21 

Cash rec'd from Cooley B. Dickinson, coll'r, 8,787 77 
National Bank Tax, 1,642 33 

Corporation Tax, 309 40 

School Fund, 208 03 

Support of State Paupers, 108 43 
Dog Fund, 89 75 

Smith Charities Tax, 57 25 

City of Northampton, tuition, 55 25 
State Aid, 48 00 

C. D. Bardwell, 22 50 

Memorial Day appropriation, 12 10 
Town of Wenham, support 

of Mrs. Dodge, 84 25 



TO CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS 

Hampshire Savings Bank, 



(X 


tt 


ft 


tt 


ct 


ft 


tt 


tt 


it 


tt 


tt 


- tt 



Balance due the Treasurer, 



$11,425 06 

T LOANS. 


£00 


00 




500 00 




500 


00 




500 


00 




500 


00 


$2,500 00 








t 


118 73 




&14,646 00 



In account with Cooley B. Dickinson, Collector. 

Or. 

By balance uncollected taxes, 1887-8, § 368 33 

Assessors' Warrant, 1888-89, 9,079 74 

Interest on taxes, 27 55 

$9,475 62 



19 
Dr. 



To cash received, 

Discount on taxes, 
Orders of abatement, 
Balance uncollected taxes, 


$8,787 77 

240 71 

25 66 

421 48 


$9,475 62 

$479 74 
118 73 


SUMMARY. 

Uncollected taxes, 

Due from 0. D. Bardwell, 


$421 48 
58 26 


Due the Treasurer, 





Balance in favor of the town, $361 01 



1 have this day examined the books of the Treasurer and find 
them correctly cast and properly vouched, and that there is due 
the Treasurer one hundred eighteen and seventy-three one- 
hundredths dollars. 

D. W. WELLS, Auditor. 

Hatfield, March 4, 1889. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield, for the year 1888, 
are as follows : — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 





NO. 


MALES. 


FEMALES, 


January, 

February, 

March, 




1 
2 






2 



1 



April, 
May, 

June, 


3 

2 
1 


1 

2 



2 

1 


July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 


2 
3 
3 

2 


1 
1 
3 



1 

2 

2 


November, 


1 





1 


December, 


2 


1 


1 



Total, 



22 



11 



11 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS. 





FATHER. 


MOTHER. 


Born in United States, 


16 


17 


" Canada, 


4 


4 


" Ireland, 


1 


1 


" England, 


1 





22 



(20) 



22 



21 

Births for the five previous years : 

1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 

27 33 32 39 30 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 



April, 

May, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Total, 

First marriage of both parties, 
First marriage of bride, 
Second marriage of groom, 
Second marriage of bride, 
Third marriage of groom, 
Age of oldest bride, 
Age of youngest bride, 
Age of oldest groom, 
Age of youngest groom, 



5 
1 
1 
1 
1 

60 years. 

19 " 

60 " 

23 " 



BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 



Born in United States, 
" Ireland, 
" Geimany, 



BRIDE. 
6 
1 



GROOM. 
5 
1 
1 



Number of certificates of marriages issued from this office, 
Marriages recorded for the five previous years : 



883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 


7 


10 


9 


5 


6 



22 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 

NO. 

January, 2 

February, 3 

March, 2 

April, 3 

May, 2 

June, 1 

July, 1 

August, 1 

September, 1 

October, 

November, 2 

December, 4 

Total, 22 



Under 5 years of age, 
Between 5 and 10, 
10 and 20, 
20 and 30, 
" 40 and 50, 
50 and 60, 
60 and 70, 
70 and 80, 
80 and 90, 



MALES 


;. 


FEMALES, 


1 




1 


2 




1 


2 







2 




1 


1 




1 


1 












1 







1 


1 















2 







2 




2 


14 




8 


MALES. 


FEMALES. 




1 


3 












1 







1 










1 




2 


1 




3 


1 




5 


2 




1 






14 
Age of oldest person deceased, 85 years. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Born in United States, 
" Ireland, 



Deaths for the five preceeding years : 
1883 1884 1885 

29 22 24 



MALES. 
11 


FEMALES. 

7 


3 


1 



14 

1886 
24 



1887 
20 



23 

Causes of death classified according to the nomenclature 
adopted by the State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Diphtheria 1 

Disease of Heart, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Cancer, 2 

Mortification, 1 

Phthisis (Consumption of Lungs), 4 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Apoplexy, 4 

Convulsions, 1 

Pneumonia, 1 

Peritonitis, 1 

Hernia, 1 

Nephria (Brights Disease), 2 

Bronchitis, 1 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 

Infantile Debility, 1 

Still-born, 1 

DOGS. 

The number of Dogs licensed during the year ending Nov. 30, 
1888, with the receipts and settlement of the account with the 
County Treasurer, is as follows : 

EECEIPTS. 

60 male dogs, at $2.00 each, $120 00 

3 female dogs, at $5.00 each, 15 00 

$135 00 

Less fees, 63 dogs at 20 cents each, 12 60 

$122 40 
Paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, $122 40 



24 

Amount paid the County Treasurer on this account for the 
five previous years : 

1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 

$80.40 $72.00 $92.40 $101.40 $101.40 

There have been recorded in the Town Clerk's office from 
March 1st, 1888, to March 1st, 1889, eight mortgages of per- 
sonal property. All other papers, two. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



1F& IS IP O 2E& IP 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The schools have suffered considerably from the loss of effi- 
cient and experienced teachers. The loss of such teachers is a 
serious one, when we consider that not more than one in ten 
who attempt teaching is gifted to teach well, and even a natur- 
ally gifted teacher requires six or eight years' experience to ma- 
ture her. [Springfield allows its teachers to reach the maximum 
salary in eight years.] In the interest of the town, it is 
certain that trained and talented teachers ought not to be al- 
lowed to leave our schools on account of pay. A just discrimi- 
nation on the part of the committee would give that rank to 
but few, and these could be made useful beyond their own 
schools to all the teachers and schools in town. 

The course of study mentioned in last year's report has been 
used and more or less closely conformed to in all the schools. It 
has served to show beginners how far pupils had progressed, 
what was before them, how much they ought to accomplish, and 
in what order subjects should be taken up. Stricter conformity 
to it would prevent teachers from pushing some favorite study 
or a favorite class to the neglect of others, a fault still some- 
times seen in our schools. 

4 (25) 



26 

The law of 1888 provides that two or more towns may unite 
in employing a superintendent of schools. The towns so unit- 
ing must have together not more than fifty nor less than thirty 
schools, and the valuation of each town must not exceed $2,500- 
000. The law also provides that $1,000 shall be paid by the 
State to the towns so uniting, at the end of each year in which 
they have maintained a school superintendent ; of which $500 
shall go towards the salary of the superintendent and $500 to- 
wards salaries of teachers, provided, however, the towns together 
have raised $750 for salary of superintendent and each town has 
raised for schools an amount equal to the average amount raised 
by that town during the three years next preceding. 

Should Hatfield unite with Williamsburg and Hadley to form 
a superintendent district, its share of the $750 to be raised for 
superintendent's salary would be about $170, and it would re- 
ceive of the $500 to go towards teachers' salaries, $113. Thus 
the town would actually raise but $170 more than it now does, 
and $113, or all but $57 r would go to lengthen its schools. 

Williamsburg and Hadley seem convenient towns with which 
to unite, and some correspondence has been had with their com- 
mittees, who express themselves favorable to it. 

The need of such superintendence is apparent, and its benefits 
would be immediate and emphatic. " The duties of selecting and 
examining teachers, of arranging courses of study, of directing 
methods of instruction and school government, of providing 
proper means of teaching and study, and inspecting schools with 
reference to their management and progress," certainly cannot 
be well performed by an improvised school committee, devoting 
most of their time and thought to other matters. 

A special appropriation will be needed for outbuildings at the 
Center, West Hatfield, and West Brook, to make these accommo- 
dations conform to the suggestions of the agent of the State 
Board of Education. 



27 

STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EM- 
PLOYED, &c. 

CENTER — GRAMMAR. 

Eunice J. Morton, Grace B. Marsh. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 31 

Average membership, . 22 

Average attendance, 20 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $195 

CENTER — PRIMARY. 

Carrie L. Warner. 

Number of scholars enrolled, . 42 

Average membership, 39 

Average attendance, 35 

Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 1 

Number of weeks school, 32 

Amount paid as wages, $247 

HILL — GRAMMAR., 

Elsie E. Elder, Mary L. Waite, Seraph M. Loomis. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 13 

Average membership, 14 

Average attendance, 12 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $227 

HILL — PRIMARY. 

Mary L. Waite, Martha P. Swinerton. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 49 

Average membership. 33 

Average attendance, 27 

Number of weeks school, 31 

x\mount paid as wages, $195 



28 

WEST HATFIELD— GE A MMAR. 

Rosella E. Clark. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 33 

Average attendance, 29 

Average membership, 26 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $217 

WEST HATFIELD — PRIMARY. 

Lizzie D. Porter. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 29 

Average membership, 26 

Average attendance, 24 
Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $186 

WEST BROOK. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 36 

Average membership, 28 

Average attendance, 25 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $217 

FARMS. 

Hattie A. Carl. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 31 

Average membership, 25 

Average attendance, 23 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 2 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $199 



29 
SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Number of persons between 5 and 15 years, 239 

" " " 8 and 14 years, 149 

" scholars enrolled, 264 

st " between 5 and 15 years, 251 

" " " 8 and 14 years, 156 

Average membership in all the schools, 216 

Average attendance in all the schools, 192 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 10 

Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 3 

APPKOPRIATIONS AND EECEIPTS. 



Appropriated by the town, 




$1,700 00 




Keceived from State Fund, 




208 03 




" " Dog Fund, 




89 75 




" Tuitions, Nor 


thampton, 


55 25 


$2,053 03 






EXPENDITURES CHARGEABLE TO 


SCHOOL MONEY. 


Amount of teachers' wages, 




$1,683 00 




Expended for fuel, 




209 63 




" •* care of houses, 




118 95 




" " encyclopedias, 




33 75 


$2,045 33 






Balance unexpended, 






$7 70 


Appropriated for music, 




$150 00 




Expended for music, 




150 00 




Appropriated for books and t 


supplies, 


$235 00 




Expended " " 


a 


260 06 





Expenditure over appropriation, $25 06 

Appropriated for seats at West Hatfield and 

West Brook, $230 00 
Expended for seats, 210 90 

Balance unexpended, $19 10 



30 
EXPENDED FOR REPAIRS. 



Repairs of blackboards : 
Liquid slating, 
Labor, 



Less slating unused, 

Cleaning houses : 
Center, 
Hill, 

.West Hatfield, 
West Brook, 
Farms, 

Calcimining two rooms at West Hatfield, 

Repair of clocks, 

Repair of slate roofs, etc., 

Repair of stoves and pipes, etc., 

Door and transom window, 

Supplies for repairs : 
E. M. Martin, 
J. H. Howard, 
I. R. Clark, 
E. E. Wood, 
Miscellaneous, 

Labor : 

John Statder, 
E. P. Lyman, 

Old Bills : 

Theodore Baggs, 
Eames and Sprague, 

Total for repairs, etc, $225 21 



$23 05 




13 25 




36 30 




8 64— 


$27 66 


$5 00 




5 00 




5 00 




2 50 




2 50— 


$20 00 




$12 82 




5 87 




33 42 




28 10 




6 38 


$2 73 




6 73 




10 27 




16 03 




18 82— 


$54 58 


$ 8 75 




21 83— 


$30 58 


$4 67 




1 13— 


$5 80 



31 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENDITURES FOR 1889-90; 



For Schools, for 35 weeks, 

a a a o^ (( 

Books and Supplies, 
Music Teacher, 
Music Books, 



C. M. BARTON, 
GEORGE C. MARSH, 
S. S. DWIGHT, 



$2,000 00 

1,700 00 

250 00 

150 00 

50 00 

School 
Committee. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICEKS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield, 



For the Year Ending larch 1st, 1890. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. I 

WADE, WARNER & CO., Printers. 

1890. 



ARTICLES IN THE WARRANT FOR TOWN 
MEETING, MARCH 17, 1890. 



Article 1. — To choose a moderator to preside in said meeting. 

Art. 2. — To choose all necessary Town officers for the ensuing 
year, including three members of the School Committe, one each 
for one, two and three years. 

Art. 3. — To choose an Elector under the Will of the late 
Oliver Smith, Esq. 

Art. 4. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors submitted by 
the Selectmen. 

Art. 5. — To hear the reports of the Selectmen, Treasurer 
and School Committee, and act thereon. 

Art. 6. — To receive and pass on Town accounts. 

Art. 7. — To take action in relation to raising money to defray 
the expenses of the Town for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. — To see what method the Town will adopt for the 
maintenance and repairs of highways and bridges for the ensuing- 
year. 

Art. 9. — To see what action the Town will take in relation to 
prompt payment of taxes tor the ensuing year. 

Art. 10. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation for 
the Public Library, and choose a committee for the same. 

Art. 11. — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor for the ensuing year. 

Art. 12. — To see if the Town will appropriate money to 
defray the expenses of celebrating "Memorial Day." 



Art. 13. — To take action under Chap. 100, Sec. 5 of the Public 
Statutes. The vote must be by separate ballot, Yes or No, 
in answer to the question, " Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of Intoxicating Liquors in this town ?" 

Art. 14. — To see if the Town will employ a Teacher of Music 
in the schools. 

Art. 15. — To see if the Town will take action in relation to 
the care of the cemeteries in Town. 

. Art. 16. — To see if the Town will take action under the law 
of 1888, relating to a School Superintendent. 

Art. 17. — To see if the Town will appropriate money for 
special repairs on school houses. 

Art. 18. — To see what action the Town will take under Chap. 
37, Sec. 4, of Public Statutes, in relation to providing a fire- 
proof safe or compartment, for the preservation of books and 
records of the Town. 

Art. 19. — To see if the Town will take action in relation to 
the copying of Town records. 

Art. 20. — To see if the Town will take action in relation to 
draining water from highway on School street and Whately 
road. 

Art. 21. — =To, see if the Town will provide a public watering 
trough on JVlain street. 

Art. 22. — To see if the Town will take action in relation to 
having the highways, or portions of them, surveyed, and perma- 
nent boundaries fixed by County Commissioners, or otherwise, as 
the Town may direct. 

Art. 23. — To see ii the Town will take any action in relation 
to sidewalks. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield : 

Your Selectmen respectfully submit the following report of 
the expenditures of this Town for the year past. 

Our roads are in ordinary repair, though we would recom- 
mend some special repairs, hardening, draining, <fcc, in various 
places. 

One of the dry bridges, near Edmund Powers, will have to 
be rebuilt. Pine bridge will need quite extensive repairs. Other 
bridges, as far as we know, will need only ordinary repairs. 

POOR. 

We have the following persons boarded in families : 

Charles Morton, at 13.00 per week. 
Michael Kyan, at $2.00 per week. 
Patrick Russell, at $2.75 per week. 
Joseph Beauregard, at $2.00 per wfiek. 
Letta Wheeler, at $1.50 per week. 

We have at the Northampton Lunatic Hospital A. M. Rich- 
mond, Irving Richmond, and Fred. L. Mosher, a gain of two 
since last year's report. 

Tramps have been quite numerous during the year, we having 
provided for 233, at an expense to the Town of $112.57, as you 
will see by report. We are in hopes for "better thin 
the present arrangement. 



»"> 



ier 



6 
OLD BILLS. 

Charles Marsh, shoveling snow 1888, $ 1 25 

John Merrick, " " " 

A. E. Harris, " " " 

Mrs. S. R. Wight, « 

John J. Regan, " " " 

Dennis Regan, " " " 

Enrotas Morton, labor on highway 1888, 

E. S. Warner, " " " 

John B. Ryan, " " " 

M. E. Warner, timber and labor, 1888, 

Marcus Morton, administrator C. E. Waite's 

estate, sand, highway, 
Emma Alt, care of Mrs. Holdfelder, 
J. S. Deinlein, " " " 

Theo. Baggs, keeping tramps. 
E. M. Martin, goods to Chas. Morton, 



POOR. 

John Karin, board of Michael Ryan, $ 120 86 

John Goodehild, board of Pat. Russell, 141 00 

C. M Barton, medical attendance P. Russell, 1 00 

Peter Beloise, board of Jos. Beauregard, 104 00 

W. W. Field, board of Charles Morton, 156 00 

Mary Wheeler, board of Lotta, 78 00 

Sisters of Charity, board of John Tobin, 18 00 

N. L. Hospital, board of A. M. Richmond, 169 46 

" " " Irving Richmond, 114 67 

" " " Fred Mosher, 40 86 
City of Northampton, aid to D. Doolan and 

wife, 84 00 

City of Northampton, aid to L. Powers family, 102 33 

W. H. Dickinson, rent, Mrs. Dodge, 48 00 

E. M. Martin, goods to Chas. Morton, 2 80 

John Wenzel, keeping tramps, 95 50 



1 


06 




75 


3 


75 


2 


25 


17 


12 


13 


12 


3 


00 


20 


06 


5 

4 


00 


14 


29 


3 


75 


9 


00 


3 


50 



98 40 



Theo. Bagg, keeping tramps, $3 00 

Jared Remington, keeping tramps, 9 50 

J. H. Howard, crackers to tramps, 4 07 

E. Goodwin, wood to tramps, 1 50 

J. H. Howard, groceries to Patricks family, 25 16 

J. H. Howard, groceries to Barbara Cotz, 8 53 

W. J. Lyons, meat to Patricks family, 1 92 

W. W. Gore, " " " 6 15 

E. Goodin, wood, " " 3 00 

H. Shumway, wood, « " 10 00 

Jared Remington, sawing wood, 6 25 

C. M. Barton, medical attendance, Patricks, 2 00 



To be paid by Town of Wenham, 


$ 48 00 


State, Patricks family, 


54 48 


State, Doolan, 


42 00 


* 


1 144 48 


STATE AID. 




Mrs. Covill, 


$ 24 00 


Mrs. Anderson, 


24 00 



$ 1,357 56 



SCHOOLS. 

Alberta Pierce, teaching, $ 217 00 

Seraph M. Loomis, " 217 00 

Mary L. Waite, " 248 00 

Grace E. Webber, " 197 00 

Martha P. Swinerton, teaching, 54 00 

Rosella E. Clark, " 217 00 

Lizzie D. Porter, " 217 00 

Hattie Carl, " 63 00 

Augusta Richardson, " 154 00 

Carrie L. Warner, " 176 00 

Oscar Belden, janitor, . 7 90 

Henry Videmayer, janitor, 2 50 



$ 48 00 



Arthur Ritchmeyer, janitor, 

Elisha Hubbard, Jr., " 

Homer Raboin, " 

Jos. Schepp, " 

Willie Burke, 

Morris Powers, " 

Mrs. John Smith, sweeping and cleaning, 

Sarah McHugh, sweeping, 

Sarah McHugh, cleaning, 

Hattie Kingsley, sweeping, 

Augusta Richardson, sweeping, 

Edith Howard, sweeping, 

Mrs. John Jendron, cleaning, 

Mrs. Vielemeyer, " 

Kittie Dea, sweeping, 

Geo. Steele, pawing wood, 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



$1 


15 


9 


00 


5 


00 


11 


25 


7 


50 


3 


00 


23 


25 


7 


50 


5 


50 


15 


50 


5 


50 


2 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 




S 1.883 05 



R. P. Smith, coal, 1888, 


$ 51 78 


H. C. Hammond, supplies, 


22 50 


S. S. Dwight, coal, 


126 75 


E. M. Martin, coal, 


23 85 


E. E. Wood & Son, supplies, 


4 00 


S. S. Dwight supplies, 


8 15 


C. M. -Barton, supplies and postage, 


9 76 


F. G. Bardwell, wood, 


5 25 


Alfred Harris, " 


16 00 


J. H. Howard, brooms, 


2 00 



$ 270 04 



SCHOOL BOOKS. 



H. C. Hammond, 

Harper Bros, 

A. C. Stockin, 

S. E. Bridgman & Co., 



1,22 50 


53 


84 


8 


10 


37 


23 



$ 121 6" 



9 
SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS. 



A. L. Strong, lumber, 


$ 9 


65 






F. J. Saffer, labor and material, 


35 


95 






John McKenna, labor and material, 


6 


50 






S. W. Kingsley, labor, 


1 


35 






W. B. Langdon, " 


16 


70 






E. M. Martin, nails, 




75 






E. E. Wood & Son, merchandise, 


13 


73 






Shumway & Riley, staves, 


14 


51 






L. A. Tabor, clocks, 


5 


00 


$ 


104 14 


OUTBUILDINGS. 






F. J. Saffer, 


$ 100 


00 


$ 


100 00 



MUSIC. 

Thomas Charmbry, $ 150 00 



$ 150 00 



MEMORIAL DAY. 

J. E. Doane, committee, $ 50 00 



$- 50 00 



CEMETERIES. 



W. H. Dickinson, treas. V. I. Society, 


$ 100 00 


$ 100 00 


LIBRARY. 




Henry Childs, binding books, 


$ 66 95 




R. M. Woods, books and lumber, 


14 52 




J. H. Sanderson, librarian, 1888-89, 


67 30 




" " cleaning, &c, 


7 75 




E. F. Billings, books, 

2 


6 00 . 





10 



S. E. Bridgman & Co., books, 

W. D. Billings, cataloguing books, 

Mt. Tom Printing Co., cards, 

E. Goodin, wood and sawing, 

J. H. Howard, kerosene oil &c, 1888-89, 



HILL BRIDGE. 

A. L. Strong, lumber, 

D. W. Wells, boards, 
G. Yollanger, labor, 
M. Hayes, " 
John Shechan, " 

E. S. Warner and man, labor, 
Michael Boyle, labor, 

M. E. Warner, " 
James Mullens, " 
Joseph Murray, labor and tools, 

A. L. Strong, lumber for bridge on Depot 

Road, 
H. Shumway,*plank for bridges, 



f>70 
6 


09 
00 


2 


25 


5 


50 


6 


74 



$ 253 10 



1 100 60 




1 33 




5 25 




3 00 




8 00 




12 00 




3 00 




3 50 




1 50 




6 00 






$ 139 18 


1 4 23 


37 06 





* 41 29 



FILLING BRIDGE ON DEPOT ROAD. 



J. Carl, man and team, 

M. E. Warner, man and team, 

E. S. Warner, " " " 

J. B. Ryan, 

James Ryan, 

J. J. Ryan, labor, 

M. Boy], labor, 

John Sheehan, 

John McGrath, labor, 

Joseph Stoddard, " 

W. W. Gore, 



Fred Wagner, 



$ 1 


75 


1 


75 


1 


75 


1 


75 


1 


75 




68 




67 




68 




67 




68 




67 


1 


35 



11 

John May, labor, $ gg 

Joseph Smith, '- 57 

Thos McGrath, " 68 

L. Raboin, " (37 

John Kiley, " gg 

John Steinglein, " (37 

I 18 20 



SPECIAL REPAIRS, 


PONSETT HIL 


M. Lamontain, labor, 


$ 2 50 


James Ormon, 


.4 


5 00 


Thomas Sheehan, 


labor, 


7 50 


Charles Kingsley, 


u 


5 00 


John Sheehan, 


u 


10 00 


Thos McGrath, 


u 


7"50 


M. W. Kingsley, 


a 


4 38 


M. Hayes, 


u 


8 13 


Fred Wheeler, 


44 


5 00 


John Kiley, 


44 


4 38 


David Fitzgerald, 


u 


7 50 


John Cooney, 


u 


8 75 


Daniel Cahill, 


a 


3 75 


John McGrath, 


a 


7 50 


R. McGrath, 


a 


6 25 


Dennis Fitzgerald, 


a 


6 50 


William M. Jones, 


team, 


6 50 


Lewis Raboin, 


u 


26 87 


H. S. Hubbard, 


u 


6 50 


Michael Boyl, 


a 


22 25 


John McIIugh, 


u 


24 50 


E. S. Warner, 


u 


19 25 


J. B. Ryan, 


u 


13 00 


J. D. Porter, 


(4 


13 00 


M. E. Warner, 


(4 


26 2b 


B. M. Warner, 


44 


24 88 


Thaddeus Graves, 


sand, 


7 80 


H. G. Maynard, stone, 


6 50 


N. H. St. Railway, 


wheelbarrows, 


6 00 



$ 302 94 



12 
LINSEED ROAD. 



(t. Steele, labor, 
(t. Vollanger, labor, 
Peter Saffer, " 
J. J. Steinglein, labor, 
John May, " 

J. A. Cutter, 
L. Dooppmann, " 
Jos. Newman, " 
F. J. Saffer, 
Johu Yolanger, " 
H. Shumway, " 
A. L. Strong, lumber, 



MAIN STREET. 



$2 75 


18 


12 


32 


5(3 


8 


25' 


1 


37 


10 


37 


3 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 


1 


37 


15 


00 


5 


52 



D. W. Wells, team and labor, 


$5 39 


W. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 


4 03 


John McHugh, " " 


15 93 


Michael Boyle, labor, 


4 05 


John Sheehan, " 


4 05 


George Saffer, " 


1 35 


P. J. Boyle, 


1 35 


E. B. Dickinson, sand and tile, 


6 35 


J. A. Sullivan, tile, 


29 25 



SCHOOL STREET. 

Thomas McGrath, labor, $4 52 

George Steele, " 7 50 

Geo. Volanger, " 7 50 

John McGrath, " 3 82 

J. J. Steinglein, " 2 36 

John Kiley, " 2 35 

John May, « .4 37 

Lewis Raboin, " 2 03 

Jos. Stoddard, " 3 02 



*99 81 



$71 75 



13 



E. S. Warner, team, 

J. B. Ryan, 

Wells & Barnes, " 

M. E. Warner, " 

Michael Proulx, " 

J. Carl, 

Jas. Ryan, " 

S. G. Hubbard, " 

H. Shumway, " • 

John McHugh, " 

Michael Boyle, labor, 

Jos. Smith, " 

W. W. Gore, 

J. J. Ryan, 

John Sheehan, " 

Thomas A. Nolan, labor, 

J. A. Sullivan, tile, 

Porter Machine Works, drills and shar 

$199 32 

WILKIE'S HILL, Gradening and Hardening. 

J. Carl, team, $3 50 

E. S. Warner, team, 

M. E. Warner, team, 

Wells & Barnes, team. 

J. B. Ryan, " 

Michael Proulx, " • 

James Ryan, " 

John Sheehan, labor, 

Michael Boyle, " 

J, J. Ryan, " 

Jos. Smith, " 

Jos. Stoddard, " 

T. A. Nolan, 

John Kiley, " 

J. J. Steinglein, lajbor, 

W. W. Gore, 

m 22 



n 


75 


7 


17 


30 


69 


7 


87 


5 


42 


9 


62 


6 


12 


3 


50 


35 


00 


2 


43 


6 


92 . 


4 


05 


2 


36 


3 


02 


12 


95 


1 


35 


16 


63 


ening, 5 


00 



3 


50 


3 


50 


7 


00 


3 


50 


5 


25 


3 


50 


1 


35 


1 


35 


1 


35 


1 


35 


1 


35 


1 


35 




67 


1 


35 


1 


35 



14 
TUKNPIKING WHATELY ROAD. 

II. Shumway, $34 50 



134 50 



GENERAL REPAIRS HIGHWAYS. 



E. S. Warner, school house hill and foot walk, $8 93 

D. W. Wells, Jericho, 

Trimming trees, etc., Sept. 17, 

B. M. Warner, " " " " « 

E. E. Wood & Son, explosives, 
G. M. Donelson, Doppman crossing, 
N. J. Powers, Farms, 

C. W: Marsh, Farms, 
E. W. Field, soil for Farms highway, 
A. W. Hammel, Ferry road, 
John Deinlein, Railing Depot road, 
T. A. Nolan, Chestnut street, 
Peter Beloise, " " 
John Kiley, " " 
Peter Saffer, wall, river bank, 
J. H. Howard, spikes, etc., 
H. Shumway, 

$150 09 

HIGHWAYS. 

H. Shumway, ordinary repairs, $500 00 

$500 00 



4 


50 


10 


03 


12 


34 


7 


15 


11 


85 


12 


40 


5 


25 


4 


92 


14 


10 


5 


00 


3 


25 


3 


00 




38 


27 


00 


5 


74 


14 


25 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

W. D. Billings, serving warrants, Town meet- 
ings, $24 00 

W . D. Billings, serving Warrants, Dogs, 3 00 

W. D. Billings, Assessor and copying Valua- 
tion Book, 100 00 

W. D. Billings, Town Clerk, and Clerk of 

Board of Registrars, 100 00 



W. D. Billings, recording births, deaths and 

marriages, 
J. D. Porter, Selectman, 
M. E. Warner, " 
C. A. Jones, " 

G. C. Marsh, School Committee, 1888-89, 
S. S. Dwight, " 
C. M. Barton, " 
W. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, 
C. B. Dickinson, Collector, 
J. T. Fitzgibbons, Assessor, 
C. L. Warner, 
C. K. Morton, Elector, 





$20 00 




125 00 




50 00 




50 00 


1888-89, 


25 00 


1888-89, 


62 50 


1889, 


50 00 




100 00 




120 00 




82 50 




45 00 




10 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



American Road Machine Co., edge for Mch., $ 8 00 
C. B. Dickinson, tax bills and book, 9 45 

Oscar Belden, abatement of tax, 8 00 

J. C. Melendy, storage of road machine 2 years, 5 00 

C. P. Daugherty, painting road machine, 18 00 
J. D. Gill, books for Assessors, 6 20 
S. W. Kingsley, repairs ladders, &c, 7 50 
John McHugh, hauling road machine, 1 00 
.1. II. Howard, voting shelves, cartage and 

setting up, 
E. P. Lyman, repairs town hall, 
A. M. Pock, work in cemetery and recording- 
deaths, 
Maurice Fitzgibbons, care watering trough, 
W. L. Smith & Co., chairs and cover for table, 

town hall, 
W. G. Bassett, counsel, Assessors, 

" " opinion on Mayers Tobacco tax. 

Bond & Mason, " '* " " " 

D. Aiken & Son, " " " " « 
W. D. Billings, postage, 
J. II. Howard, " 



15 


00 


2 


10 


8- 


50 


o 


50 


11 


92 


4 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


V 


40 



$967 00 



16 



1 


00 




75 


1 


00 


2 


00 




75 


5 


25 



5 60 



J. II. Howard, expenses to Orange, F. Mosher, $1 95 
" " Tally sheets, 

" " freight and Justice of Peace, 

" " grates for drain, 

" " \V. G. Bassett, counsel R. R. 

crossing, 
John McHugh, guide board, Ferry, 
Wade, Warner & Co., Selectmen's order book, 
S. E. Bridgman & Co., stationery <fcc, to W. D. 

Billings, 1887-88-89, 
C. L. Warner, legal advice and expenses, 

assessors, 
Gazette Printing Co., reports, 
John McHugh, sawing wood, tow T n hall, 
C. D. Bardwell, janitor and sawing wood, 

town hall, 
Frank Lovett, repairs Mrs. Covill's roof, 
S. P. Billings, Justice of Peace, 
F. H. Bardwell, distributing votes on amend- 
ment, 
B. M. Warner, distributing votes on amend- 
ment, 
Dennis McGrath, inspector at election, 
Joseph Mayers Sons, tobacco tax refunded 
H. Shumway. express on books, 

Respectfully submitted, 



10 


00 


82 


00 


1 


50 


19 


75 


1 


00 


3 


00 



1 00 



1 


00 


2 


00 


288 


00 


10 


95 



$ 519 13 



J. H. HOWARD, 
M. E. WARNER, 
C. A. JONES, 



Selectmen 

of Town 

of Hatfield. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen of Hatfield 
for the year ending March 1, 1890, and have found them correct, 
with proper vouchers on file for all warrants drawn, amounting 
to seven thousand six hundred tw T enty dollars and thirty-nine 
cents, ($7,620.39.) 

D. W. WELLS, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 3, 1890. 



17 

APPROPRIATIONS TOWN OF HATFIELD, 1889. 

Highways and Bridges, $1,600 00 

Schools, 1,700 00 

Poor, 1,200 00 

Town Officers, 900 00 

Contingencies, . 500 00 

Interest, 100 00 

School Boo 1 s, 250 00 

Public Library, 250 00 

Music in Schools, 150 00 

Cemeteries, 100 00 

Memorial Day, 50 00 

Sohool House Repairs and Outbuildings, 100 00 

School Superintendent, ,185 28 

Special repairs School street, 200 00 

$7,285 28 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN FOR THE YEAR 1890. 

Fred H. Bardwell, Arthur F. Curtis, 

Charles W. Marsh, E. M. Martin, 

Lewis A. Billings, M. P. Bradford, 

David Billings, M. N. Hubbard, 

Edward B. Dickinson, S. W. Kingsley, 

Win. H. Dickinson, Edwin W. Field, 

Henry G. Moore, Martin Lyons, 

Benjamin M. Warner, George M. Donelson, 

John H. Sanderson, Walter H. Langdon, 

Silas S. Dwight, Samuel P. Billings, 
Edward Sheehan 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Wm. C. Dickinson, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 

Cash rec'd from Cooley B. Dickinson, col., $ 415 58 
Carlton H. Crafts, col., 7,749 15 

National Bank Tax, 1,636 89 

Corporation Tax, 298 29 

Income of School Fund, 209 64 

Dog Fund, 68 54 

State Aid, 48 00 

Support of State Paupers, 35 20 

Town of Whately, tuition, 30 00 
C. D. Bardwell, on account, 19 75 
J. E. Doane, settlement of acct. 15 00 
E. S. Warner, old plank, 3 20 

$10,529 24 

TO cash received from temporary loans. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, $ 1000 00 

1000 00 
1000 00 
1000 00 
$ 4,000 00 



u 


a 


u 


« 


a 


u 


u 


u 


a 



$14, 529 24 



18 



19 

Or. 

By balance due Treasurer from old acct., $ 118 73 

Cash paid Selectmen's orders, 87,620 39 

County Tax, 1,364 93 

State Tax, 960 00 

Interest on notes, 127 99 

$10,073 31 



BY CASH PAID ON TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Hampshire Savings Bank, $ 1000 00 

" *" " 1000 00 

" " " 1000 00 



1000 00 

$ 4,000 00 



Balance in Treasury, . 337 20 



$14,529 24 
in account with cooley b. dickinson, collector. 

Cr. 

By balance uncollected taxes, 1888-89, $ 421 48 

Interest on taxes, 4 10 

$ 425 58 



Dr. 

To cash received, $ 415 58 

Orders of abatement, 10 00 

| 42b 58 

in account with carlton h. crafts, collector. 

Cr. 

By Assessors Warrant, 1889-90, $8,178 80 

Addition to Warrant, 12 40 

Interest on taxes, 29 96 

— $ 8,221 16 



20 
Dr. 



To cash received, 

Orders of abatement, 
Discount on taxes, 
Balance uncollected taxes, 



$7,749 15 

14 96 

111 76 

345 29 



$ 8,221 16 



SUMMARY. 

Cash in Treasury, 

Uncollected Taxes, 

Due from State Board of Charities, 

Town of Wenham, support of Mrs. 

Dodge, 
C. D. Bardwell, 

In favor of the town, 



$ 337 


20 


345 


29 


96 


48 


48 


00 


38 


51 



$ 865 48 



I have this day examined the books of the Treasurer and 
find them correctly cast and properly vouched, and there is a 
balance in the treasury of three hundred thirty-seven 20-100 dol- 
lars. 

D. W. WELLS, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 1, 1890. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



The vital statistics of the Town of Hatfield, for the year 
1889, are as follows : 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



NTO. 


MALES. 


"FEMALES 


3 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 




1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


2 




2 


4 




4 


1 




1 


1 


1 




4 


2 


2 



Total, 26 11 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS, 



15 



Born in United States, 
'• Canada, 



21 



Father. Mother 
14 12 

2 3 



22 

Born in Ireland, 1 j 

" Germany, 9 5 

" India, 1 



26 26 



Births for the five previous years : 

1884 1885 1886 

33 32 39 

MARRIAGES BY 

January, 

February, . . . . 

March, 

April, .... 

July, .... 

August, . . 

September, 

October, . . . 

November, 

Total, 

First marriage of both parties, 

First marriage of bride, - 

Second marriage of groom, 

Second marriage of bride, 

Third marriage of groom, 

Age of oldest bride, 

Age of youngest brides, (2) 

Age of oldest groom, 

Age of youngest grooms, (2) 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 

Bride. Groom- 
Born in United States, 8 8 
" Canada, 1 
" Germany, 1 1 
u Ireland, 1 

10 io p 



1887 




1888 


30 




22 


MONTHS. 




NO. 


• 




1 


. 


. 


1 


• 


• 


1 

2 


• 


. 


1 


• 


. 


1 


. 


. 


1 


. 


. 


1 






1 

10 

8 
1 
1 
1 
1 




70 


years. 




17 


u 




62 


It 




21 


a 



23 



Number of certificates of marriage issued from this office, lo 

Marriages recorded for the five previous years : 

1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 

10 9 5 6 7 

DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

September, 

December, 



NO. 


MALES. 


FEMALES 


1 


1 




5 


1 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




2 


2 




■2 


1 


1 


6 


4 


2 


1 


.1 




2 


1 


1 



Total. 



22 



13 



Under 
Betwet 


5 years of age, 
;n 5 and 10, 


a 


10 " 


20, 


a 


20 « 


30, 


u 


30 " 


40, 


a 


40 " 


50, 


u 


50 " 


60, 


a 


60 " 


70, 


a 


70 " 


80, 




80 » 


90, 



Males. 


Females 


6 











• 











2 


1 


1 


3 





2 


3 





1 


2 




1 



13 9 

Age of oldest person deceased, 81 years. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Born in United States, 
" Ireland, 



Males. Females. 
9 8 

9 



24 

Born in Germany, 1 1 

" Canada, 1 

13 9 

Death rate for five previous years : 

1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 

22 24 24 20 22 

Causes of death classified according to the nomenclature 
adopted by the State Board of Registration. 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Cancer, 1 

Phthisis, (Consumption of Lungs,) 5 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

•Disease of- Heart, 1 

Apoplexy, 3 

Convulsions, 3 

Pneumonia, 3 

Peritonitis, 1 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 

Premature Birth, 2 

Old Age, 1 

Still Born, 1 

VIOLENT DEATHS. 



Drowning, (Accidental,) 



22 



25 

DOGS. 

The number of Dogs licensed during the year ending Nov. 
30th, 1889, with the receipts and settlement of the account with 
the County Treasurer, is as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

65 Dogs, I 133 00 

Less fees at 20 cents each, 13 00 

_ $ 120 00 

Paid Lewis Warner, County Treasurer, $ 120 00 

Amount paid the County Treasurer on this account for the 
five previous years : 

1884 1885 1886 1887' 1888 

$72 00 892 40 8101 40 $101 40 $122 40 



There have been recorded in the Town Clerk's office, from 
March 1st, 1889, to March 1st, 1890, seven mortgages of personal 
property. All other papers four. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. D. BILLINGS, Town Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The money appropriated for schools has given ns but 31 
weeks, whereas, formerly, and till within three years, the 
school year has been 35 or 36 weeks. 

At the same time, school work has been increasing. 
Vocal music now takes 1-12 of the time ; language teaching 
has grown from almost nothing to require another twelfth of 
the school time, while observation lessons and "incidental 
teaching" have an equal share. Thus one-fourth of the time 
daily is now used for teaching what a few years ago was 
scarcely recognized in our school-rooms. In the old studies 
more rather than less is required. This is especially true of 
primary arithmetic, the reading lesson, and geography. 

Many country towns, recognizing the necessity for it, 
have increased the length of their schools; we, on the con- 
trary, have met the demand for more work with a lessened 
time to do it in. We cannot return to the customs of the 
past in our schools. The old studies must be learned as be- 
fore or better than before, and the later innovations must 
have a place. The times demands a development of intelli- 
gence and the faculty of expression, and not the rythmic 

27 



28 

of years gone by. Our best schools may be 
defective and open to criticism; indeed we know they are 
so, but we shall not perfect them by substituting the customs 
which the educated world has discarded. The remedy is not 
backward but onward. 

The question of school-district superin tendance will 
again come before the town. An older law than that of 
1888 gave towns the legal right to unite in districts for the 
purpose of maintaining school superintendents. The law 
of 1888 provides that if the district formed has not less than 
80 or more than 50 schools and the salary of the superinten- 
dent is not less than 11250 yearly and has been maintained 
for one year, and if the towns forming the district have each 
raised by taxation as much money for the support of schools 
as they have raised on an average for the three previous 
years, then the state will pay to such district $ 1000, one- 
half of which shall go toward the pay of superintendent 
and one-half shall be used for the support of schools. 

Should Hatfield unite with Deerfield and Leverett, as 
now seems possible, the money matter, as near as can be cal- 
culated without the figures of school attendance in the 
towns for this year, would stand thus : 

Salary of Superintendent, $1,250 00 

Deerfield's share, 8430 

Leverett's share, 112 

Hatfield's share, 208 

To come from the state, . 500 



$1,250 00 

Hatfield would get of the $500 to go for the support of 
schools $138 nearly. 



29 

STATEMENT OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS EM- 
PLOYED, ETC. 



CENTER — GRAMMAR. 

Mary L. Waite. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 30 

Average membership, 23 

Average attendance, 20 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $248 

CENTER — PR I MA R Y. 

Carrie L. Warner. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 41 

Average membership, 39 

Average attendance, 36 

Number of scholars under 5, 1 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $248 

HILL — GR A M MA R . 

Seraph M. Loomis. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 28 

Average membership, 25 

Average attendance, 22 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $217 

HTLL — PRIMARY. 

Martha P. Swinerton. 

Grace E. Webber. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 31 

Average membership, 21 

Average attendance, 19 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $197 



30 

WEST HATFIELD — GRAMMAR. 

Rosella E. Clark. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 24 

Average membership, 26 

Average attendance, 23 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 1 

Number of weeks school, 33 

Amount paid as wages, 1231 

WEST HATFIELD — PRIMARY. 

Lizzie D. Porter. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 33 

Average membership, 24 

Average attendance, 21 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $217 

WEST BROOK. 

Alberta L. Pierce. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 39 

Average membership, 29 

Average attendance, 24 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 2 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $217 

FARMS. 

Hattie A. Carl. 

Augusta I. Richardson. 

Number of scholars enrolled, 31 

Average membership, 21 

Average attendance, 19 

Number of weeks school, 31 

Amount paid as wages, $217 



31 
SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Number of persons between 5 and 15 years, 247 

8 and 14 years, 157 

Number of scholars enrolled, 257 

Number of scholars between 5 and 15 years, 253 

" " " 8 and 14 years, 160 

Average membership in all the schools, 208 

" attendance in all the schools, 184 

Number of scholars over 15 years of age, 3 

Number of scholars under 5 years of age, 1 

APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 

Appropriated by the town, 
Received from state fund, 

" " dog fund, 

Due, Tuitions from Northampton, 
Received Tuitions from Whately, 
Contributed at West Hatfield, 



EXPENDITURES CHARGEABLE TO SCHOOL 
MONEY. 



.$1700 


00 


309 


64 


65 


54 


63 


75 


30 


00 


14 00 


12,182 


93 



Amount of Teacher's wages, 
Expeuded for fuel, 

" care of houses, 

" for charts, 
Balance unexpended, 



11,774 


00 


224 


63 


114 55 


22 


50 


47 


25 


#2,182 


93 



Appropriated for music, $150 00 

Expended for music, 150 00 

Appropriated for books and supplies, $250 00 

Expended for books and supplies, 121 67 



Balance unexpended, $128 33 

An unpaid bill for books will diminish this balance con- 
siderably. 



Estimate of Expenditures for 1890—91. 

For schools, $2,000 00 

For Books and Supplies, • 250 00 

For music teachers, 150 00 

C. M. BARTON, ) 

S. S. DWIGHT, } School Committee. 

OSCAR BELDEN. )